Special Issue "Education and Training in Applied Remote Sensing"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (7 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Ana I. Prados Website E-Mail
University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, 5523 Research Park Drive, Suite 140, Baltimore, MD 21228, USA
Interests: remote sensing training; environmental policy; air quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to educational and training programs that enable participants to integrate remote sensing data in applied or operational environments. There is worldwide recognition of the key role that remote sensing data plays in environmental monitoring, forecasting, planning, and related decision-making activities. This has led to a rapid increase in demand for education and training in applied remote sensing.

The overarching goal of the Special Issue is to provide both the educational and remote sensing communities with information to help define barriers and successful approaches to applied remote sensing education and training.

Papers are welcome in any area of environmental decision making, to include air pollution, disasters, ecological, land, and water resources management. Training and educational programs discussed can be in the academic or non-academic sector.

Important note: The goal of this Special Issue is not to discuss the transition of remote sensing education to applied research, but rather how that educational experience translates into professional work at government or private sector organizations who are engaged in decision making activities.

Topics include:

  1. Success stories in a applied remote sensing education or training, as defined in the previous paragraphs
  2. Best practices in applied remote sensing education or training
  3. E-learning and classroom approaches with a proven record of success in transitioning remote sensing data and research products into applied or operational environments
  4. Funding and institutional mechanisms that have been successful in transitioning remote sensing education and training into applied or operational environments
  5. Results of methodologies aimed at measuring the barriers and/or success of education and training in applied remote sensing
Dr. Ana I. Prados
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Education and Training in Applied Remote Sensing in Africa: The ARCSSTE-E Experience
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(8), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8080350 - 02 Aug 2019
Abstract
In Africa, there is growing knowledge regarding the use of data obtained by remote sensing and analysed while using Geographic Information Systems for solving myriad problems. The awareness has largely arisen through the efforts of the Programme on Space Applications (PSA) of the [...] Read more.
In Africa, there is growing knowledge regarding the use of data obtained by remote sensing and analysed while using Geographic Information Systems for solving myriad problems. The awareness has largely arisen through the efforts of the Programme on Space Applications (PSA) of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), and the subsequent UN resolutions for the establishment of Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education, to train scientists and researchers in different thematic areas of space, including Remote Sensing/Geographic Information Systems (RS/GIS). The African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in English (ARCSSTE-E) is one of these regional centres. The Centre has successfully trained 474 professionals from 18 countries since its inception in 1998; about 14% of these trainees have been female. This paper highlights the training programmes of ARCSSTE-E from its inception, and discusses the potential areas of improvement with a focus on the RS/GIS area. In 2019, a survey was conducted on alumni of the Postgraduate Diploma (PGD) programme of ARCSSTE-E. Based on the analysis of their responses and the progression of the PGD programme to a new Masters programme in RS/GIS at the university, there is clear evidence regarding the impact of the UNOOSA-assisted capacity building programme on the work and career of alumni, which has already produced an appreciable number of trained personnel in developing countries in Africa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Education and Training in Applied Remote Sensing)
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Open AccessArticle
COMET’s Education and Training for the Worldwide Meteorological Satellite User Community: Meeting Evolving Needs with Innovative Instruction
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(7), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8070311 - 20 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Since 1989, the COMET<sup>&#xAE;</sup> Program&#x2019;s staff of instructional designers, scientists, graphic artists, and web developers has been creating targeted, effective, and scientifically sound instructional materials for the geosciences in multiple languages and formats. The majority of COMET training materials and services are available [...] Read more.
Since 1989, the COMET<sup>&#xAE;</sup> Program&#x2019;s staff of instructional designers, scientists, graphic artists, and web developers has been creating targeted, effective, and scientifically sound instructional materials for the geosciences in multiple languages and formats. The majority of COMET training materials and services are available via COMET&#x2019;s online training portal, MetEd. MetEd hosts over 500 self-paced English-language lessons, which are freely available to registered users. The lessons cover a broad array of topics, including satellite meteorology, numerical weather prediction, hydrometeorology, oceanography, aviation weather, climate science, and decision support. Nearly 300 lessons have been translated to other languages. NOAA NESDIS, EUMETSAT, the Meteorological Service of Canada, and the US National Weather Service all provide funding and subject matter expertise for satellite training efforts at COMET. The COMET team is focused on helping our sponsors refine their learning objectives and produce instructional material that is focused on learner engagement, knowledge retention, and measurable performance improvement. The COMET Program has continually transformed its instructional approach to better meet the shifting needs of learners. Our satellite remote sensing educational and training materials provide sound foundational knowledge for existing and new satellite products paired with increasing opportunities to apply that knowledge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Education and Training in Applied Remote Sensing)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of the ARSET Program on Use of Remote-Sensing Data
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(6), 261; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8060261 - 04 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
We show that training activities conducted through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)’s Applied Remote-Sensing Training (ARSET) program led to a significant increase in remote-sensing data use for decision-making. Our findings are based on survey data collected from 1041 ARSET participants from [...] Read more.
We show that training activities conducted through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)’s Applied Remote-Sensing Training (ARSET) program led to a significant increase in remote-sensing data use for decision-making. Our findings are based on survey data collected from 1041 ARSET participants from 117 countries who attended ARSET trainings between 2013 and 2016. To assess the impact of the ARSET program, we analyzed changes in three metrics. Results show that 83% of all respondents increased their knowledge of remote-sensing data products at least moderately, 79% increased their ability to access data, and 73% increased their ability to make decisions. We also examined how respondents are using remote-sensing data across 40 specific work tasks ranging from research to decision support applications. More than 50% of respondents reported an increase in data use for all except two of the tasks. ARSET will use these findings, together with participant data on future training needs, to set future directions for the program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Education and Training in Applied Remote Sensing)
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Lessons Learned from the NOAA CoastWatch Ocean Satellite Course Developed for Integrating Oceanographic Satellite Data into Operational Use
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(8), 354; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8080354 - 10 Aug 2019
Abstract
Satellite data are underutilized in many branches of operational oceanography. Users outside of the satellite community often encounter difficulty in discovering the types of satellite measurements that are available, and determining which satellite products are best for operational activities. In addition, the large [...] Read more.
Satellite data are underutilized in many branches of operational oceanography. Users outside of the satellite community often encounter difficulty in discovering the types of satellite measurements that are available, and determining which satellite products are best for operational activities. In addition, the large choice of satellite data providers, each with their own data access protocols and formats, can make data access challenging. The mission of the NOAA CoastWatch Program is to make ocean satellite data easier to access and to apply to operational uses. As part of this mission, the West Coast Node of CoastWatch developed the NOAA Ocean Satellite Course, which introduces scientists and resource managers to ocean satellite products, and provides them tools to facilitate data access when using common analysis software. These tools leverage the data services provided by ERDDAP, a data distribution system designed to make data access easier via a graphical user interface and via machine-to-machine connections. The course has been offered annually since 2006 and has been attended by over 350 participants. Results of post-course surveys are analyzed to measure course effectiveness. The lessons learned from conducting these courses include using the preferred software of the course participants, providing easy access to datasets that are appropriate (fit for purpose) for operation applications, developing tools that address common tasks of the target audience, and minimizing the financial barriers to attend the course. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Education and Training in Applied Remote Sensing)
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