Special Issue "Multiple Health Risk Factors"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Flora Tzelepis
Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, 2308, Australia
Interests: multiple health risk factors; smoking cessation; chronic disease prevention; priority populations
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multiple health risk factors, such as smoking tobacco, inadequate nutrition, risky alcohol use, physical inactivity, depression, and anxiety, tend to co-occur. Individuals with multiple health risk factors have an increased risk of disease and mortality. Interventions that aim to modify multiple health risk factors collectively rather than target individual factors in isolation may be beneficial.

Understanding how multiple health risk factors co-occur and cluster together is important for informing the development of preventive care services. For instance, tobacco use, risky alcohol use, and depression may co-occur, and therefore a holistic service that can address these health risk factors collectively rather than multiple services that address each factor individually may be helpful. The advantages of improving multiple health risk factors simultaneously or sequentially may include greater health benefits and a reduction in health care costs. Furthermore, successfully improving one health risk factor may increase confidence or motivation to change other health risk factors.

Multiple health risk factors may be more likely to occur in certain populations. Identifying priority populations at increased risk of multiple health risk factors is important for targeting the delivery of multiple health risk interventions.

This Special Issue aims to examine the co-occurrence and clustering of multiple health risk factors in various populations, how multiple health risk factors are measured and analyzed, and the delivery and effectiveness of multiple health risk interventions.

Prof. Dr. Flora Tzelepis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multiple health risk factors
  • clustering
  • co-occurrence
  • multiple health risk interventions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Multiple Health Risk Factors in Vocational Education Students: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 637; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020637 - 13 Jan 2021
Abstract
Health risk factors such as tobacco smoking, inadequate fruit intake, inadequate vegetable intake, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, obesity, anxiety and depression often commence during adolescence and young adulthood. Vocational education institutions enrol many students in these age groups making them an important [...] Read more.
Health risk factors such as tobacco smoking, inadequate fruit intake, inadequate vegetable intake, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, obesity, anxiety and depression often commence during adolescence and young adulthood. Vocational education institutions enrol many students in these age groups making them an important setting for addressing multiple health risk factors. This systematic review examined (i) co-occurrence of health risk factors, (ii) clustering of health risk factors, and (iii) socio-demographic characteristics associated with co-occurrence and/or clusters of health risks among vocational education students. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL and Scopus were searched to identify eligible studies published by 30 June 2020. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Quality Assessment Tool. Five studies assessed co-occurrence and three studies clustering of health risks. Co-occurrence of health risk factors ranged from 29–98% and clustering of alcohol use and tobacco smoking was commonly reported. The findings were mixed about whether gender and age were associated with co-occurrence or clustering of health risks. There is limited evidence examining co-occurrence and clustering of health risk factors in vocational education students. Comprehensive assessment of how all these health risks co-occur or cluster in vocational education students is required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Health Risk Factors)
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