ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 October 2019) | Viewed by 51070

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Human Performance Management Group, Department of Industrial Engineering and Innovation Sciences, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600 Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Interests: work psychology; sports psychology; occupational health; employee well-being; job performance; physical/mental recovery; intervention studies; longitudinal research; employee sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Human Performance Management Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2. Department of Social, Health & Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.140, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: occupational health psychology; employee well-being; work–family balance; αging at work; job crafting; technological innovations at work

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vitality at work is an important factor for organizations to build a healthier, more engaged, more sustainable, and productive workforce. The organizational and societal relevance of vitality at work is high, particularly with regard to the aging workforce. Vitality at work has become an important research issue in the area of occupational safety and health. It can be considered a multifactorial construct and is studied in different scientific fields, such as psychology, sociology, organizational behavior, and medicine. At present, many researchers in these fields are highly interested in understanding how to optimize worker health and well-being. For organizations, the ultimate aim is to have staff consisting of vital workers—workers that are happy, healthy, and engaged. These vital workers are presumed to be productive workers as well. For that very reason, this Special Issue is focusing on what might be called sustainable performance: Maximizing work performance as well as worker health and well-being through vitality at work.

There are still many gaps of knowledge about the relation between vitality at work and sustainable performance—for instance, concerning potential determinants of vitality at work for different occupational groups (such as older workers, ethnic minority workers, and handicapped workers), pathways linking vitality to sustainable performance, or health effects of interventions targeting vitality at work and/or sustainable performance.

With this Special Issue, we invite you to submit high-quality original research articles or reviews that provide solid new findings extending the current state of knowledge of vitality at work and sustainable performance. We welcome papers related to evidence in different disciplines, such as organizational change, work (re)design, interpersonal relationships, successful prevention and intervention strategies (both in policy and in practice), as well as etiological research initiatives set in a variety of ‘at risk’ occupational settings, groups, and factors. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field.

Prof. Dr. J. (Jan) de Jonge
Prof. Dr. M.C.W. (Maria) Peeters
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vitality at work
  • sustainable performance
  • work engagement
  • aging workforce
  • interventions
  • work redesign
  • job crafting

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

6 pages, 276 KiB  
Editorial
The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work
by Jan de Jonge and Maria C.W. Peeters
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 910; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060910 - 13 Mar 2019
Cited by 53 | Viewed by 6659
Abstract
Vitality at work is an important factor for organizations to build a healthier, more engaged, sustainable, and productive workforce. The organizational and societal relevance of vitality at work is high, particularly with regard to an aging and more diverse workforce. This Special Issue [...] Read more.
Vitality at work is an important factor for organizations to build a healthier, more engaged, sustainable, and productive workforce. The organizational and societal relevance of vitality at work is high, particularly with regard to an aging and more diverse workforce. This Special Issue focusses on what might be called sustainable performance at work: Maximizing work performance as well as worker health and well-being through employee vitality. Currently, there are still many gaps of knowledge with regard to the relationship between employee vitality and sustainable performance at work. Examples of knowledge gaps are concerned with potential determinants of vitality at work for different occupational groups (such as older workers, ethnic minority workers, and handicapped workers), pathways linking vitality to sustainable performance, or health effects of interventions targeting employee vitality and/or sustainable performance at work. With this Special Issue, we hope to provide readers with solid new findings extending the current state of knowledge about employee vitality and sustainable work performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

21 pages, 858 KiB  
Article
Engaging Leadership and Its Implication for Work Engagement and Job Outcomes at the Individual and Team Level: A Multi-Level Longitudinal Study
by Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani, Wilmar B. Schaufeli, Jeroen Stouten, Zhenduo Zhang and Zulkarnain Zulkarnain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030776 - 26 Jan 2020
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 10417
Abstract
The current study investigates how supervisors’ engaging leadership, as perceived by their employees, increases employees’ job outcomes at the individual and team level, as mediated by (team) work engagement. Job outcome indicators at the team level are team performance, team learning, and team [...] Read more.
The current study investigates how supervisors’ engaging leadership, as perceived by their employees, increases employees’ job outcomes at the individual and team level, as mediated by (team) work engagement. Job outcome indicators at the team level are team performance, team learning, and team innovation; and at the individual level, job performance, employee learning, and innovative work behavior. The novel concept of engaging leadership is presented as the specific type of leadership to foster (team) work engagement. A multi-level longitudinal study is conducted among 224 blue collar employees nested in 54 teams in an Indonesian state-owned holding company in the agricultural industry using a one-year time lag. The findings show, as expected, that at the team level, engaging leadership at time 1 predicted team learning and team innovation (but not team performance) at time 2, via team work engagement at time 2. Additionally, an expected cross-level effect was observed from engaging leadership at the team level at time 1 predicting individual job performance (but not employee learning and innovative work behavior) at time 2, via team work engagement at time 2. Finally, an expected second cross-level effect was observed for engaging leadership at the team level at time 1, which predicted individual job performance, employee learning, and innovative work behavior at time 2, via work engagement at time 2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 352 KiB  
Article
Testing Demands and Resources as Determinants of Vitality among Different Employment Contract Groups. A Study in 30 European Countries
by Jari J. Hakanen, Annina Ropponen, Hans De Witte and Wilmar B. Schaufeli
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4951; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244951 - 6 Dec 2019
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 4072
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the relative importance of four job demands and five job resources for employee vitality, i.e., work engagement and exhaustion, in three different employment groups: permanent, temporary and temporary agency workers. We employed data from the [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the relative importance of four job demands and five job resources for employee vitality, i.e., work engagement and exhaustion, in three different employment groups: permanent, temporary and temporary agency workers. We employed data from the sixth European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) collected in 2015 comprising 28,042 employees from 30 European countries. We used linear regression analyses and dominance analysis (DA). The results showed minor mean differences in work engagement and exhaustion and that temporary agency workers had the highest job insecurity and lowest job control. The associations between job resources and job demands, and work engagement and exhaustion of the groups, did not differ considerably. DA showed that in all three employment groups, job feedback made the strongest contribution to work engagement and workload to exhaustion. In addition, among the temporary agency workers, supervisor support contributed to work engagement and job control (negatively) to exhaustion more than in the other groups. This study suggests that the key determinants of vitality at work may be similar, regardless of contract, and that to have sustainably performing vital workers, organizations should focus on enabling job feedback and preventing high workload in all employment groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
24 pages, 1518 KiB  
Article
Feeling Vital or Fatigued? Relations with Demands and Resources in a University Context
by Jan de Jonge, Maria C.W. Peeters and Toon W. Taris
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2893; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162893 - 13 Aug 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4000
Abstract
This study examines whether specific (matching) combinations of demands and resources exist in the prediction of both positive and negative outcomes (i.e., vitality and fatigue) in a university context. In addition, we test the Demand-Induced Strain Compensation (DISC) Model’s key principles in this [...] Read more.
This study examines whether specific (matching) combinations of demands and resources exist in the prediction of both positive and negative outcomes (i.e., vitality and fatigue) in a university context. In addition, we test the Demand-Induced Strain Compensation (DISC) Model’s key principles in this context to study its relevance, validity, and generalizability. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among 397 employees and 497 students at a Dutch university. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses among both employees and students showed matching combinations of demands and resources in the prediction of vitality and fatigue. Specifically, an increase in cognitive demands was particularly associated with more student cognitive vitality when cognitive resources were high. Furthermore, results showed that an increase in cognitive demands was related to less cognitive fatigue in both employees and students when cognitive resources were high. Findings partly confirm our hypotheses in showing the important role of matching resources in the relation between demands and vitality and fatigue in university staff and students. Our study reveals that a sustainable work environment is about maintaining a healthy balance between sufficient, matching resources and demands at work or study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1130 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Power Type, Work Engagement, and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors
by Kwang O. Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 1015; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061015 - 20 Mar 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4609
Abstract
The focus of this study is to investigate if power type improves organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) through work engagement. Based on existing research, power can be classified into two main types: coercive and non-coercive power. Coercive power is divided into the categories of [...] Read more.
The focus of this study is to investigate if power type improves organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) through work engagement. Based on existing research, power can be classified into two main types: coercive and non-coercive power. Coercive power is divided into the categories of coercion, reward, and legitimate power, and non-coercive power can be divided into information, expert, and reference power. Therefore, this study examines what kind of relationship is formed in the work engagement of organization members based on power type, and ultimately empirically investigates the effects on OCB. Although it is very important in organizational research, no study has yet been conducted on the relationships between power type, work engagement, and OCB. The survey targets of this study were the companies listed on the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI), a stock market in South Korea. The companies listed on the KOSPI are the representative companies of South Korea, as announced by the South Korean government based on their market representativeness, liquidity, and industry representativeness. This study sheds new light on the relationships between power type, work engagement, and OCB which have been overlooked from both the academic and practical perspectives. Based on this study, it is expected that power types that have practical influence will be further investigated, and the plans required for the maintenance of better relationships in an organization could then be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 949 KiB  
Article
Uncovering the Turnover Intention of Proactive Employees: The Mediating Role of Work Engagement and the Moderated Mediating Role of Job Autonomy
by Inyong Shin and Chang-Wook Jeung
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 843; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050843 - 8 Mar 2019
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 5158
Abstract
Retaining proactive employees with the potential to be high performers is recognized as an essential condition for an organization’s survival and prosperity. However, few studies have logically explained and empirically clarified the link between proactive personality, which represents a distal proactive tendency, and [...] Read more.
Retaining proactive employees with the potential to be high performers is recognized as an essential condition for an organization’s survival and prosperity. However, few studies have logically explained and empirically clarified the link between proactive personality, which represents a distal proactive tendency, and turnover intention to predict actual turnover behavior. With the research objective to address these research gaps, we expected that work engagement as a proximal motivational mechanism was likely to mediate the relationship between proactive personality and turnover intention, and that job autonomy as a critical job context was likely to moderate the relationship between proactive personality and work engagement. We developed a moderated mediation model incorporating these expectations. The results of the survey conducted on employees working for mid-sized manufacturing firms in Korea were consistent with our expectations. The findings of this study help uncover the intentions of turnover exhibited by proactive employees. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

18 pages, 1146 KiB  
Review
A Scoping Review of Digital Tools to Reduce Sedentary Behavior or Increase Physical Activity in Knowledge Workers
by Ida Damen, Hans Brombacher, Carine Lallemand, Rens Brankaert, Aarnout Brombacher, Pieter van Wesemael and Steven Vos
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 499; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020499 - 13 Jan 2020
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 8297
Abstract
Background: There is increasing interest in the role that technology can play in improving the vitality of knowledge workers. A promising and widely adopted strategy to attain this goal is to reduce sedentary behavior (SB) and increase physical activity (PA). In this paper, [...] Read more.
Background: There is increasing interest in the role that technology can play in improving the vitality of knowledge workers. A promising and widely adopted strategy to attain this goal is to reduce sedentary behavior (SB) and increase physical activity (PA). In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art SB and PA interventions using technology in the office environment. By scoping the existing landscape, we identified current gaps and underexplored possibilities. We discuss opportunities for future development and research on SB and PA interventions using technology. Methods: A systematic search was conducted in the Association for Computing Machinery digital library, the interdisciplinary library Scopus, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Xplore Digital Library to locate peer-reviewed scientific articles detailing SB and PA technology interventions in office environments between 2009 and 2019. Results: The initial search identified 1130 articles, of which 45 studies were included in the analysis. Our scoping review focused on the technologies supporting the interventions, which were coded using a grounded approach. Conclusion: Our findings showed that current SB and PA interventions using technology provide limited possibilities for physically active ways of working as opposed to the common strategy of prompting breaks. Interventions are also often offered as additional systems or services, rather than integrated into existing office infrastructures. With this work, we have mapped different types of interventions and provide an increased understanding of the opportunities for future multidisciplinary development and research of technologies to address sedentary behavior and physical activity in the office context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 678 KiB  
Review
Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Sustainable Employability: A Systematic Review
by Emmelie Hazelzet, Eleonora Picco, Inge Houkes, Hans Bosma and Angelique de Rijk
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 1985; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16111985 - 4 Jun 2019
Cited by 37 | Viewed by 6692
Abstract
Background: Despite growing interest in sustainable employability (SE), studies on the effectiveness of interventions aimed at employees’ SE are scarce. In this review, SE is defined by four core components: health, productivity, valuable work, and long-term perspective. The aim of this review is [...] Read more.
Background: Despite growing interest in sustainable employability (SE), studies on the effectiveness of interventions aimed at employees’ SE are scarce. In this review, SE is defined by four core components: health, productivity, valuable work, and long-term perspective. The aim of this review is to summarize the effectiveness of employer-initiated SE interventions and to analyze whether their content and outcome measures addressed these SE components. Methods: A systematic search was performed in six databases for the period January 1997 to June 2018. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed. A customized form was used to extract data and categorize interventions according to SE components. Results: The initial search identified 596 articles and 7 studies were included. Methodological quality ranged from moderate to weak. All interventions addressed the components ‘health’ and ‘valuable work’. Positive effects were found for ‘valuable work’ outcomes. Conclusions: The quality of evidence was moderate to weak. The ‘valuable work’ component appeared essential for the effectiveness of SE interventions. Higher-quality evaluation studies are needed, as are interventions that effectively integrate all SE core components in their content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop