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Molecular Effects of Antimicrobials on Periodontitis

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2022) | Viewed by 7758

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Département de Parodontologie, Université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France
Interests: periodontitis; peri-implantitis; antimicrobial molecules

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Periodontics, University of Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France
Interests: periodontology; implant dentistry; dental implantology; oral diseases; oral surgery; immunology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a common inflammatory disease of infectious origin with adverse consequences on oral health and systemic conditions, periodontitis management has been focused on specifically. Due to the limitations of current therapeutic strategies, the development of new drugs, compounds of natural or synthetic origins, and treatment protocols have been suggested over the last years.  Furthermore, the characterization of molecular host and microbial responses to anti-microbial agents could allow for the better identification of therapeutic needs and modalities.

Expected submissions will cover the following topics:

  1. The effect of new anti-microbial therapeutic strategies of periodontal treatment on microbial and inflammatory markers;
  2. The development of new systems of drug delivery;
  3. Molecular signatures of anti-microbial treatment response.

Dr. Jean-Luc Davideau
Dr. Olivier Huck
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • periodontitis
  • periodontal treatments
  • periodontal pathogens
  • local anti-microbial drugs
  • antibiotics
  • anti-microbial peptides
  • inflammatory markers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

16 pages, 2279 KiB  
Review
A Reciprocal Link between Oral, Gut Microbiota during Periodontitis: The Potential Role of Probiotics in Reducing Dysbiosis-Induced Inflammation
by Mattia Di Stefano, Simona Santonocito, Alessandro Polizzi, Rodolfo Mauceri, Giuseppe Troiano, Antonino Lo Giudice, Alessandra Romano, Marco Mascitti and Gaetano Isola
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(2), 1084; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24021084 - 06 Jan 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3575
Abstract
Human body is colonized by a florid microbial community of bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, helminths, and viruses, known as microbiota, which co-evolves with the host and influences its health through all stages of its life. It is well known that oral microorganisms form [...] Read more.
Human body is colonized by a florid microbial community of bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, helminths, and viruses, known as microbiota, which co-evolves with the host and influences its health through all stages of its life. It is well known that oral microorganisms form highly structurally and functionally organized multi-species biofilms and establish a network of complex mutual inter-species interactions having a primary function in synergy, signaling, or antagonism. This ecological model allows the microorganisms to increase their resistance to antimicrobial agents and settle a balanced microbes-host symbiotic relationship that ensures oral and global health status in humans. The host-associated microbiome is an important factor in human health and disease. Therefore, to develop novel diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies, microbiome’s functions and the reciprocal interactions every microbiome entertains with other microbial communities in the human body are being investigated. This review provides an analysis of the literature about the close connection between the two largest microbial communities in humans: the oral and the gut microbiomes. Furthermore, it focuses on how the alteration of their microbial and functional characteristics can lead to and reciprocally influence the onset of both oral and intestinal microbiome-associated illness, along with the potential role of probiotics in ameliorating inflammation and microbial dysbiosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Effects of Antimicrobials on Periodontitis)
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17 pages, 380 KiB  
Review
Selective Antimicrobial Therapies for Periodontitis: Win the “Battle and the War”
by Mahmoud Elashiry, Ana Carolina Morandini, Celine Joyce Cornelius Timothius, Mira Ghaly and Christopher W. Cutler
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(12), 6459; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22126459 - 16 Jun 2021
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3488
Abstract
Traditional antimicrobial therapies for periodontitis (PD) have long focused on non-selective and direct approaches. Professional cleaning of the subgingival biofilm by instrumentation of dental root surfaces, known as scaling and root planning (SRP), is the mainstay of periodontal therapy and is indisputably effective. [...] Read more.
Traditional antimicrobial therapies for periodontitis (PD) have long focused on non-selective and direct approaches. Professional cleaning of the subgingival biofilm by instrumentation of dental root surfaces, known as scaling and root planning (SRP), is the mainstay of periodontal therapy and is indisputably effective. Non-physical approaches used as adjuncts to SRP, such as chemical and biological agents, will be the focus of this review. In this regard, traditional agents such as oral antiseptics and antibiotics, delivered either locally or systemically, were briefly reviewed as a backdrop. While generally effective in winning the “battle” against PD in the short term, by reducing its signs and symptoms, patients receiving such therapies are more susceptible to recurrence of PD. Moreover, the long-term consequences of such therapies are still in question. In particular, concern about chronic use of systemic antibiotics and their influence on the oral and gut microbiota is warranted, considering antibiotic resistance plasmids, and potential transfer between oral and non-oral microbes. In the interest of winning the “battle and the war”, new more selective and targeted antimicrobials and biologics for PD are being studied. These are principally indirect, blocking pathways involved in bacterial colonization, nutrient acquisition, inflammation or cellular invasion without directly killing the pathogens. This review will focus on current and prospective antimicrobial therapies for PD, emphasizing therapies that act indirectly on the microbiota, with clearly defined cellular and molecular targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Effects of Antimicrobials on Periodontitis)
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