Special Issue "Advances in Conservation Biocontrol of Beneficial Insects"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Ecology, Diversity and Conservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Vera A. Krischik
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55455, USA
Interests: insecticides; sublethal effects; ecosystem services; predators; native bees; butterflies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Conservation biocontrol is essential in urban and argicultural landscapes to perserve beneficial insects that can suppress pest insect populations. Without beneficial insects, the reliance on conventional insecticides only increases, further reducing the ability of beneficial insects to supress pests. Cumulative and sublethal pesticide exposure can impact beneficial insects by reducing reproduction and essential behaviors. In addition, pesticide use can cause cascading effects on nontarget species. A better understanding of the ways in which sublethal exposure alters insect immune systems, physiological stress, reproduction, and behavior is important. Urban landscapes, parks, and riparian areas offer habitats that can support predators, parasitoids, butterflies, and native bees when managed with decreased cosmetic use of pesticides.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Vera A. Krischik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • conservation biocontrol
  • beneficial insects
  • ecosystem services
  • sublethal effects

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assemblage of the Egg Parasitoids of the Invasive Stink Bug Halyomorpha halys: Insights on Plant Host Associations
Insects 2020, 11(9), 588; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11090588 - 01 Sep 2020
Abstract
Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is an invasive alien species and a key agricultural pest. Its native parasitoids (Trissolcus japonicus Ashmead and Tr. mitsukurii Ashmead) have been registered in several countries where H. halys brought dramatic economic losses and where biological control [...] Read more.
Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is an invasive alien species and a key agricultural pest. Its native parasitoids (Trissolcus japonicus Ashmead and Tr. mitsukurii Ashmead) have been registered in several countries where H. halys brought dramatic economic losses and where biological control is considered to be the most effective long-term solution. By searching for stink bug egg masses and exposing sentinel egg masses, we monitored the distribution of native and exotic egg parasitoids in Trentino-Alto Adige (Italy), an area where both the host and parasitoids are in expansion. We recorded ten pentatomids, seven parasitoid species, with the first report of Tr. japonicus in this area and a hyperparasitoid. In the assemblage, Anastatus bifasciatus (Geoffroy) and Tr. mitsukurii were the dominant parasitoids, with a different distribution in terms of context and host plants. Sycamore was the host plant where the highest number of naturally laid parasitized egg masses (26%) were recorded. Trissolcus mitsukurii showed the highest parasitism rate, and was often found in apple orchards. The emergence of exotic parasitoids showed a temporal delay compared to native ones. Sequence analysis of 823 bp of the CO1 mitochondrial gene revealed that the recovered Tr. japonicus and Tr. mitsukurii harbored one single haplotype each. These haplotypes were previously found in 2018 in Northern Italy. While sentinel egg masses proved to be very effective in tracking the arrival of exotic Trissolcus species, the collection of stink bug egg masses provided fundamental data on the plant host species. The results lend strong support to the adaptation of exotic Trissolcus species to the environmental conditions of the range of introduction, providing new information on plant host-associations, fundamental for the development of biological control programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Conservation Biocontrol of Beneficial Insects)
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