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From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2023) | Viewed by 27190

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Human Biology, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Wroclaw University of Health and Sport Sciences, I.J. Paderewskiego Av. 35, 51-612 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: BMI at different ages; body composition; physical activity and body composition; childhood physioprophylaxis; therapeutic programs for overweight and obese children, adults, seniors; healthy aging—tertiary prophylaxis

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Co-Guest Editor
Faculty of Physiotherapy, Wroclaw University of Health and Sport Sciences, 35 Paderewskiego Street, 51-612 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: factors influencing the effectiveness of rehabilitation of patients with chronic diseases; the use of various forms of therapy, tools to improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation and the quality of life of patients in different age; psychophysical condition of pregnant women; the relationship between physical activity and cognitive-emotional state of patients

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A modern concept of rehabilitation is holistic activities that aim to improve not only the physical but also mental condition of patients of different ages, using a variety of innovative physiotherapeutic methods combined with psychotherapeutics, occupational therapy and cosmetology. Therefore, the aim of the conference is to debate and share the experiences of specialists in the field of medical sciences, physical sciences, and health and social sciences regarding the latest achievements in the field of broadly understood rehabilitation, the treatment and prevention of people of all ages ranging from the youngest to the most senior. The overarching idea of the conference is the presentation and dissemination of both existing and new methods of the practical application of research results in everyday practice. The conference - 11th The International Days of Physiotherapy “From junior to senior – physiotherapy connects generations” is an attempt to draw attention to the important and current problems of rehabilitation and treatment, as well as to broadly understand the prevention of diseases in both healthy and sick people in the modern world. During this scientific event, we will discuss the most current trends that are a response to changes occurring in the human environment in the context of the contemporary development of civilization and science combined with practice.

Main topics:

  • Physiotherapy in the COVID-19 era;
  • The use of modern technologies in rehabilitation and therapy;
  • Primary and secondary prevention of civilization diseases;
  • Quality and lifestyle at different stages of life in the light of comprehensive rehabilitation;
  • Modern physiotherapy in childhood diseases, cancer and diseases of the nervous system;
  • Modern physiotherapy in internal diseases and diseases of the musculoskeletal system;
  • Ethics in medical, therapeutic and cosmetology services;
  • The importance of occupational therapy in comprehensive rehabilitation at different stages of life;
  • Cosmetology, dermocosmetology, and aesthetic cosmetology.

Prof. Dr. Agnieszka Chwałczyńska
Prof. Dr. Joanna Kowalska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • holistic rehabilitation
  • psychophysical state
  • disease prevention
  • treatment of diseases
  • civilization diseases
  • development of civilization
  • physical activity
  • aging
  • social well-being
  • physioprophylaxis

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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8 pages, 1169 KiB  
Article
Texting on a Smartphone While Walking Affects Gait Parameters
by Julia Sajewicz and Alicja Dziuba-Słonina
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4590; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054590 - 05 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1575
Abstract
Cell phone use while walking is an ever-increasing traffic hazard, and leads to an augmented risk of accidents. There is a rising number of injuries to pedestrians using a cell phone. Texting on a cell phone while walking is an emerging problem among [...] Read more.
Cell phone use while walking is an ever-increasing traffic hazard, and leads to an augmented risk of accidents. There is a rising number of injuries to pedestrians using a cell phone. Texting on a cell phone while walking is an emerging problem among people of different ages. The aim of this experiment was to investigate whether using a cell phone while walking affects walking velocity, as well as cadence, stride width, and length in young people. Forty-two subjects (20 males, 22 females; mean age: 20.74 ± 1.34 years; mean height: 173.21 ± 8.07 cm; mean weight: 69.05 ± 14.07 kg) participated in the study. The subjects were asked to walk on an FDM−1.5 dynamometer platform four times at a constant comfortable velocity and a fast velocity of their choice. They were asked to continuously type one sentence on a cell phone while walking at the same velocity. The results showed that texting while walking led to a significant reduction in velocity compared to walking without the phone. Width, cadence, and length of right and left single steps were statistically significantly influenced by this task. In conclusion, such changes in gait parameters may result in an increased risk of pedestrian crossing accidents and tripping while walking. Phone use is an activity that should be avoided while walking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
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13 pages, 391 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Level of Physical Activity and Mood in Students after a Year of Study in a Mixed Mode in the Conditions of Restrictions Resulting from the Pandemic
by Małgorzata Stefańska, Reninka De Koker, Jeroen Vos, Eveline De Wachter, Agnieszka Dębiec-Bąk and Agnieszka Ptak
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4311; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054311 - 28 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1447
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced social isolation affecting all areas of life. It also affected the functioning of schools and universities. Many countries have introduced full or partial distance learning. The aim of the study was to assess the level of physical activity [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced social isolation affecting all areas of life. It also affected the functioning of schools and universities. Many countries have introduced full or partial distance learning. The aim of the study was to assess the level of physical activity and student mood of the Faculty of Physiotherapy of the Academy of Physical Education in Wrocław (Poland) and students of the Faculty of Health of the ODISSE University in Brussels (Belgium) after a year of the study conducted in a mixed mode due to contact restrictions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and checking which of the analyzed factors increases the risk of depression to the greatest extent. Material and methods: 297 students from the 2nd to 4th year of full-time studies took part in the observation. The academic year 2020/2021 was assessed. Physical activity was assessed using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) recommended for this type of analysis by WHO. The GPAQ questionnaire enables the assessment of activity performed at work, movement, and leisure time and assesses the time of sitting or resting in a supine position. The Beck Depression Inventory was used to assess mental health. The subjects also completed a questionnaire concerning selected somatic features and describing their living conditions in the previous year. Results: In the group of Polish students, classes conducted in a completely remote mode accounted for about 50%, while in the group of Belgian students, about 75%. In the described period, 19% of students from Poland and 22% of students from Belgium were infected with COVID-19. The median of the results of the Beck Depression Scale in both groups was lower than 12 points (7 points in the AWF group and 8 points in the ODISSE group, respectively). A detailed analysis showed that in both study groups, more than 30% of students received results showing a depressed mood. A total of 19% of the surveyed students of the University of Physical Education and 27% of the ODISSE students were characterized by a result indicating mild depression. The results of the GPAQ questionnaire show that the total physical activity, including work/study, recreation, and mobility was 16.5 h a week for students from Poland and 7.4 h a week for students from Belgium. Conclusions: Both groups of subjects reached all the thresholds recommended by the WHO as a sufficient level of weekly physical activity. A group of students of the Faculty of Physiotherapy of the University of Physical Education in Wrocław was characterized by more than twice as high (statistically significant) level of weekly physical activity as compared to the group of participants from the ODISSE University in Brussels. In both study groups, more than 30% of students experienced a lowered mood of varying intensity. It is necessary to monitor the mental state of students and, in the event of obtaining control results at a similar level, to implement psychological assistance for willing participants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
9 pages, 304 KiB  
Article
The Ethical Code of Conduct for Physiotherapists—An Axiological Analysis
by Krzysztof Pezdek and Robert Dobrowolski
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021362 - 12 Jan 2023
Viewed by 2118
Abstract
The goal of the article is an axiological analysis of the Ethical Code of Conduct for Physiotherapists. The basic ethical values constituting the axiological basis of physiotherapy are care, professionalism, responsibility, fairness, professional integrity, respect for a patient/client’s dignity and autonomy. Those values [...] Read more.
The goal of the article is an axiological analysis of the Ethical Code of Conduct for Physiotherapists. The basic ethical values constituting the axiological basis of physiotherapy are care, professionalism, responsibility, fairness, professional integrity, respect for a patient/client’s dignity and autonomy. Those values have been selected from the theory and practice of physiotherapy, but also from socio-cultural conditions influencing the relations and interdependencies between physiotherapists and other professional groups or society as a whole. Those values can exist as qualities of a subject (a physiotherapist) or as functions realised by them (acting for the welfare of a patient/client, society, profession). Some of the analysed values have been directly enumerated in the Ethical Code of Conduct for Physiotherapists, while others must be deduced from the rules included in this document. The analysed values should be internalised by the physiotherapists during their training and professional practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
10 pages, 545 KiB  
Article
Virtual Therapy Complementary Prehabilitation of Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer—A Pilot Study
by Oliver Czech, Katarzyna Siewierska, Aleksandra Krzywińska, Jakub Skórniak, Adam Maciejczyk, Rafał Matkowski, Joanna Szczepańska-Gieracha and Iwona Malicka
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010722 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2134
Abstract
Breast cancer is becoming an important issue due to its various consequences and epidemiology. Studies are showing that it extremely impacts the mental health as well as the physical activity of the patients. In addition to the most common symptom, which is fatigue, [...] Read more.
Breast cancer is becoming an important issue due to its various consequences and epidemiology. Studies are showing that it extremely impacts the mental health as well as the physical activity of the patients. In addition to the most common symptom, which is fatigue, patients also have problems with the quality of sleep. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) therapy in improving the mental state and quality of sleep, as well as increasing the physical activity (PA) of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. The study was conducted in a hospital’s Breast Unit and included patients at the time of diagnosis of malignant breast cancer. A total of 16 subjects randomly divided into experimental (n = 9), and control (n = 7) groups were measured with the Beck Depression Scale, Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale, International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index at two timepoints. The experimental intervention consisted of a 2-week (8 sessions) Virtual Therapeutic Garden (VRTierOne) procedure performed daily for about 15 min. Significant differences were identified between groups in the interactions between the main factors seen in the destructive style of the Mini-Mac scale: F(1.14) = 4.82, p = 0.04, and between multiple experiments: F(1.14)= 5.54, p = 0.03 showing a significant reduction in the destructive style of coping with the disease in the study group after therapy (32.44 vs. 28.33, p = 0.003). The level of main effects [study] for the constructive style is F(1.14) = 3.93, p = 0.06 with a significant increase in constructive style in the study group (43.33 vs. 45.33, p = 0.044). Significant differences in levels of depression between multiple experiments: F(1.14) = 5.04, p = 0.04, show a significant reduction in the severity of depressive symptoms was found in the experimental group after therapy (13.33 vs. 8.11, p = 0.02). However, the analysis did not show significant differences between group analyses (p = 0.25). It seems that VR reduces the severity of depressive symptoms and reduces the destructive style and can be an effective option in improving the mental state of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
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11 pages, 2421 KiB  
Article
Interdisciplinary Cooperation in Technical, Medical, and Social Sciences: A Focus on Creating Accessibility
by Dominika Zawadzka, Natalia Ratajczak-Szponik and Bożena Ostrowska
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16669; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416669 - 12 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1822
Abstract
Accessibility and Universal Design (UD) is an area of professional interest for architects and occupational therapists, but college curricula rarely include both broader and collaborative education in this area. This article presents the experience of the inter-university, interdisciplinary project “Joint Architecture Initiative” (JAI), [...] Read more.
Accessibility and Universal Design (UD) is an area of professional interest for architects and occupational therapists, but college curricula rarely include both broader and collaborative education in this area. This article presents the experience of the inter-university, interdisciplinary project “Joint Architecture Initiative” (JAI), with the participation of students from the University of Science and Technology, University of Health and Sport Science, and Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw (Poland). The JAI project is a response of the university community of Wroclaw to the social-urban campaign “Life Without Barriers” and the needs of residents—the elderly and people with disabilities—for adaptation and modification of housing. The paper presents the theoretical background of the problem, the stages of implementation of the JAI project from the perspective of the model—human–environment–occupation—the tasks of project team members, and the justification for the need to create interdisciplinary teams from the area of technical and health sciences, with particular emphasis on occupational therapy practice (OTP). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
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7 pages, 296 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Skinfold Thickness Measured by Caliper and Ultrasound Scanner in Normative Weight Women
by Zdzisław Lewandowski, Ewelina Dychała, Agnieszka Pisula-Lewandowska and Dariusz P. Danel
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(23), 16230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192316230 - 04 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1915
Abstract
Obesity is a major issue affecting not only adults but also children in many places of the world. There are numerous methods for estimating the body fat percentage, however, all of those methods are different in terms of availability, accuracy, and the cost [...] Read more.
Obesity is a major issue affecting not only adults but also children in many places of the world. There are numerous methods for estimating the body fat percentage, however, all of those methods are different in terms of availability, accuracy, and the cost of an individual examination. The aim of this study was to compare two relatively easy and widespread measurement methods for assessing skinfold thickness: the BodyMetrix BX2000 ultrasound machine and a classic GPM caliper. Fifty-eight young women aged 19–24 years with normative body weight participated in the study. We found that although the measurements performed by both methods are positively correlated, the obtained values were different. In seven out of nine measured points, these differences were statistically significant. The measurements of skin fat folds with a caliper showed a higher value of subcutaneous tissue compared to ultrasound measurements. Only the values of measurements on the pectoral and mid-axillary did not differ between the methods. We conclude that due to the significant discrepancies in the values of measured skinfold thickness, appropriate measurement tools and dedicated formulas estimating the amount of body fat should be used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
11 pages, 376 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Emotional State of Parents of Children Starting the Vojta Therapy in the Context of the Physical Activity—A Pilot Study
by Kinga Strojek, Dorota Wójtowicz and Joanna Kowalska
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10691; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710691 - 27 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1691
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the emotional state of parents at the moment of starting therapy for their children using the Vojta method in the context of the physical activity undertaken by the parents. The study involved 68 parents (37 [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess the emotional state of parents at the moment of starting therapy for their children using the Vojta method in the context of the physical activity undertaken by the parents. The study involved 68 parents (37 mothers and 31 fathers) of children with central coordination disorders (CCD) presenting for consultation and therapy using the Vojta method. The authors’ questionnaires, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), and the Inventory to Measure Coping Strategies with Stress (Mini-COPE) were used. As many as 84% of mothers and 77% of fathers presented high level of perceived stress. Comparative analysis showed a statistically significant difference in anxiety and life satisfaction between the groups of mothers and fathers studied. Taking declared physical activity into account, there was a statistically significant difference in stress and anxiety in the mothers’ group and a statistically significant difference in mood and life satisfaction in the fathers’ group. Promoting physical activity among parents of children with CCD can be helpful in maintaining better psycho-physical conditions and can also be a good tool in combating stress in difficult situations, such as the illness and therapy of a child. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)

Review

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24 pages, 797 KiB  
Review
Understanding Melasma-How Can Pharmacology and Cosmetology Procedures and Prevention Help to Achieve Optimal Treatment Results? A Narrative Review
by Zuzanna Piętowska, Danuta Nowicka and Jacek C. Szepietowski
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12084; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912084 - 24 Sep 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 5575
Abstract
Melasma is a chronic skin condition that involves the overproduction of melanin in areas exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Melasma treatment is long-term and complicated with recurrence and resistance to treatment. The pathogenesis of melasma is highly complex with multiple pathologies occurring outside of [...] Read more.
Melasma is a chronic skin condition that involves the overproduction of melanin in areas exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Melasma treatment is long-term and complicated with recurrence and resistance to treatment. The pathogenesis of melasma is highly complex with multiple pathologies occurring outside of the skin pigment cells. It includes photoaging, excessive melanogenesis, an increased number of mast cells, increased vascularization, and basement membrane damage. In addition, skin lesions related to melasma and their surrounding skin have nearly 300 genes differentially expressed from healthy skin. Traditionally, melasma was treated with topical agents, including hydroquinone, tretinoin, glucocorticosteroids and various formulations; however, the current approach includes the topical application of a variety of substances, chemical peels, laser and light treatments, mesotherapy, microneedling and/or the use of systemic therapy. The treatment plan for patients with melasma begins with the elimination of risk factors, strict protection against ultraviolet radiation, and the topical use of lightening agents. Hyperpigmentation treatment alone can be ineffective unless combined with regenerative methods and photoprotection. In this review, we show that in-depth knowledge associated with proper communication and the establishment of a relationship with the patient help to achieve good adherence and compliance in this long-term, time-consuming and difficult procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
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7 pages, 643 KiB  
Review
Prevention of Ageing—The Role of Micro-Needling in Neck and Cleavage Rejuvenation: A Narrative Review
by Justyna Pająk, Jacek C. Szepietowski and Danuta Nowicka
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9055; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159055 - 25 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 7737
Abstract
Although interest in aesthetic medicine is growing, the focus is often placed outside of the facial area, namely on the skin of the neck and cleavage. Exposure to the sun and muscle movements cause the prompt development of wrinkles that may appear there, [...] Read more.
Although interest in aesthetic medicine is growing, the focus is often placed outside of the facial area, namely on the skin of the neck and cleavage. Exposure to the sun and muscle movements cause the prompt development of wrinkles that may appear there, even before they show up on the face. We conducted a literature review devoted to micro-needling to identify its role in anti-ageing treatments and to determine the gaps in current knowledge. A search in Medline identified 52 publications for neck and face micro-needling. Micro-needling is an anti-ageing procedure that involves making micro-punctures in the skin to induce skin remodelling by stimulating the fibroblasts responsible for collagen and elastin production. It can be applied to the skin of the face, neck, and cleavage. Two to four weeks should be allowed between repeated procedures to achieve an optimal effect. The increase in collagen and elastin in the skin can reach 400% after 6 months, with an increase in the thickness of the stratum granulosum occurring for up to 1 year. In conclusion, micro-needling can be considered an effective and safe aesthetic medicine procedure which is conducted at low costs due to its low invasiveness, low number of adverse reactions, and short recovery time. Little evidence identified in the literature suggests that this procedure requires further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Junior to Senior—Physiotherapy Connects Generations)
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