E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue"

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Wing Hong Chui

Department of Applied Social Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Hong Kong, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: youth violence; working with young offenders; criminology; youth justice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the World Health Organization, youth violence has clearly been recognized as a serious public health problem in almost all countries around the world. While some young people are the perpetrators of different forms of violence such as bullying and homicide, others are found as victims and/or witnesses of this violence. For instance, homicide is the fourth leading cause of death among young people aged 10–29. Victims of youth violence are often young people. Undoubtedly, a number of human service professionals and policymakers have been working hard to stop violence and to identify the most effective method of preventing youth violence. However, there is neither a quick solution nor a straightforward approach to preventing youth violence.

This Special Issue welcomes submissions that examine the role of personal, social and environmental influences in the etiology and prevention of youth violence. It also investigates the best practices of youth violence prevention. Special emphasis will be placed on the integration of theories, research and/or practice in illustrating how and what can be done to stop youth violence from a public health perspective.

Contributors from public health, criminology, criminal justice, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, public health, social work, and allied fields are encouraged to submit a full paper for publication. It is hope that this Issue will advance our understanding of youth violence and help identifying effective strategies to stop violence from a public health perspective.

Prof. Dr. Wing Hong Chui
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • violence as a public health issue
  • etiology of youth violence
  • risk and protective factors of youth violence
  • youth violence intervention
  • prevention of youth violence
  • new directions in violence prediction

Published Papers (15 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-15
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Problem Drinking, Alcohol-Related Violence, and Homelessness among Youth Living in the Slums of Kampala, Uganda
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1061; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061061
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 16 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1484 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines problem drinking, alcohol-related violence, and homelessness among youth living in the slums of Kampala—an understudied population at high-risk for both alcohol use and violence. This study is based on a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2014 with youth living in the [...] Read more.
This paper examines problem drinking, alcohol-related violence, and homelessness among youth living in the slums of Kampala—an understudied population at high-risk for both alcohol use and violence. This study is based on a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2014 with youth living in the slums and streets of Kampala, Uganda (n = 1134), who were attending Uganda Youth Development Link drop-in centers. The analyses for this paper were restricted to youth who reported current alcohol consumption (n = 346). Problem drinking patterns were assessed among youth involved in alcohol-related violence. Mediation analyses were conducted to examine the impact of homelessness on alcohol-related violence through different measures of problem drinking. Nearly 46% of youth who consumed alcohol were involved in alcohol-related violence. Problem drinkers were more likely to report getting in an accident (χ2 = 6.8, df = 1, p = 0.009), having serious problems with parents (χ2 = 21.1, df = 1, p < 0.0001) and friends (χ2 = 18.2, df = 1, p < 0.0001), being a victim of robbery (χ2 = 8.8, df = 1, p = 0.003), and going to a hospital (χ2 = 15.6, df = 1, p < 0.0001). For the mediation analyses, statistically significant models were observed for frequent drinking, heavy drinking, and drunkenness. Interventions should focus on delaying and reducing alcohol use in this high-risk population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Violent and Non-Violent Criminal Behavior among Young Chinese Drug Users: A Mixed Methods Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030432
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 27 February 2018 / Published: 2 March 2018
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (334 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Young drug users are found to be increasingly involved in criminal justice issues. This exploratory and descriptive study aims to analyze the criminal behaviors among young Chinese drug users through a mixed methods research design. Quantitative analysis indicates that young drug users with [...] Read more.
Young drug users are found to be increasingly involved in criminal justice issues. This exploratory and descriptive study aims to analyze the criminal behaviors among young Chinese drug users through a mixed methods research design. Quantitative analysis indicates that young drug users with and without a history of criminality show significant differences in terms of several features. Male drug users, particularly, those who are older, with religious beliefs, and initiated into drug use at younger age were most likely to commit crimes. Among drug users with criminal experiences, those who committed crimes prior to drug initiation have a greater likelihood of committing violent crimes. Furthermore, young drug users with severe depression are more likely to commit crimes, especially violent ones. Qualitative analysis further illustrates that young male drug users often get involved in criminal conduct of the youth gang nature with propensity for engaging in violent crimes as compared to their female counterparts who are more likely to turn into drug dealers and traffickers, in addition to engaging in larceny. The research findings are consistent with developmental theories and “victim to offender cycle”. Integrated mental health and substance use services are suggested for crime prevention among young Chinese drug users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
The Interrelationship between Family Violence, Adolescent Violence, and Adolescent Violent Victimization: An Application and Extension of the Cultural Spillover Theory in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020371
Received: 25 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 17 February 2018 / Published: 21 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (635 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The current study is the first study to emphasize family systems, violent norms, and violent peer association as three domains of the social environment that influence both adolescent violent offending and victimization among Chinese adolescents using a longitudinal sample. Under the framework of [...] Read more.
The current study is the first study to emphasize family systems, violent norms, and violent peer association as three domains of the social environment that influence both adolescent violent offending and victimization among Chinese adolescents using a longitudinal sample. Under the framework of cultural spillover theory, the purpose of the current study was to explore how these three factors influenced adolescent violent offending and victimization. A total of 1192 middle and high school students were randomly selected from one of the largest cities in Southwest China. Structural equation model analysis was applied to investigate the direct and indirect effect of violence in the family system on violent offending and victimization. The results indicated that violent offending and victimization overlapped among Chinese adolescents. Violent peer association and acceptance of the violence norm fully mediated the effect of violence in the family system on violent offending, and partially mediated the effect of violence in the family system on violent victimization. In conclusion, adolescents who had experienced violence in their family system were more likely to be exposed to violent peer influences and to accept violent norms, which increased the likelihood of violence perpetration and victimization later in their life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Bullying as a Stressor in Mid-Adolescent Girls and Boys–Associations with Perceived Stress, Recurrent Pain, and Salivary Cortisol
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 364; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020364
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 20 February 2018
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (471 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bullying involves repeated exposure to negative actions while also invoking a power asymmetry between the involved parties. From a stress perspective, being bullied can be seen as a severe and chronic stressor, and an everyday social-evaluative threat, coupled with a shortage of effective [...] Read more.
Bullying involves repeated exposure to negative actions while also invoking a power asymmetry between the involved parties. From a stress perspective, being bullied can be seen as a severe and chronic stressor, and an everyday social-evaluative threat, coupled with a shortage of effective social resources for dealing with this particular stressor. The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to bullying among mid-adolescent girls and boys is associated with subjective and objective stress-related outcomes in terms of perceived stress, recurrent pain, and salivary cortisol. The data came from the School Stress and Support Study (TriSSS) including students in grades 8–9 in two schools in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2010 (study sample n = 392; cortisol subsample n = 198). Bullying was self-reported and measured by multiple items. The statistical analyses included binary logistic and linear (OLS) regression. Being bullied was associated with greater perceived stress and an increased risk of recurrent pain, among both boys and girls. Also, bullied students had lower cortisol output (AUCG) and lower cortisol awakening response (CARG) as compared to those who were not bullied. Gender-stratified analyses demonstrated that these associations were statistically significant for boys but not for girls. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that being bullied was related to both subjective and objective stress markers among mid-adolescent girls and boys, pointing to the necessity of continuously working against bullying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Predicting Effects of the Self and Contextual Factors on Violence: A Comparison between School Students and Youth Offenders in Macau
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 258; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020258
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2018 / Accepted: 29 January 2018 / Published: 3 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (522 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study was designed to explore the self and contextual factors for violence in two samples of school students and youth offenders in Macau. There were 3085 participants who were between 12 and 20 years old; 48.3% of them were male and 51.7% [...] Read more.
This study was designed to explore the self and contextual factors for violence in two samples of school students and youth offenders in Macau. There were 3085 participants who were between 12 and 20 years old; 48.3% of them were male and 51.7% female. Findings revealed that youth offenders exhibited more violence than school students. For the self factors, while lower self-esteem and higher self-efficacy of school students were associated with more violent behavior, these two variables had no significant effects for youth offenders. For the contextual factors, family conflict was the strongest predictor of violence, and school commitment/attachment was the weakest predictor for both samples. For youth offenders, family conflict had the largest direct effect, followed by susceptibility to negative peer influence and influence of the Triad gangs, while school commitment/attachment had a significant though mild direct effect. For school students, family conflict mediated the effect of self-esteem and self-efficacy on violence. While Triad gangs’ influence was the second strongest predictor of violence, being exposed to Triad gangs’ influence also mediated the effect of self-esteem and self-efficacy on violence. It is recommended that youth outreach services with a focus on family support and gang detachment for at-risk youth be strengthened. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
School Contextual Features of Social Disorder and Mental Health Complaints—A Multilevel Analysis of Swedish Sixth-Grade Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010156
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (307 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study addressed school-contextual features of social disorder in relation to sixth-grade students’ experiences of bullying victimization and mental health complaints. It investigated, firstly, whether the school’s concentrations of behavioural problems were associated with individual students’ likelihood of being bullied, and secondly, whether [...] Read more.
This study addressed school-contextual features of social disorder in relation to sixth-grade students’ experiences of bullying victimization and mental health complaints. It investigated, firstly, whether the school’s concentrations of behavioural problems were associated with individual students’ likelihood of being bullied, and secondly, whether the school’s concentrations of behavioural problems and bullying victimization predicted students’ emotional and psychosomatic health complaints. The data were derived from the Swedish National Survey of Mental Health among Children and Young People, carried out among sixth-grade students (approximately 12–13 years old) in Sweden in 2009. The analyses were based on information from 59,510 students distributed across 1999 schools. The statistical method used was multilevel modelling. While students’ own behavioural problems were associated with an elevated risk of being bullied, attending a school with a higher concentration of students with behavioural problems also increased the likelihood of being bullied. Attending a school with higher levels of bullying victimization and behavioural problems predicted more emotional and psychosomatic complaints, even when adjusting for their individual level analogues. The findings indicate that school-level features of social disorder influence bullying victimization and mental health complaints among students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
School Collective Efficacy and Bullying Behaviour: A Multilevel Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1607; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121607
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 12 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 December 2017 / Published: 20 December 2017
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (284 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As with other forms of violent behaviour, bullying is the result of multiple influences acting on different societal levels. Yet the majority of studies on bullying focus primarily on the characteristics of individual bullies and bullied. Fewer studies have explored how the characteristics [...] Read more.
As with other forms of violent behaviour, bullying is the result of multiple influences acting on different societal levels. Yet the majority of studies on bullying focus primarily on the characteristics of individual bullies and bullied. Fewer studies have explored how the characteristics of central contexts in young people’s lives are related to bullying behaviour over and above the influence of individual-level characteristics. This study explores how teacher-rated school collective efficacy is related to student-reported bullying behaviour (traditional and cyberbullying victimization and perpetration). A central focus is to explore if school collective efficacy is related similarly to both traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Analyses are based on combined information from two independent data collections conducted in 2016 among 11th grade students (n = 6067) and teachers (n = 1251) in 58 upper secondary schools in Stockholm. The statistical method used is multilevel modelling, estimating two-level binary logistic regression models. The results demonstrate statistically significant between-school differences in all outcomes, except traditional bullying perpetration. Strong school collective efficacy is related to less traditional bullying perpetration and less cyberbullying victimization and perpetration, indicating that collective norm regulation and school social cohesion may contribute to reducing the occurrence of bullying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
Teacher Rated School Ethos and Student Reported Bullying—A Multilevel Study of Upper Secondary Schools in Stockholm, Sweden
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1565; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121565
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 11 December 2017 / Published: 13 December 2017
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (2747 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
School ethos refers to the school leadership’s purposive efforts to shape and direct the attitudes, values and behaviors needed in order to promote an active learning environment and to prevent the emergence of undesirable behaviors by creating shared meaning and common goals for [...] Read more.
School ethos refers to the school leadership’s purposive efforts to shape and direct the attitudes, values and behaviors needed in order to promote an active learning environment and to prevent the emergence of undesirable behaviors by creating shared meaning and common goals for the school. The aim of this study was to examine how teacher rated aspects of school ethos are linked with manifestations of bullying among 11th grade students. Five teacher-rated sub-dimensions of school ethos (staff stability, teacher morale, structure-order, student focus, and academic atmosphere) were examined in relation to student-reported perpetration of and exposure to traditional school bullying and cyberbullying. The data material combines student and teacher information from two separate data collections performed in 2016, comprising teachers and students in 58 upper secondary schools in Stockholm. Analyses showed that bullying was associated with all but one of the five sub-dimensions of school ethos, namely structure and order for dealing with bullying behaviors at the school. Results are discussed in light of this counter-intuitive finding. Our findings nevertheless lend support to the idea that the social organization of schools, as reflected in their teacher-rated ethos, can affect individual students’ attitudes in a way that prevents the emergence of bullying behavior among students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Physical Fighting and Associated Factors among Adolescents Aged 13–15 Years in Six Western Pacific Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1427; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111427
Received: 29 August 2017 / Revised: 17 November 2017 / Accepted: 18 November 2017 / Published: 21 November 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (308 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Youth violence is an important public health challenge around the world, yet the literature on this problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) has been limited. The present study aims to examine the prevalence of adolescent physical fighting (defined as having been involved [...] Read more.
Youth violence is an important public health challenge around the world, yet the literature on this problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) has been limited. The present study aims to examine the prevalence of adolescent physical fighting (defined as having been involved in at least one physical fight during the past 12 months) in selected LMICs, and its relations with potential risk factors. We included 6377 school-going adolescents aged 13–15 years from six Western Pacific (WP) countries that had recently conducted a Global School-based Student Health Survey. Information was gathered through a self-administered anonymous closed-ended questionnaire. The prevalence of adolescent physical fighting varied across countries, ranging from 34.5% in Kiribati to 63.3% in Samoa. The prevalence was higher in boys than in girls, and lower at age 15 than 13–14 years. Physical fighting was significantly associated (pooled odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs)) with smoking (1.78, 1.53–2.06), drinking (1.57, 1.33–1.85), drug use (1.72, 1.33–2.23), and missing school (1.72, 1.51–1.95). The association with physical fighting increased with increasing number of joint adverse behaviors (increased from 1.99 (1.73–2.29) for one risk behavior to 4.95 (4.03–6.07) for at least 3 risk behaviors, versus having none of the 4 risk behaviors). The high prevalence of physical fighting and the associations with risk behaviors emphasize the need for comprehensive prevention programs to reduce youth violence and associated risk behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
Peer Victimization among Classmates—Associations with Students’ Internalizing Problems, Self-Esteem, and Life Satisfaction
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1218; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101218
Received: 17 September 2017 / Revised: 5 October 2017 / Accepted: 6 October 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (269 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bullying is a major problem in schools and a large number of studies have demonstrated that victims have a high excess risk of poor mental health. It may however also affect those who are not directly victimized by peers. The present study investigates [...] Read more.
Bullying is a major problem in schools and a large number of studies have demonstrated that victims have a high excess risk of poor mental health. It may however also affect those who are not directly victimized by peers. The present study investigates whether peer victimization among classmates is linked to internalizing problems, self-esteem, and life satisfaction at the individual level, when the student’s own victimization has been taken into account. The data were derived from the first wave of the Swedish part of Youth in Europe Study (YES!), including information on 4319 students in grade 8 (14–15 years of age) distributed across 242 classes. Results from multilevel analyses show a significant association between classes with a high proportion of students being victimized and higher levels of internalizing problems, lower self-esteem, and lower life satisfaction at the student level. This association holds when the student’s own victimization has been taken into account. This suggests that peer victimization negatively affects those who are directly exposed, as well as their classmates. We conclude that efficient methods and interventions to reduce bullying in school are likely to benefit not only those who are victimized, but all students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
Negative Peer Relationships on Piracy Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Associations between Cyberbullying Involvement and Digital Piracy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101180
Received: 6 September 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 5 October 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (323 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study examines the relationship between different roles in cyberbullying behaviors (cyberbullies, cybervictims, cyberbullies-victims, and uninvolved) and self-reported digital piracy. In a region of central Spain, 643 (49.3% females, 50.7% males) students (grades 7–10) completed a number of self-reported measures, including cyberbullying [...] Read more.
The present study examines the relationship between different roles in cyberbullying behaviors (cyberbullies, cybervictims, cyberbullies-victims, and uninvolved) and self-reported digital piracy. In a region of central Spain, 643 (49.3% females, 50.7% males) students (grades 7–10) completed a number of self-reported measures, including cyberbullying victimization and perpetration, self-reported digital piracy, ethical considerations of digital piracy, time spent on the Internet, and leisure activities related with digital content. The results of a series of hierarchical multiple regression models for the whole sample indicate that cyberbullies and cyberbullies-victims are associated with more reports of digital piracy. Subsequent hierarchical multiple regression analyses, done separately for males and females, indicate that the relationship between cyberbullying and self-reported digital piracy is sustained only for males. The ANCOVA analysis show that, after controlling for gender, self-reported digital piracy and time spent on the Internet, cyberbullies and cyberbullies-victims believe that digital piracy is a more ethically and morally acceptable behavior than victims and uninvolved adolescents believe. The results provide insight into the association between two deviant behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
School Bullying in Urban China: Prevalence and Correlation with School Climate
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1116; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101116
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 13 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 25 September 2017
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (302 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
School violence and bullying in China is under investigated, though it has become a national concern recently. Using updated national representative survey data collected in 2016 from seven provinces across China, covering students from all pre-college school types (primary, middle, high and vocational [...] Read more.
School violence and bullying in China is under investigated, though it has become a national concern recently. Using updated national representative survey data collected in 2016 from seven provinces across China, covering students from all pre-college school types (primary, middle, high and vocational schools), this paper analyzes the prevalence of school bullying and the correlation with several school attributes. The incidences of reported bullying, bullying others and witnessing bullying are 26.10%, 9.03% and 28.90%, respectively. Primary school students are more likely to be involved in bullying behaviors. Students from elite schools (leading schools) are also more likely to be involved. Relation with teachers, relation with peers and perceived academic achievement are protective factors. Being a boy is the only significant predictor of school bullying among the family and demographic characteristics used. The results highlight the importance of school climate on preventing school violence and bullying, and a whole-school intervention approach is needed for future intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
Mother’s IPV, Child Maltreatment Type and the Presence of PTSD in Children and Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1077; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091077
Received: 27 July 2017 / Revised: 12 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 17 September 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (335 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This correlational cross-sectional study was designed to investigate whether the intimate partner violence (IPV) suffered by mothers (physical and psychological maltreatment), child eyewitness of psychological and physical maltreatment suffered by the mother, the neglect suffered by children, and the maltreatment (physical and psychological) [...] Read more.
This correlational cross-sectional study was designed to investigate whether the intimate partner violence (IPV) suffered by mothers (physical and psychological maltreatment), child eyewitness of psychological and physical maltreatment suffered by the mother, the neglect suffered by children, and the maltreatment (physical and psychological) directly suffered by children are statistically associated to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms exhibited by the child. In addition, the prevalence of child PTSD was estimated, as well as the concordance between the PTSD symptoms assessed by the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria for child PTSD. The sample consisted of 152 Spanish children aged 8 to 17 and their mothers, who were recruited from Centers of Specialized Assistance for Women Victims of IPV. PTSD prevalence was 20.4%. The results of a canonical correlation analysis showed that the two types of maltreatment with the largest contribution to the canonical variable were physical maltreatment directly suffered by the child, and child eyewitness of physical maltreatment suffered by the mother. The potential developmental pathway of PTSD when both children and mothers suffer severe maltreatment needs to be examined, and this will contribute to the choice of the most effective type of specialized intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
Bullying Behaviors among Macanese Adolescents—Association with Psychosocial Variables
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(8), 887; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14080887
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 2 August 2017 / Accepted: 4 August 2017 / Published: 7 August 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (335 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bullying is a widespread public health problem among school students. Using a large sample of Macanese school adolescents, the present study examines psychosocial conditions and demographic characteristics in discriminating the following four subgroups of students: victims; bullies; bully-victims; and a comparison group of [...] Read more.
Bullying is a widespread public health problem among school students. Using a large sample of Macanese school adolescents, the present study examines psychosocial conditions and demographic characteristics in discriminating the following four subgroups of students: victims; bullies; bully-victims; and a comparison group of adolescents. Participants included 2288 adolescents from 13 primary and secondary schools in Macau whose ages ranged from 10 to 20 years. Statistical results revealed significant differences among the groups and indicated that adolescents who are involved in school bullying experience worse psychosocial adjustment. Specifically, among the four subgroups of students, bully-victims reported the strongest feelings of anxiety, depression, and negative affectivity, and expressed the lowest satisfaction with life. Compared with students who were not involved in bullying and victimization, bullies experienced more anxiety and depression and victims had lower levels of satisfaction with life. In addition, boys were more likely to engage in bullying behaviors and younger students had a greater probability of being victimized by their peers at school. Implications for future research and practice on bullying perpetration and the prevention of peer victimization are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Open AccessArticle
Violence Victimization in Korean Adolescents: Risk Factors and Psychological Problems
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(5), 541; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14050541
Received: 1 April 2017 / Revised: 8 May 2017 / Accepted: 18 May 2017 / Published: 19 May 2017
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We examined the risk factors for and psychological problems associated with violence victimization in a nationwide representative sample of Korean adolescents. Data from the 2016 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey was used. Participants were asked about their experience of being a victim [...] Read more.
We examined the risk factors for and psychological problems associated with violence victimization in a nationwide representative sample of Korean adolescents. Data from the 2016 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey was used. Participants were asked about their experience of being a victim of violence that required medical treatment during the past 12 months, as well as their perceived health, happiness, sleep satisfaction, stress, depressed mood, and suicidality. The 12-month prevalence of violence victimization requiring medical treatment was 2.4%. The results indicated that adolescents were at an increased risk for violence victimization if they were male, older, had parents of a foreign nationality, did not reside with their family, worked part time, resided in small cities or rural areas, were high or low in socioeconomic status (SES), exhibited high or low levels of academic performance, used alcohol or tobacco, and were sexually active. In addition, while violence victimization was negatively associated with perceived health and happiness, it was positively associated with perceived stress, depressed mood, and suicidality. The results indicate that a social disadvantage, involvement in risky behavior, and psychological problems are associated with violence victimization. Effective violence prevention efforts should thus target high-risk groups, and clinical attention is needed to address the psychological costs associated with violence victimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top