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Open AccessArticle

Parental Support, Beliefs about Mental Illness, and Mental Help-Seeking among Young Adults in Saudi Arabia

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Nursing Public Health, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589, Saudi Arabia
2
Nursing Mental Health, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589, Saudi Arabia
3
Nursing, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589, Saudi Arabia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5615; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155615
Received: 20 June 2020 / Revised: 1 August 2020 / Accepted: 3 August 2020 / Published: 4 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stigma, Health and Wellbeing)
Mental illness is not uncommon among young adults, but negative attitudes towards mental disorders and lack of parental support might be associated with hesitancy in seeking professional help. This study aimed to examine the relationships of parental support, beliefs about mental illness, and mental help-seeking among young adults in Saudi Arabia. This quantitative cross-sectional study included a convenience sample of 236 young adults (ages 18–25) with the majority of the total (86.4%) being female. Data were collected via three self-administered questionnaires: The Perceived Parental Support Scale, Beliefs toward Mental Illness scale, and Mental Help Seeking Attitude Scale. Results indicated that the participants had a moderately negative attitude toward mental illness, a moderately positive attitude toward parental support, and a highly positive attitude toward mental help-seeking. No significant relationships were found among the study variables. The study highlights that despite young adults’ positive attitude toward mental help-seeking and parental support, they have negative views toward people with mental illnesses. Educational programs in schools and media are needed to improve attitudes and enhance readiness to interact with people with mental illness. View Full-Text
Keywords: cross-sectional; beliefs; mental help-seeking; mental illness; parental support; young adults cross-sectional; beliefs; mental help-seeking; mental illness; parental support; young adults
MDPI and ACS Style

Mahsoon, A.; Sharif, L.; Banakhar, M.; Alasmee, N.; Almowallad, E.; Jabali, R.; Bahamil, A.; Assur, S. Parental Support, Beliefs about Mental Illness, and Mental Help-Seeking among Young Adults in Saudi Arabia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5615.

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