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Negative Peer Relationships on Piracy Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Associations between Cyberbullying Involvement and Digital Piracy

Faculty of Education and Humanities, Department of Psychology, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda de los Alfares, 42, 16071 Cuenca, Spain
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101180
Received: 6 September 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 5 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Youth Violence as a Public Health Issue)
The present study examines the relationship between different roles in cyberbullying behaviors (cyberbullies, cybervictims, cyberbullies-victims, and uninvolved) and self-reported digital piracy. In a region of central Spain, 643 (49.3% females, 50.7% males) students (grades 7–10) completed a number of self-reported measures, including cyberbullying victimization and perpetration, self-reported digital piracy, ethical considerations of digital piracy, time spent on the Internet, and leisure activities related with digital content. The results of a series of hierarchical multiple regression models for the whole sample indicate that cyberbullies and cyberbullies-victims are associated with more reports of digital piracy. Subsequent hierarchical multiple regression analyses, done separately for males and females, indicate that the relationship between cyberbullying and self-reported digital piracy is sustained only for males. The ANCOVA analysis show that, after controlling for gender, self-reported digital piracy and time spent on the Internet, cyberbullies and cyberbullies-victims believe that digital piracy is a more ethically and morally acceptable behavior than victims and uninvolved adolescents believe. The results provide insight into the association between two deviant behaviors. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyberbullying; digital piracy; ethical behavior; adolescents; online violence cyberbullying; digital piracy; ethical behavior; adolescents; online violence
MDPI and ACS Style

Yubero, S.; Larrañaga, E.; Villora, B.; Navarro, R. Negative Peer Relationships on Piracy Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Associations between Cyberbullying Involvement and Digital Piracy. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1180. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101180

AMA Style

Yubero S, Larrañaga E, Villora B, Navarro R. Negative Peer Relationships on Piracy Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Associations between Cyberbullying Involvement and Digital Piracy. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(10):1180. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101180

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yubero, Santiago, Elisa Larrañaga, Beatriz Villora, and Raúl Navarro. 2017. "Negative Peer Relationships on Piracy Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study of the Associations between Cyberbullying Involvement and Digital Piracy" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14, no. 10: 1180. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101180

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