Special Issue "Sport-Related Concussions in Children and Adolescents"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Dilipkumar R. Patel
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, School of Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI, USA
Interests: pediatric sports medicine; neurodevelopmental disabilities; neurobehavioral disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on Sport-Related Concussions in Children and Adolescents in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Sports are an integral part of the sociocultural fabric of society since ancient times. For children and adolescents, participation in sports comes naturally and plays a vital role in their growth and development. Different types of injuries are inherent to sport participation with varying degrees of short-term and long-term consequences for the child and the adolescent athlete. An additional unique dimension to sports participation by children and adolescents is derived from the role adults play in providing the framework and context within which such participation takes place.

Our understanding of the impact of sport-related concussions on the developing brain of children and adolescent continues evolve. Sport-related concussions are a common injury with wide-ranging short-term and long-term consequences for the child or the adolescent.

An understanding of the epidemiological factors, neurodevelopmental impact, public health impact, prevention strategies, clinical management, recovery, and rehabilitation are some of the areas of critical interest in sport-related concussions in children and adolescents.

This Special Issue is open to a wide-ranging subject areas related to sport-related concussions in children and adolescents, especially prevention, public policy and public health aspects.

The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. Dr. Dilipkumar R. Patel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Definition
  • Pathophysiology
  • Neurodevelopmental impact
  • Neurocognitive testing
  • Cognitive rest
  • Return to play
  • Neuroimaging
  • Public policy
  • Prevention
  • Epidemiology
  • Ethical considerations

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Concussion Education Programs for Coaches and Parents of Youth Athletes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2665; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082665 - 13 Apr 2020
Abstract
Coach and parent concussion education programs are essential for the prevention, diagnosis, management, and return to play of youth athletes. This systematic review examined the content and efficacy (changes in knowledge, impact on concussion incidence) of concussion education programs for coaches and parents [...] Read more.
Coach and parent concussion education programs are essential for the prevention, diagnosis, management, and return to play of youth athletes. This systematic review examined the content and efficacy (changes in knowledge, impact on concussion incidence) of concussion education programs for coaches and parents of youth and high school athletes. Six databases were searched: SPORTDiscus, Academic Search Premiere, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Google Scholar. Studies evaluated the use and/or efficacy of concussion education programs among coaches or parents of youth athletes. A total of 13 articles (out of 1553 articles) met selection criteria. Although different concussion education programs exist, only three have been evaluated in the literature: ACTive Athletic Concussion Training™, USA Football’s Heads Up Football, and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s HEADS UP. These programs are well liked among coaches and parents and the suggested practices are easily implemented by coaches. These programs increased concussion knowledge among coaches and parents and promoted behavioral changes among coaches to reduce the concussion risk in high school sports. Few studies have assessed the efficacy of concussion education programs on youth athlete health outcomes. No studies included a longitudinal follow up to determine the degree of knowledge retention following the intervention. While online educational programs are sufficient to improve coach knowledge, in-person training may be a more effective educational tool for reducing the incidence of youth sport concussion. Future studies addressing the efficacy of concussion education programs should include a longitudinal follow up to assess knowledge retention and fidelity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport-Related Concussions in Children and Adolescents)
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