E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Stigma, Health and Wellbeing"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Chung-Ying Lin

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Website | E-Mail
Interests: patient-reported outcomes; childhood adversity and mental health in children/adolescents; therapeutic effects on people with mental illness; psychometric testing
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hector Tsang

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Website | E-Mail
Interests: neuropsychiatric and vocational rehabilitation for individuals with mental illness; mental illness stigma; psychophysiology of mind-body interventions

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The modern world has made health technologies and medications available that lead to cures for diseases and health enhancement. The life expectancy among populations in different locations of the world has significantly increased; however, psychosocial health remains an important problem in our communities.

One of the important issues in psychosocial health is stigma, which can be conceptualized as the co-occurrence of the following: (i) distinguishing differences and labeling; (ii) negatively stereotyping those who are labeled as different; (iii) separating labeled people from unlabeled people (e.g., using “us” vs. “them”); (iv) emotional reactions, such as anger and hatred, among both those who do the labelling and those who are labeled; (v) the labeled group experiencing status loss and discrimination, and; (vi) economic, social, political, and power that enables these processes to unfold. Stigma may manifest itself in various forms: public stigma, experienced stigma, perceived stigma, and self-stigma. As long as any type of stigma exists, it poses a great threat to the health and well-being of those who are stigmatized. The results will include loss of opportunities in various aspects of life such as the availability of treatment, employment, housing, education. All of these aspects are important components of quality of life. Unfortunately, the link between stigma and health is still not fully understood. Therefore, we need more evidence to help healthcare providers to better understand the issue among populations in different parts of the world.

In this Special Issue, we intend to address this knowledge gap and invite the submission of papers that explore and shed light on the relationship between stigma and any aspect of health. Reviews, observational studies, case vignettes, and randomized experimental trials are welcome. If you have an idea and do not know whether this falls into the scope of this Special Issue, you may contact either one of the Guest Editors: Dr. Chung-Ying Lin, or Prof. Hector Tsang.

Dr. Chung-Ying Lin
Prof. Dr. Hector Tsang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Help-seeking behavior
  • Physical health
  • Prejudice
  • Psychosocial health
  • Quality of life
  • Stigma
  • Well-being

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Body as an Object of Stigmatization in Cultures of Guilt and Shame: A Polish–Vietnamese Comparison
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2814; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162814
Received: 10 July 2019 / Revised: 2 August 2019 / Accepted: 5 August 2019 / Published: 7 August 2019
PDF Full-text (1384 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to examine cross-cultural differences in body stigmatization between the individualistic Christian culture of guilt (Poland) and the collectivistic Buddhist/Confucian culture of honor and shame (Vietnam). The study included 1290 university students from Poland (n = 586) [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to examine cross-cultural differences in body stigmatization between the individualistic Christian culture of guilt (Poland) and the collectivistic Buddhist/Confucian culture of honor and shame (Vietnam). The study included 1290 university students from Poland (n = 586) and Vietnam (n = 704). Subjects filled in the body esteem scale and the perceived stigmatization questionnaire, and body measurements were collected to calculate anthropometric indices. Participants from Vietnam were less satisfied with their appearance than their Polish peers. Men in both countries assessed themselves more favorably. No anthropometric index predicted body esteem in Vietnamese women, while only indices related to fat levels were predictors in Polish women. Men with a V-shaped body assessed themselves as stronger and as having a better physical condition. A possible explanation of the observed cross-cultural differences is that interdependent self-construal makes young adults in collectivistic societies more susceptible to criticism, and the Confucian values of modesty and shame lead to them not perceiving their bodies as sexual objects. The Christian sense of guilt does not influence the perception of sexuality. Absence of friendly behavior mediated the relation between anthropometric indices and body esteem in both cultures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stigma, Health and Wellbeing)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Male’s Intentions to Recommend Professional Help-Seeking for Emotional Problems to Their Partner in the Postpartum Period: The Direct and Indirect Effects of Gender Role Conflict, Stigma and Experiential Avoidance
Authors: Catarina Luís 1, Maria Cristina Canavarro 2 and Ana Fonseca 2,*
Affiliations: 1 Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal; 2 Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive-Behavior Intervention (CINEICC), Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top