Special Issue "Promotion of Active Commuting to School"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Palma Chillón Garzón
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: physical activity; fitness; physical education; active commuting to school

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Promotion of Active Commuting to School” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for mortality worldwide, and most young people fail to meet the physical activity recommendations. Active forms of commuting to school, such as walking and cycling, provide a daily opportunity for physical activity and can contribute to meeting physical activity guidelines and the associated health benefits. In addition, active commuting to school may have other co-benefits, such as reductions in air pollution and traffic congestion in urban areas. Despite these health and environmental benefits, longitudinal studies show a decline in children’s active commuting in many developed countries. Although school is considered to be a potential key context to promoting active commuting to school, most school-based interventions have shown small or non-significant effects.

We invite investigators to contribute original research and review articles that will stimulate ongoing efforts to understand the diversity of factors that facilitate and/or inhibit the behavior of active commuting to school and create and share the best available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to promote active commuting to school. Qualitative quantitative and mixed designs are welcome. Potential topics include but are not limited to (a) prevalence of modes of commuting to school, (b) benefits of active commuting to school, (c) correlates and determinants associated with active commuting to school, (d) effectiveness and feasibility of interventions to promote active commuting to school, and (e) implementation research in the scope of the promotion of active commuting to school.

Assoc. Prof. Palma Chillón Garzón
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Active commuting
  • Active transportation
  • Health-related
  • Public health
  • Physical activity
  • Fitness
  • Psychosocial
  • Social support
  • Quality of life
  • Environment
  • Emissions
  • Walkability
  • Bikeability
  • Interventions
  • School-setting

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
School Neighbourhood Built Environment Assessment for Adolescents’ Active Transport to School: Modification of an Environmental Audit Tool and Protocol (MAPS Global-SN)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072194 (registering DOI) - 25 Mar 2020
Abstract
School neighbourhood built environments (SN-BE) can influence adolescents’ active transport to school habits. Typically, SN-BE assessment has involved micro-scale (i.e., environmental audits) or macro-scale (Geographic Information Systems (GIS)) assessment tools. However, existing environmental audits are time/resource-intensive and not specific to school neighbourhoods, while [...] Read more.
School neighbourhood built environments (SN-BE) can influence adolescents’ active transport to school habits. Typically, SN-BE assessment has involved micro-scale (i.e., environmental audits) or macro-scale (Geographic Information Systems (GIS)) assessment tools. However, existing environmental audits are time/resource-intensive and not specific to school neighbourhoods, while GIS databases are not generally purposed to include micro-scale data. This study evaluated the inter-rater reliability and feasibility of using a modified audit tool and protocol (Microscale Audit of Pedestrian Streetscapes Global–School Neighbourhood (MAPS Global-SN)) to assess the SN-BE of twelve secondary schools in Dunedin, New Zealand. Correlations between MAPS Global-SN and GIS measures of the SN-BE were also examined. Specifically, MAPS Global-SN audit and GIS spatial analysis (intersection density, residential density, land use mix, walkability) was conducted within a 0.5 km street-network buffer-zone around all twelve schools. Based on investigator and expert consultation, MAPS Global-SN included eight modifications to both auditing processes and items. Inter-rater reliability data was collected from two independent auditors across two schools. The feasibility of a condensed audit protocol (auditing one side of each street segment in the neighbourhood, compared to both sides) was also assessed. Results indicated the modified MAPS Global-SN tool had good to excellent inter-rater reliability and the condensed MAPS Global-SN audit protocol appeared to sufficiently represent the micro-scale SN-BE. Results also highlighted the complementary nature of micro- and macro-scale assessments. Further recommendations for SN-BE assessment are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promotion of Active Commuting to School)
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