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Special Issue "Noise and Sleep"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
PD Dr. Mark Brink

Federal Office for the Environment, 3003 Bern, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Environmental noise; Noise annoyance; Noise-induced sleep disturbances; Health effects of noise; Noise metrics; Environmental policy
Guest Editor
Asoc. Prof. Dr. Mathias Basner

University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Noise effects on sleep and health; Neurobehavioral effects of sleep deprivation; Population studies on time use and sleep; Astronaut behavioral health
Guest Editor
Dr. Gunn Marit Aasvang

Department of Air Pollution and Noise, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Pb 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Noise; Sleep; Sleep disturbances; Cardiovascular disease; Health Impact Assessment; Environmental Burden of Disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health welcomes submissions for a Special Issue of the journal. This Special Issue will focus on environmental noise and sleep.

The WHO estimated the burden of disease from the transportation noise to be largely determined by noise-induced sleep disturbances with more than 900,000 DALYs lost each year in Western Europe alone due to noise at night, with road traffic noise being responsible for the largest fraction of this burden. From a public health perspective, sleep disturbance in and of itself is a relevant health outcome, but noise-induced sleep disturbances are also suspected to be in the causal pathway to cardiovascular disease as non-habituating autonomic reactions to noise events may be important precursors of long-term cardiovascular outcomes. Albeit the association between night-time noise and long-term health outcomes has been demonstrated in the recent literature, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to disease are still not well understood. However, there is ample evidence that nocturnal noise exposure disturbs and fragments sleep and leads to awakening reactions, elicits arousals or motility reactions, induces changes in sleep structure, and also triggers self-reported annoyance and disturbance reactions. The quantification of such night-time noise effects and the elucidation of the respective exposure–response relationships is an important scientific foundation for night noise protection policies.

We invite prospective authors to present their latest work in these important research domains in this Special Issue. The Special Issue is open to manuscripts in the area of noise-induced sleep disturbances, measured objectively or by self-reporting, in the laboratory or in the field, and from all noise sources. Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, except in the form of congress papers. All manuscripts will be thoroughly peer-reviewed.

PD Dr. Mark Brink
Asoc. Prof. Dr. Mathias Basner
Dr. Gunn Marit Aasvang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sleep disturbances due to environmental noise
  • Exposure–response relationships
  • Transportation noise
  • Road traffic noise
  • Railway noise
  • Aircraft noise
  • Long-term impacts of nighttime noise on health
  • Awakenings
  • Arousals
  • Vibration effects on sleep
  • Noise respite and sleep disturbances
  • Noise indicators explaining noise effects on sleep
  • Standardization of the measurement of noise-induced sleep disturbances
  • Night-time noise protection concepts

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparing the Effects of Road, Railway, and Aircraft Noise on Sleep: Exposure–Response Relationships from Pooled Data of Three Laboratory Studies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 1073; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061073
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 23 March 2019 / Published: 26 March 2019
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Abstract
Objectives: Air, road, and railway traffic, the three major sources of traffic noise, have been reported to differently impact on annoyance. However, these findings may not be transferable to physiological reactions during sleep which are considered to decrease nighttime recovery and might mediate [...] Read more.
Objectives: Air, road, and railway traffic, the three major sources of traffic noise, have been reported to differently impact on annoyance. However, these findings may not be transferable to physiological reactions during sleep which are considered to decrease nighttime recovery and might mediate long-term negative health effects. Studies on awakenings from sleep indicate that railway noise, while having the least impact on annoyance, may have the most disturbing properties on sleep compared to aircraft noise. This study presents a comparison between the three major traffic modes and their probability to cause awakenings. In combining acoustical and polysomnographical data from three laboratory studies sample size and generalizability of the findings were increased. Methods: Data from three laboratory studies were pooled, conducted at two sites in Germany (German Aerospace Center, Cologne, and Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund). In total, the impact of 109,836 noise events on polysomnographically assessed awakenings was analyzed in 237 subjects using a random intercept logistic regression model. Results: The best model fit according to the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) included different acoustical and sleep parameters. After adjusting for these moderators results showed that the probability to wake up from equal maximum A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPL) increased in the order aircraft < road < railway noise, the awakening probability from road and railway noise being not significantly different (p = 0.988). At 70 dB SPL, it was more than 7% less probable to wake up due to aircraft noise than due to railway noise. Conclusions: The three major traffic noise sources differ in their impact on sleep. The order with which their impact increased was inversed compared to the order that was found in annoyance surveys. It is thus important to choose the correct concept for noise legislation, i.e., physiological sleep metrics in addition to noise annoyance for nighttime noise protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise and Sleep)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Aircraft Noise Exposure on Heart Rate during Sleep in the Population Living Near Airports
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 269; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020269
Received: 30 October 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
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Abstract
Background Noise in the vicinity of airports is a public health problem. Many laboratory studies have shown that heart rate is altered during sleep after exposure to road or railway noise. Fewer studies have looked at the effects of exposure to aircraft noise [...] Read more.
Background Noise in the vicinity of airports is a public health problem. Many laboratory studies have shown that heart rate is altered during sleep after exposure to road or railway noise. Fewer studies have looked at the effects of exposure to aircraft noise on heart rate during sleep in populations living near airports. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the sound pressure level (SPL) of aircraft noise and heart rate during sleep in populations living near airports in France. Methods In total, 92 people living near the Paris-Charles de Gaulle and Toulouse-Blagnac airports participated in this study. Heart rate was recorded every 15 s during one night, using an Actiheart monitor, with simultaneous measurements of SPL of aircraft noise inside the participants’ bedrooms. Energy and event-related indicators were then estimated. Mixed linear regression models were applied, taking into account potential confounding factors, to investigate the relationship between energy indicators and heart rate during sleep measured every 15 s. Event-related analyses were also carried out in order to study the effects of an acoustic event associated with aircraft noise on heart rate during sleep. Results The more the SPL from all sources (LAeq,15s) and the SPL exceeded for 90% of the measurement period (LA90,15s) increased, the more heart rate also increased. No significant associations were observed between the maximum 1-s equivalent SPL associated with aircraft overflight (LAmax,1s) and differences between the heart rate recorded during or 15 or 30 s after an aircraft noise event and that recorded before the event. On the other hand, a positive and significant association was found between LAmax,1s and the heart rate amplitude calculated during an aircraft noise event. Results were unchanged when analyses were limited to participants who had lived more than five years in their present dwelling. Conclusion Our study shows that exposure to the maximum SPL linked to aircraft overflight affect the heart rate during sleep of residents near airports. However, further studies on a larger number of participants over several nights are needed to confirm these results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise and Sleep)
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Open AccessArticle
Wind Turbine Noise and Sleep: Pilot Studies on the Influence of Noise Characteristics
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2573; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112573
Received: 12 October 2018 / Revised: 2 November 2018 / Accepted: 15 November 2018 / Published: 17 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (771 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The number of onshore wind turbines in Europe has greatly increased over recent years, a trend which can be expected to continue. However, the effects of wind turbine noise on long-term health outcomes for residents living near wind farms is largely unknown, although [...] Read more.
The number of onshore wind turbines in Europe has greatly increased over recent years, a trend which can be expected to continue. However, the effects of wind turbine noise on long-term health outcomes for residents living near wind farms is largely unknown, although sleep disturbance may be a cause for particular concern. Presented here are two pilot studies with the aim of examining the acoustical properties of wind turbine noise that might be of special relevance regarding effects on sleep. In both pilots, six participants spent five consecutive nights in a sound environment laboratory. During three of the nights, participants were exposed to wind turbine noise with variations in sound pressure level, amplitude modulation strength and frequency, spectral content, turbine rotational frequency and beating behaviour. The impact of noise on sleep was measured using polysomnography and questionnaires. During nights with wind turbine noise there was more frequent awakening, less deep sleep, less continuous N2 sleep and increased subjective disturbance compared to control nights. The findings indicated that amplitude modulation strength, spectral frequency and the presence of strong beats might be of particular importance for adverse sleep effects. The findings will be used in the development of experimental exposures for use in future, larger studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Noise and Sleep)
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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