Special Issue "Determinants of Risk-Taking Behaviour in Young People: Implications for Innovative Interventions"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Children's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Christiane Stock
Website
Guest Editor
Charité—Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Health and Nursing Science, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany
Interests: adolescent risk-taking behaviour; health promotion; student health; health-promoting university; school-based programmes, alcohol and other drugs; prevention; co-creation; social norms theory; game-based learning; virtual reality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Adolescence is an important period in life where knowledge, skills and practices are shaped that have impact on life prospects and chances. In this developmental phase, the complex interplay of biological, psychological and social changes results in new opportunities, but also in increased vulnerabilities. The focus here is on young people between 10 and 25, because nowadays adolescence tends to start earlier and last longer. In this period, adolescents form their own lifestyle, habits, social relationships and identity. They are also more prone to risk-taking behaviour than during childhood and adulthood and such behaviour often persists for the rest of their life. A multidisciplinary perspective is warranted to understand the complex determinants of adolescent risk-taking behaviour that takes neurobiological, psychological, sociological and economical aspects into account.
Adolescence is also a window of opportunity for intervention. A multidisciplinary perspective is also needed to design innovative programmes that promote positive developments in adolescence. Effective programmes focus on aspects of the environments in which young people grow up, such as legal frameworks, school policies, parental, social and peer influences as well as emotional and social support. Moreover, programmes that support adolescents in managing their emotions and increasing their self-efficacy, self-control and social skills have been shown to have promising effects on several risk-taking behaviours and to promote academic achievement.
This Special Issue will synthesize what is known about the complex determinants of adolescent risk-taking behaviour, with an emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives taking individual and environmental factors into account. It also aims to collect lessons learned from innovative interventions, with a focus on interventions designed in co-creation with adolescents and those that use both quantitative and qualitative or realist evaluation designs.

Prof. Dr. Christiane Stock
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • risk-taking behaviour
  • prevention
  • co-creation
  • intervention
  • alcohol and other drugs

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aggressive Behaviors among 15–16-Year-Old Romanian High School Students: Results from Two Consecutive Surveys Related to Alcohol and Other Drug Use at the European Level
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3670; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103670 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to examine aggressive behaviors among Romanian high school students between 15 and 16 years old, to compare data in two national representative samples and to identify factors associated with physical fighting. This study investigates the association of [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to examine aggressive behaviors among Romanian high school students between 15 and 16 years old, to compare data in two national representative samples and to identify factors associated with physical fighting. This study investigates the association of selected factors (social, school performance and substance use) with physical fighting. A total of 2289 Romanian students were included in the 2007 database and 2770 in the 2011 database. This study revealed that 35.87% of the teenagers have taken part in a physical fight during the previous 12 months, as compared with the European average of 31.5%. Romania has the highest prevalence of violent behavior by participating in a group bruising of an individual in both surveys, 2007 and 2011. A logistic regression analysis performed for the 2011 study revealed the following factors associated with physical fighting: binge drinking during the previous 30 days, male gender, serious problems with friends, parent(s) who do not know where and with whom the adolescents spend their evenings, poor parental caring, low school grades, and high truancy. A decrease in almost all aggressive behaviors was noticed in 2011, compared to 2007. These findings may be useful to support and guide policy makers regarding improvement and implementation of strategies to further prevent aggressive behaviors in teenagers. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Youth Experiences with Social Norms Feedback: Qualitative Findings from The Drug Prevention Trial the GOOD Life
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3200; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093200 - 04 May 2020
Abstract
Background: Normative feedback is an intervention strategy commonly used in drug prevention programmes. This study collected process evaluation data about how programme recipients engage with social norms (SN) feedback in The GOOD Life intervention and how they experience it. Methods: Eight focus [...] Read more.
Background: Normative feedback is an intervention strategy commonly used in drug prevention programmes. This study collected process evaluation data about how programme recipients engage with social norms (SN) feedback in The GOOD Life intervention and how they experience it. Methods: Eight focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 44 adolescents (pupils aged 14–16 years) who have participated in the social-norms-based intervention The GOOD Life. The interviews focused on three topics: (1) interest in and impact of the intervention; (2) perception of the intervention elements; and (3) suggestions for improvement of The GOOD Life. They were transcribed and analysed with content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed that The GOOD Life motivated pupils to re-evaluate their own drug use behaviour and overall met their interest regarding receiving engaging and non-moral forms of drug prevention programmes. While pupils perceived the normative feedback session in the classroom and the posters with SN messages as positive, stimulating and surprising, the web-based application with SN feedback was rarely used and less positively evaluated. Anonymity and confidentiality were regarded as essential to provide honest answers in the poll. The pupils suggested even more variety in ways to engage them and to use more gaming elements. Conclusions: SN feedback was well perceived by adolescents. The intervention met their interest and needs and was able to achieve the intended impact of challenging norm perceptions. Anonymity and confidentiality are key in order to build trust and engage adolescents in the intervention. Full article
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