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New Advances on Zika Virus Research

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 2018

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Joint Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
2. Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
Interests: tick and mosquito-borne viral diseases; tropical infectious diseases; viral encephalitis; biosafety; inactivation of pathogenic viruses, zoonoses; arbovirus

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Zika virus (ZIKV), which belongs to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, causes Zika fever in humans. ZIKV infection of the central nervous system is associated with various neurological disorders, including congenital microcephaly, meningoencephalitis, and Guillain–Barré syndrome. ZIKV is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. ZIKV infection was first observed in monkeys in Uganda in 1947. The first cases of hwere identified in Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania in 1952, and sporadic cases were recorded in Africa and Asia during the 1960s to 1980s. Remarkably, an outbreak of ZIKV infection occurred in the Island of Yap, Federated States of Micronesia, in 2007, resulting in an estimated 5000 infections. This was followed by large outbreaks in French Polynesia in 2013 and other countries and territories in the Pacific and Brazil in 2015. So far, more than 80 countries and territories have reported evidence of Zika infections. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or treatment for ZIKV infection and, thus, the development of a vaccine and drugs for ZIKV infection is of significant priority for clinical care in endemic areas. Protection against bites of the vector mosquito is a key measure for preventing Zika virus infection and, thus, it is important to eliminate Aedes mosquito breeding sites. In consideration of this, an epidemiological survey of ZIKV distribution based on mosquito vectors will provide useful information in endemic areas. This Special Issue focuses on the recent research on ZIKV, including regarding pathogenesis, molecular biology, the development of vaccines and antiviral agents, and virus properties that can serve as useful targets for inactivation.

Dr. Daisuke Hayasaka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Flavivirus
  • pathogenesis
  • molecular biology
  • vector (mosquito)
  • epidemiology
  • vaccine
  • treatment
  • inactivation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1612 KiB  
Article
Repeated Intravaginal Inoculation of Zika Virus Protects Cynomolgus Monkeys from Subcutaneous Superchallenge
by Maya Shofa, Tomotaka Okamura, Emiko Urano, Yoshiharu Matsuura, Yasuhiro Yasutomi and Akatsuki Saito
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(22), 14002; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232214002 - 13 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1498
Abstract
Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreaks in Central and South America caused severe public health problems in 2015 and 2016. These outbreaks were finally contained through several methods, including mosquito control using insecticides and repellents. Additionally, the development of herd immunity in these countries might [...] Read more.
Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreaks in Central and South America caused severe public health problems in 2015 and 2016. These outbreaks were finally contained through several methods, including mosquito control using insecticides and repellents. Additionally, the development of herd immunity in these countries might have contributed to containing the epidemic. While ZIKV is mainly transmitted by mosquito bites and mucosal transmission via bodily fluids, including the semen of infected individuals, has also been reported. We evaluated the effect of mucosal ZIKV infection on continuous subcutaneous challenges in a cynomolgus monkey model. Repeated intravaginal inoculations of ZIKV did not induce detectable viremia or clinical symptoms, and all animals developed a potent neutralizing antibody, protecting animals from the subsequent subcutaneous superchallenge. These results suggest that viral replication at mucosal sites can induce protective immunity without causing systemic viremia or symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances on Zika Virus Research)
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