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Special Issue "Zebrafish Models of Lymphocyte Development and Lymphocytic Cancers"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. J. Kimble Frazer
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Children's Hospital Foundation E.L. & Thelma Gaylord Chair in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Cell Biology, and Microbiology & Immunology, Jimmy Everest Section of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA
Interests: pediatric leukemias and lymphomas

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have a long-standing history as models for studying vertebrate developmental processes and, more recently, in studies of the vertebrate immune system. Such work has focused on both the innate and the adaptive arms of the immune system. Lymphocytes have integral roles in both aspects of immunity. In addition, zebrafish have also been used to study immune system cancers, with the very first D. rerio cancer model being a transgenic line prone to lymphoblast malignancies, and several others since described. Tools and techniques to fluorescently label cells and to ablate or transgenically mis-express genes in specific D. rerio lineages continue to expand, making zebrafish a premier model for in vivo studies of normal and abnormal gene function in immune cells. Moreover, the recent discoveries of T regulatory cells and innate lymphoid cells in zebrafish prove once again that humans and D. rerio share similar immune cell populations, opening new avenues of research into the functional roles of these cells and the genetic programs that govern those functions. In this Special Issue, we invite contributions pertaining to these and related topics, focusing on zebrafish lymphocytes, how they develop, and the genes and mechanisms that guide their development and function. In addition, we solicit articles regarding lymphocytic cancers and the genetic events that cause malignant transformation in vertebrate lymphocytes or that drive aggressiveness and treatment resistance in lymphocyte cancers. Zebrafish are amenable to diverse experimental strategies, from genetic manipulation to real-time in vivo imaging and from high-throughput screens to gene- or cell-specific mechanistic studies. Submissions utilizing these and other approaches to study zebrafish lymphocytes in both normal and pathologic biological contexts are all of interest to this Special Issue.

Dr. J. Kimble Frazer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zebrafish
  • Danio rerio
  • hematopoiesis
  • lymphopoiesis
  • lymphocyte
  • lymphoblast
  • B cell
  • T cell
  • T regulatory cell, Treg
  • NK cell
  • innate lymphoid cell
  • immunoglobulin
  • antibody
  • T cell receptor
  • leukemia
  • lymphoma
  • oncogenesis
  • leukemogenesis
  • lymphomagenesis
  • immunology
  • oncology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Pharmacological Enhancement of Regeneration-Dependent Regulatory T Cell Recruitment in Zebrafish
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(20), 5189; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20205189 - 19 Oct 2019
Abstract
Regenerative capacity varies greatly between species. Mammals are limited in their ability to regenerate damaged cells, tissues and organs compared to organisms with robust regenerative responses, such as zebrafish. The regeneration of zebrafish tissues including the heart, spinal cord and retina requires foxp3a+ [...] Read more.
Regenerative capacity varies greatly between species. Mammals are limited in their ability to regenerate damaged cells, tissues and organs compared to organisms with robust regenerative responses, such as zebrafish. The regeneration of zebrafish tissues including the heart, spinal cord and retina requires foxp3a+ zebrafish regulatory T cells (zTregs). However, it remains unclear whether the muted regenerative responses in mammals are due to impaired recruitment and/or function of homologous mammalian regulatory T cell (Treg) populations. Here, we explore the possibility of enhancing zTreg recruitment with pharmacological interventions using the well-characterized zebrafish tail amputation model to establish a high-throughput screening platform. Injury-infiltrating zTregs were transgenically labelled to enable rapid quantification in live animals. We screened the NIH Clinical Collection (727 small molecules) for modulators of zTreg recruitment to the regenerating tissue at three days post-injury. We discovered that the dopamine agonist pramipexole, a drug currently approved for treating Parkinson’s Disease, specifically enhanced zTreg recruitment after injury. The dopamine antagonist SCH-23390 blocked pramipexole activity, suggesting that peripheral dopaminergic signaling may regulate zTreg recruitment. Similar pharmacological approaches for enhancing mammalian Treg recruitment may be an important step in developing novel strategies for tissue regeneration in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish Models of Lymphocyte Development and Lymphocytic Cancers)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Zebrafish and Medaka: Two Teleost Models of T-Cell and Thymic Development
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(17), 4179; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20174179 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
Over the past two decades, studies have demonstrated that several features of T-cell and thymic development are conserved from teleosts to mammals. In particular, works using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) have shed light on the cellular [...] Read more.
Over the past two decades, studies have demonstrated that several features of T-cell and thymic development are conserved from teleosts to mammals. In particular, works using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) have shed light on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these biological processes. In particular, the ease of noninvasive in vivo imaging of these species enables direct visualization of all events associated with these processes, which are, in mice, technically very demanding. In this review, we focus on defining the similarities and differences between zebrafish and medaka in T-cell development and thymus organogenesis; and highlight their advantages as two complementary model systems for T-cell immunobiology and modeling of human diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish Models of Lymphocyte Development and Lymphocytic Cancers)
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