Topical Collection "Biocontrol and Behavioral Approaches to Manage Invasive Insects"

A topical collection in Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This collection belongs to the section "Insect Behavior and Pathology".

Editor

Dr. Lara Maistrello
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Life Sciences, Centre BIOGEST-SITEIA, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via G. Amendola 2, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy
Interests: invasive species; biological control; integrated pest management; agro-food sustainability; insect-based bioconversion; black soldier fly

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invasive species are a global issue that increasingly threatens ecosystem services and, thus, human health and the economy. Attempts to manage outbreaks of invasive insects by intensifying insecticide treatments led to the disruption of previous integrated pest management programs, further, resulting in serious negative impacts on the environment. The challenge is to develop sustainable, research-based approaches to manage invasive pests efficiently, providing effective long-term solutions. Knowledge of the native and exotic biocontrol agents, as well as of specific behavioral patterns of the target pest, are key factors to develop successful control strategies.

This Topical Collection focuses on the sustainable management of invasive insects and will present the development and/or application of biological control strategies (i.e., classical, conservative, inoculative, inundative biocontrol) and behavioral manipulation approaches and techniques (i.e., push–pull strategy, attract-and-kill, trap crops), either alone or in combination.

Authors are invited to submit contributions that deal with either agricultural, structural, or medical invasive pest species.

Dr. Lara Maistrello
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Invasive insects
  • biological control strategies
  • behavior-based strategies
  • chemical ecology
  • behavioral manipulation
  • push–pull strategy
  • attract-and-kill
  • trap cropping
  • sustainable pest management
  • integrated approaches

Published Papers (8 papers)

2021

Jump to: 2020

Review
Perspectives for Synergic Blends of Attractive Sources in South American Palm Weevil Mass Trapping: Waiting for the Red Palm Weevil Brazil Invasion
Insects 2021, 12(9), 828; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12090828 - 14 Sep 2021
Viewed by 343
Abstract
Coupling several natural and synthetic lures with aggregation pheromones from the palm weevils Rhynchophorus palmarum and R. ferrugineus reveals a synergy that results in an increase in pest captures. The combined attraction of pure pheromones, ethyl acetate, and decaying sweet and starchy plant [...] Read more.
Coupling several natural and synthetic lures with aggregation pheromones from the palm weevils Rhynchophorus palmarum and R. ferrugineus reveals a synergy that results in an increase in pest captures. The combined attraction of pure pheromones, ethyl acetate, and decaying sweet and starchy plant tissue increases the net total of mass-trapped weevils. The 2018 entrance of the red palm weevil (RPW) into South America has threatened palm-product income in Brazil and other neighboring countries. The presence of the new A1 quarantine pest necessitates the review of all available options for a sustainable mass-trapping, monitoring, and control strategy to ultimately target both weevils with the same device. The effective lure-blend set for the mass-trapping system will attract weevils in baiting and contaminating stations for entomopathogenic fungi that the same weevils will spread. Full article
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Article
Tracing the Origin of Korean Invasive Populations of the Spotted Lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae)
Insects 2021, 12(6), 539; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12060539 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 798
Abstract
Lycorma delicatula (White) suddenly arrived in Korea where it rapidly spread out in the central region of Korea and caused serious damage to grape vineyards. To trace the source region of its invasiveness, population genetic structures were compared between the native region, China, [...] Read more.
Lycorma delicatula (White) suddenly arrived in Korea where it rapidly spread out in the central region of Korea and caused serious damage to grape vineyards. To trace the source region of its invasiveness, population genetic structures were compared between the native region, China, and the introduced regions, Korea and Japan. We examined 762 individuals from 38 different population collections using 15 microsatellite loci. Both principal coordinate and structure analyses displayed that the Chinese populations were separated into three subgroups which were located significantly far apart from each other. Among them, the Shanghai population was located closest to most Korean populations. Based on the genetic relationships and structures, it was revealed that the multiple introductions into Korea occurred at least three times. In addition, the Shanghai population was strongly estimated to be a source of initial invasive populations of Korea. In addition, analysis of the approximate Bayesian computation suggested simultaneous spread from two distant locations early in the invasion by artificial transportation of the host plants bearing egg masses. Our population genetics study can provide a precedent case with regards to identifying spreads by anthropogenic outcomes in other invasive regions. Full article
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Article
Optimal Conditions for Diapause Survival of Aprostocetus fukutai, an Egg Parasitoid for Biological Control of Anoplophora chinensis
Insects 2021, 12(6), 535; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12060535 - 09 Jun 2021
Viewed by 601
Abstract
Aprostocetus fukutai is a specialist egg parasitoid of the citrus longhorned beetle Anoplophora chinensis, a high-risk invasive pest of hardwood trees. The parasitoid overwinters as diapausing mature larvae within the host egg and emerges in early summer in synchrony with the egg-laying [...] Read more.
Aprostocetus fukutai is a specialist egg parasitoid of the citrus longhorned beetle Anoplophora chinensis, a high-risk invasive pest of hardwood trees. The parasitoid overwinters as diapausing mature larvae within the host egg and emerges in early summer in synchrony with the egg-laying peak of A. chinensis. This study investigated the parasitoid’s diapause survival in parasitized host eggs that either remained in potted trees under semi-natural conditions in southern France or were removed from the wood and held at four different humidities (44, 75, 85–93 and 100% RH) at 11 °C or four different temperature regimes (2, 5, 10 and 12.5 °C) at 100% RH in the laboratory. The temperature regimes reflect overwintering temperatures across the parasitoid’s geographical distribution in its native range. Results show that the parasitoid resumed its development to the adult stage at normal rearing conditions (22 °C, 100% RH, 14L:10D) after 6- or 7-months cold chilling at both the semi-natural and laboratory conditions. It had a low survival rate (36.7%) on potted plants due to desiccation or tree wound defense response. No parasitoids survived at 44% RH, but survival rate increased with humidity, reaching the highest (93.7%) at 100% RH. Survival rate also increased from 21.0% at 2 °C to 82.8% at 12.5 °C. Post-diapause developmental time decreased with increased humidity or temperature. There was no difference in the lifetime fecundity of emerged females from 2 and 12.5 °C. These results suggest that 100% RH and 12.5 °C are the most suitable diapause conditions for laboratory rearing of this parasitoid. Full article
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Article
Assessing the Distribution of Exotic Egg Parasitoids of Halyomorpha halys in Europe with a Large-Scale Monitoring Program
Insects 2021, 12(4), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040316 - 01 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1212
Abstract
The brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys is an invasive agricultural pest with a worldwide distribution. Classical biological control has been identified as the most promising method to reduce the populations of H. halys. Adventive populations of two candidates for releases, Trissolcus [...] Read more.
The brown marmorated stink bug Halyomorpha halys is an invasive agricultural pest with a worldwide distribution. Classical biological control has been identified as the most promising method to reduce the populations of H. halys. Adventive populations of two candidates for releases, Trissolcus japonicus and Trissolcus mitsukurii, have recently been detected in Europe. To assess their distribution and abundance, a large-scale survey was performed. From May to September 2019, a wide area covering northern Italy and parts of Switzerland was surveyed, highlighting the expanding distribution of both Tr. japonicus and Tr. mitsukurii. Within four years after their first detection in Europe, both species have rapidly spread into all types of habitats where H. halys is present, showing a wide distribution and continuous expansion. Both exotic Trissolcus showed high levels of parasitism rate towards H. halys, while parasitization of non-target species was a rare event. The generalist Anastatus bifasciatus was the predominant native parasitoid of H. halys, while the emergence of native scelionids from H. halys eggs was rarely observed. The presence of the hyperparasitoid Acroclisoides sinicus was also recorded. This study provided fundamental data that supported the development of the first inoculative release program of Tr. japonicus in Europe. Full article
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Article
Predation on Drosophila suzukii within Hedges in the Agricultural Landscape
Insects 2021, 12(4), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12040305 - 30 Mar 2021
Viewed by 522
Abstract
The invasive Drosophila suzukii feeds and reproduces on various cultivated and wild fruits and moves between agricultural and semi-natural habitats. Hedges in agricultural landscapes play a vital role in the population development of D. suzukii, but also harbor a diverse community of [...] Read more.
The invasive Drosophila suzukii feeds and reproduces on various cultivated and wild fruits and moves between agricultural and semi-natural habitats. Hedges in agricultural landscapes play a vital role in the population development of D. suzukii, but also harbor a diverse community of natural enemies. We investigated predation by repeatedly exposing cohorts of D. suzukii pupae between June and October in dry and humid hedges at five different locations in Switzerland. We sampled predator communities and analyzed their gut content for the presence of D. suzukii DNA based on the COI marker. On average, 44% of the exposed pupae were predated. Predation was higher in dry than humid hedges, but did not differ significantly between pupae exposed on the ground or on branches and among sampling periods. Earwigs, spiders, and ants were the dominant predators. Predator communities did not vary significantly between hedge types or sampling periods. DNA of D. suzukii was detected in 3.4% of the earwigs, 1.8% of the spiders, and in one predatory bug (1.6%). While the molecular gut content analysis detected only a small proportion of predators that had fed on D. suzukii, overall predation seemed sufficient to reduce D. suzukii populations, in particular in hedges that provide few host fruit resources. Full article
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2020

Jump to: 2021

Article
The Ant Who Cried Wolf? Short-Term Repeated Exposure to Alarm Pheromone Reduces Behavioral Response in Argentine Ants
Insects 2020, 11(12), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11120871 - 08 Dec 2020
Viewed by 648
Abstract
In this study we test whether Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) progressively reduce their response to a salient stimulus (alarm pheromone) with increased exposure over time. First, we used a two-chamber olfactometer to demonstrate three focal behaviors of Argentine ants that indicate [...] Read more.
In this study we test whether Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) progressively reduce their response to a salient stimulus (alarm pheromone) with increased exposure over time. First, we used a two-chamber olfactometer to demonstrate three focal behaviors of Argentine ants that indicate an alarmed state in response to conspecific alarm pheromone and pure synthetic iridomyrmecin (a dominant component of L. humile alarm pheromone). We then measured how these behaviors changed after repeated exposure to conspecific alarm pheromone from live ants. In addition, we investigate whether there is a difference in the ants’ behavioral response after “short” (3 min) versus “long” (6 min) intervals between treatments. Our results show that Argentine ants do exhibit reduced responses to their own alarm pheromone, temporarily ceasing their response to it after four or five exposures, and this pattern holds whether exposure is repeated after “short” or “long” intervals. We suggest alarm pheromones may be perceived as false alarms unless threatening stimuli warrant a continued state of alarm. These results should be kept in mind while developing pheromone-based integrated pest management strategies. Full article
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Article
Modelling Drosophila suzukii Adult Male Populations: A Physiologically Based Approach with Validation
Insects 2020, 11(11), 751; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11110751 - 31 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 599
Abstract
The Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), is a harmful insect pest for soft fruit cultivations. Even though its main hosts belong to the genera Prunus and Rubus, its high polyphagy and adaptability to new environments makes it a serious problem [...] Read more.
The Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), is a harmful insect pest for soft fruit cultivations. Even though its main hosts belong to the genera Prunus and Rubus, its high polyphagy and adaptability to new environments makes it a serious problem for farmers worldwide, who have reported several economic losses because of this pest. A wide series of proposals to control SWD are available and operate in line with the mechanisms of integrated pest management, demonstrating their high efficiency when applied at the opportune moment. This work aims to apply and validate a physiologically based model which summarises all the available information about D. suzukii biology, such as the relationship between environmental temperature and its development, fertility and mortality rates. The model provided, as a result, a description of a population of SWD females taking into consideration the multiple generations that occurred during the year. Simulations were then compared with field data collected in a three-year survey in two experimental fields located in the Sabina Romana area (Lazio, Italy). More specifically, D. suzukii males were monitored with traps in fields cultivated with mixed varieties of cherries and they were selected because of their clearer identification in comparison to females. Results showed a high level of reliability of simulations in representing the field data, highlighting at the same time that there is no discrepancy in simulating D. suzukii females in order to represent male populations. Full article
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Article
Identification of Entomopathogenic Fungi as Naturally Occurring Enemies of the Invasive Oak Lace Bug, Corythucha arcuata (Say) (Hemiptera: Tingidae)
Insects 2020, 11(10), 679; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11100679 - 07 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 774
Abstract
The oak lace bug (OLB), Corythucha arcuata (Hemiptera: Tingidae), was first identified as an invasive pest in Europe in northern Italy in 2000 and since then it has spread rapidly, attacking large forested areas in European countries. The OLB is a cell sap-sucking [...] Read more.
The oak lace bug (OLB), Corythucha arcuata (Hemiptera: Tingidae), was first identified as an invasive pest in Europe in northern Italy in 2000 and since then it has spread rapidly, attacking large forested areas in European countries. The OLB is a cell sap-sucking insect that is native to North America, with Quercus spp. as its main host. Its rapid expansion, successful establishment in invaded countries, and observations of more damage to hosts compared to native areas are most likely due to a lack of natural enemies, pathogens and competitors. In its native area, various natural enemies of OLBs have been identified; however, little is known about the occurrence and impact of OLB pathogens. None of the pathogenic fungi found on OLBs in natural conditions have been identified until now. In this study, we provide evidence of four entomopathogenic fungi that are naturally occurring on invasive OLBs found in infested pedunculate oak forests in eastern Croatia. On the basis of their morphology and multilocus molecular phylogeny, the fungi were identified as Beauveria pseudobassiana, Lecanicillium pissodis, Akanthomyces attenuatus and Samsoniella alboaurantium. The sequences generated for this study are available from GenBank under the accession numbers MT004817-MT004820, MT004833-MT004835, MT027501-MT27510, and MT001936-MT0011943. These pathogenic species could facilitate biological control strategies against OLBs. Full article
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