Next Article in Journal
Work Fatigue in a Non-Deployed Military Setting: Assessment, Prevalence, Predictors, and Outcomes
Previous Article in Journal
Impacts of Nutrition Subsidies on Diet Diversity and Nutritional Outcomes of Primary School Students in Rural Northwestern China—Do Policy Targets and Incentives Matter?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Sustainable Employability: A Systematic Review
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Feeling Vital or Fatigued? Relations with Demands and Resources in a University Context

1
Human Performance Management Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, MB, NL-5600 Eindhoven, The Netherlands
2
Department of Social, Health and Organisational Psychology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80140, TC, NL-3508 Utrecht, The Netherlands
3
School of Psychology, Asia Pacific Centre for Work Health and Safety, University of South Australia, P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide 5001, South Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2893; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162893
Received: 17 April 2019 / Revised: 1 August 2019 / Accepted: 8 August 2019 / Published: 13 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Vital Worker: Towards Sustainable Performance at Work)
  |  
PDF [1518 KB, uploaded 13 August 2019]
  |  

Abstract

This study examines whether specific (matching) combinations of demands and resources exist in the prediction of both positive and negative outcomes (i.e., vitality and fatigue) in a university context. In addition, we test the Demand-Induced Strain Compensation (DISC) Model’s key principles in this context to study its relevance, validity, and generalizability. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among 397 employees and 497 students at a Dutch university. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses among both employees and students showed matching combinations of demands and resources in the prediction of vitality and fatigue. Specifically, an increase in cognitive demands was particularly associated with more student cognitive vitality when cognitive resources were high. Furthermore, results showed that an increase in cognitive demands was related to less cognitive fatigue in both employees and students when cognitive resources were high. Findings partly confirm our hypotheses in showing the important role of matching resources in the relation between demands and vitality and fatigue in university staff and students. Our study reveals that a sustainable work environment is about maintaining a healthy balance between sufficient, matching resources and demands at work or study. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitality; vigor; fatigue; demands; resources; DISC Model; job redesign; university staff; university students vitality; vigor; fatigue; demands; resources; DISC Model; job redesign; university staff; university students
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

de Jonge, J.; Peeters, M.C.; Taris, T.W. Feeling Vital or Fatigued? Relations with Demands and Resources in a University Context. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2893.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top