Special Issue "Climate Change Effects on Infrastructure"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018) | Viewed by 11021

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Boulent Imam
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences (c5), University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK
Interests: structural health monitoring of bridges; fatigue assessment; metallic bridges; scour and corrosion assessment; reliability assessment of bridges
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is one of the most important global challenges to be addressed in the coming years. Infrastructure systems, which are required to be operational over very long time scales, are increasingly likely to experience the impact of climate change over their lifetime. Climate change is expected to result in increases in the magnitude and/or frequency of extreme events as well as long-term changes in average climatic conditions. Examples of extreme events are extreme precipitation and flooding, heatwaves and cold snaps, periods of drought, extreme storms and winds, etc. Long-term changes in climatic conditions can include changes in average temperatures, precipitation, relative humidity, sea-level rise, atmospheric pollution, etc. Knowledge of future climatic conditions is essential in order to aid infrastructure owners manage the impact of climate change on both existing and planned infrastructure. Climate change impact planning for new items of infrastructure will ensure continuous functionality throughout their life.

The aim of this Special Issue is to consolidate the current state-of-the-art knowledge in addressing the effects of climate change on infrastructure systems, covering both extreme events, as well as gradual changes. We invite contributions from all infrastructure sectors, i.e., transport, water and waste, energy, and Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Suggested topics can include quantification of climate change effects and risks, particularly focusing on uncertainties and variabilities, estimation of impact costs, vulnerability, resilience and risk analysis, climate change mitigation, and adaptation activities on infrastructures. Studies can range from individual infrastructure assets to infrastructure networks and systems, including interdependencies between different infrastructure sectors.

Dr. Boulent Imam
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Creating Stakeholder Value through Risk Mitigation Measures in the Context of Disaster Management
Infrastructures 2017, 2(4), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures2040014 - 19 Oct 2017
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5038
Abstract
The resilience of critical infrastructure (CI) to extreme weather events (EWE) is one of the most demanding challenges for all stakeholders in modern society. Although partial risk reduction is feasible through the introduction and implementation of various risk mitigation measures (RMM), decision-makers at [...] Read more.
The resilience of critical infrastructure (CI) to extreme weather events (EWE) is one of the most demanding challenges for all stakeholders in modern society. Although partial risk reduction is feasible through the introduction and implementation of various risk mitigation measures (RMM), decision-makers at all decision-making levels are pressured to find ways to cope with the impending extreme weather and to have a thorough understanding of the EWE impacts on CI. This paper discusses how the value of RMMs can be created and assessed in a stakeholder network. Qualitative research methods, namely literature review and AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process), were applied as research methods. The paper examines how disaster management and value creation both converge and differ from each other. It also presents a case study on the value of various RMM and the impacts of extreme winter conditions on electricity distribution in Finland. Based on the case study, the most important value criterion was the benefits of the RMM in economic, social, and environmental terms. At a fundamental level, the value of RMM should be expressed not only in terms of money but also in regard to safety, security, societal acceptability, CI dependability, and other typically intangible criteria. Moreover, the results reveal that the interrelationship of value creation and disaster management offers new insights to both approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Effects on Infrastructure)
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Article
Quantifying the Financial Impact of Climate Change on Australian Local Government Roads
Infrastructures 2017, 2(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures2010002 - 11 Jan 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5272
Abstract
Australia’s 560 Councils are responsible for assets worth approximately $270 billion, many of which have a life span >50 years and so will be affected by climate change. Maintenance and replacement of Council infrastructure is guided by principles, models and tools in the [...] Read more.
Australia’s 560 Councils are responsible for assets worth approximately $270 billion, many of which have a life span >50 years and so will be affected by climate change. Maintenance and replacement of Council infrastructure is guided by principles, models and tools in the International Infrastructure Management Manual that currently do not allow for climate change impacts or the likely flow-on effects to asset and financial management. This paper describes a financial simulation model developed to calculate the financial impacts of climate change on three major asset classes of importance to Australian Councils: hotmix sealed, spray sealed and unsealed roads. The research goes beyond previous studies of climate change impacts on roads in that it provides a location specific toolkit that is designed to assist councils in their asset management and planned maintenance programmes. Two categories of inputs are required for the model: climate inputs, relating specifically to baseline temperature and rainfall distributions and climate change parameters for temperature and rainfall; and engineering inputs, relating specifically to the three road types and the key parameters of their performance and useful lives over the scenario period. The baseline distributions are then shifted mathematically within the model by the mean change as projected by a selected Global Climate Model (GCM) scenario. Outputs of the model are the historical baseline climate variable distributions and the climate change (CC) impacts on road performance are in the form of changes to the useful life of the asset and associated changes in asset resurfacing and rehabilitation costs. Ten case study local councils in southern Australia are examined. Using IPCC AR4 scenarios, the results suggest that the incremental impact of climate change on all three types of road infrastructure modelled will be generally low. There are small cost reductions over the period for all road types as a result of the expected drying and warming trends in the climate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Effects on Infrastructure)
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