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Feeling Vital or Fatigued? Relations with Demands and Resources in a University Context
Article

Testing Demands and Resources as Determinants of Vitality among Different Employment Contract Groups. A Study in 30 European Countries

1
Workability and Work Careers, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, BOX 40, 00032 Helsinki, Finland
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Research Unit Occupational & Organizational Psychology and Professional Learning, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
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Optentia Research Focus Area, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark 1900, South Africa
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Department of Social, Health & Organizational Psychology, Utrecht University, 3584 CH Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4951; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244951
Received: 13 September 2019 / Revised: 22 November 2019 / Accepted: 4 December 2019 / Published: 6 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
The aim of this study was to investigate the relative importance of four job demands and five job resources for employee vitality, i.e., work engagement and exhaustion, in three different employment groups: permanent, temporary and temporary agency workers. We employed data from the sixth European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) collected in 2015 comprising 28,042 employees from 30 European countries. We used linear regression analyses and dominance analysis (DA). The results showed minor mean differences in work engagement and exhaustion and that temporary agency workers had the highest job insecurity and lowest job control. The associations between job resources and job demands, and work engagement and exhaustion of the groups, did not differ considerably. DA showed that in all three employment groups, job feedback made the strongest contribution to work engagement and workload to exhaustion. In addition, among the temporary agency workers, supervisor support contributed to work engagement and job control (negatively) to exhaustion more than in the other groups. This study suggests that the key determinants of vitality at work may be similar, regardless of contract, and that to have sustainably performing vital workers, organizations should focus on enabling job feedback and preventing high workload in all employment groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: employment contracts; vitality at work; well-being; work engagement; exhaustion; burnout; job demands–resources model; Europe employment contracts; vitality at work; well-being; work engagement; exhaustion; burnout; job demands–resources model; Europe
MDPI and ACS Style

Hakanen, J.J.; Ropponen, A.; De Witte, H.; Schaufeli, W.B. Testing Demands and Resources as Determinants of Vitality among Different Employment Contract Groups. A Study in 30 European Countries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4951. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244951

AMA Style

Hakanen JJ, Ropponen A, De Witte H, Schaufeli WB. Testing Demands and Resources as Determinants of Vitality among Different Employment Contract Groups. A Study in 30 European Countries. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(24):4951. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244951

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hakanen, Jari J., Annina Ropponen, Hans De Witte, and Wilmar B. Schaufeli. 2019. "Testing Demands and Resources as Determinants of Vitality among Different Employment Contract Groups. A Study in 30 European Countries" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 24: 4951. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244951

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