ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Molecular Pathways for Vascular Risk in Diabetes"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022 | Viewed by 5207

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ramzi Ajjan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Leeds Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
Interests: glycaemia in diabetes; thrombosis in diabetes; reduction of cardiovascular risk in diabetes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cardiovascular disease remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. It is now generally acknowledged that diabetes is a continuum of various stages of the condition, with each having a different vascular risk. The reasons for the adverse vascular profile in diabetes are related to a combination of more extensive atherosclerotic disease coupled with an enhanced thrombotic environment.

This Special Issue is particularly interested in collecting research articles, comprehensive reviews, or short communications in the following topics, but all other related topics are welcomed.

  1. Molecular mechanisms linking complements proteins with increased thrombosis risk, particularly in diabetes;
  2. Hypoglycemia, glycemic variability, and vascular pathology in diabetes;
  3. Novel insights into platelet function/dysfunction in diabetes: Implications for future anti-thrombotic therapies;
  4. Inflammation and atherothrombosis: relevance in diabetes;
  5. Molecular mechanisms for the vascular and cardiac benefits of sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2).

Prof. Dr. Ramzi Ajjan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Hypoglycemia, Vascular Disease and Cognitive Dysfunction in Diabetes: Insights from Text Mining-Based Reconstruction and Bioinformatics Analysis of the Gene Networks
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(22), 12419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222212419 - 17 Nov 2021
Viewed by 888
Abstract
Hypoglycemia has been recognized as a risk factor for diabetic vascular complications and cognitive decline, but the molecular mechanisms of the effect of hypoglycemia on target organs are not fully understood. In this work, gene networks of hypoglycemia and cardiovascular disease, diabetic retinopathy, [...] Read more.
Hypoglycemia has been recognized as a risk factor for diabetic vascular complications and cognitive decline, but the molecular mechanisms of the effect of hypoglycemia on target organs are not fully understood. In this work, gene networks of hypoglycemia and cardiovascular disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic neuropathy, cognitive decline, and Alzheimer’s disease were reconstructed using ANDSystem, a text-mining-based tool. The gene network of hypoglycemia included 141 genes and 2467 interactions. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes showed that the regulation of insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis, apoptosis, nitric oxide biosynthesis, and cell signaling are significantly enriched for hypoglycemia. Among the network hubs, INS, IL6, LEP, TNF, IL1B, EGFR, and FOS had the highest betweenness centrality, while GPR142, MBOAT4, SLC5A4, IGFBP6, PPY, G6PC1, SLC2A2, GYS2, GCGR, and AQP7 demonstrated the highest cross-talk specificity. Hypoglycemia-related genes were overrepresented in the gene networks of diabetic complications and comorbidity; moreover, 14 genes were mutual for all studied disorders. Eleven GO biological processes (glucose homeostasis, nitric oxide biosynthesis, smooth muscle cell proliferation, ERK1 and ERK2 cascade, etc.) were overrepresented in all reconstructed networks. The obtained results expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the deteriorating effects of hypoglycemia in diabetes-associated vascular disease and cognitive dysfunction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Pathways for Vascular Risk in Diabetes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
The Interplay between Non-Esterified Fatty Acids and Plasma Zinc and Its Influence on Thrombotic Risk in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(18), 10140; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221810140 - 20 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1011
Abstract
Thrombosis is a major comorbidity of obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite the development of numerous effective treatments and preventative strategies to address thrombotic disease in such individuals, the incidence of thrombotic complications remains high. This suggests that not all the pathophysiological [...] Read more.
Thrombosis is a major comorbidity of obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite the development of numerous effective treatments and preventative strategies to address thrombotic disease in such individuals, the incidence of thrombotic complications remains high. This suggests that not all the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these events have been identified or targeted. Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) are increasingly regarded as a nexus between obesity, insulin resistance, and vascular disease. Notably, plasma NEFA levels are consistently elevated in obesity and T2DM and may impact hemostasis in several ways. A potentially unrecognized route of NEFA-mediated thrombotic activity is their ability to disturb Zn2+ speciation in the plasma. Zn2+ is a potent regulator of coagulation and its availability in the plasma is monitored carefully through buffering by human serum albumin (HSA). The binding of long-chain NEFAs such as palmitate and stearate, however, trigger a conformational change in HSA that reduces its ability to bind Zn2+, thus increasing the ion’s availability to bind and activate coagulation proteins. NEFA-mediated perturbation of HSA-Zn2+ binding is thus predicted to contribute to the prothrombotic milieu in obesity and T2DM, representing a novel targetable disease mechanism in these disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Pathways for Vascular Risk in Diabetes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Glucose Variability: How Does It Work?
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 7783; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22157783 - 21 Jul 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1456
Abstract
A growing body of evidence points to the role of glucose variability (GV) in the development of the microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In this review, we summarize data on GV-induced biochemical, cellular and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic [...] Read more.
A growing body of evidence points to the role of glucose variability (GV) in the development of the microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes. In this review, we summarize data on GV-induced biochemical, cellular and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Current data indicate that the deteriorating effect of GV on target organs can be realized through oxidative stress, glycation, chronic low-grade inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, impaired angiogenesis and renal fibrosis. The effects of GV on oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and hypercoagulability could be aggravated by hypoglycemia, associated with high GV. Oscillating hyperglycemia contributes to beta cell dysfunction, which leads to a further increase in GV and completes the vicious circle. In cells, the GV-induced cytotoxic effect includes mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and disturbances in autophagic flux, which are accompanied by reduced viability, activation of apoptosis and abnormalities in cell proliferation. These effects are realized through the up- and down-regulation of a large number of genes and the activity of signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, MAPK (ERK), JNK and TGF-β/Smad. Epigenetic modifications mediate the postponed effects of glucose fluctuations. The multiple deteriorative effects of GV provide further support for considering it as a therapeutic target in diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Pathways for Vascular Risk in Diabetes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
PAI-1 in Diabetes: Pathophysiology and Role as a Therapeutic Target
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(6), 3170; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22063170 - 20 Mar 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1230
Abstract
Hypofibrinolysis is a key abnormality in diabetes and contributes to the adverse vascular outcome in this population. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important regulator of the fibrinolytic process and levels of this antifibrinolytic protein are elevated in diabetes and insulin resistant states. [...] Read more.
Hypofibrinolysis is a key abnormality in diabetes and contributes to the adverse vascular outcome in this population. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is an important regulator of the fibrinolytic process and levels of this antifibrinolytic protein are elevated in diabetes and insulin resistant states. This review describes both the physiological and pathological role of PAI-1 in health and disease, focusing on the mechanism of action as well as protein abnormalities in vascular disease with special focus on diabetes. Attempts at inhibiting protein function, using different techniques, are also discussed including direct and indirect interference with production as well as inhibition of protein function. Developing PAI-1 inhibitors represents an alternative approach to managing hypofibrinolysis by targeting the pathological abnormality rather than current practice that relies on profound inhibition of the cellular and/or acellular arms of coagulation, and which can be associated with increased bleeding events. The review offers up-to-date knowledge on the mechanisms of action of PAI-1 together with the role of altering protein function to improve hypofirbinolysis. Developing PAI-1 inhibitors may form for the basis of future new class of antithrombotic agents that reduce vascular complications in diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Pathways for Vascular Risk in Diabetes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop