Special Issue "Towards a Public Health Wellness: Psychosocial & Physical Health in Community"

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Won Ju Hwang
Website
Guest Editor
College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 02447, South Korea
Interests: occupational health; health promotion; job stress; cardiovascular disease; global health
Prof. Dr. Mi Jeong Kim
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Architecture, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea
Interests: Sensing architecture; human–computer interaction; design computing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is interested in how wellness can be achieved in terms of public health environment and community care in the workplace and in information technology. Psychological health is often used interchangeably with mental health care and is mainly considered for stress management.

However, this Special Issue considers smart care for public wellness because our nursing and public health are integrated with information technologies to support public health, and such integration can support public health promotion. Information technology could improve overall quality of life by promoting workers’ wellness and satisfaction. This Special Issue welcomes research contributions on wellness care in public health and community care. The aim is to highlight issues on wellness in public health and community care by emphasizing psychological and physical health promotion perspectives.

Dr. Won Ju Hwang
Prof. Dr. Mi Jeong Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychological health
  • physical health
  • wellness
  • job stress
  • emotional labor
  • public health promotion
  • occupational health
  • action research
  • community life

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Association between Insulin Resistance and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study among Taiwanese People Aged over 50 Years
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7195; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197195 - 01 Oct 2020
Abstract
Background and Aims: Previous studies have implied that insulin resistance (IR) could represent a major underlying abnormality leading to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between IR (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) [...] Read more.
Background and Aims: Previous studies have implied that insulin resistance (IR) could represent a major underlying abnormality leading to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between IR (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) index) and CVD risk among middle-aged and elderly Taiwanese individuals. Methods: In this cross-sectional, community-based study, a total of 320 participants were interviewed to collect demographical parameters and blood samples. The recruited participants were divided into tertiles according to their levels of HOMA-IR. The Framingham risk score (FRS) was calculated according to the 2008 general CVD risk model from the Framingham Heart Study. Results: The HOMA-IR index was significantly correlated with the FRS, with a Pearson’s coefficient of 0.22. In the multiple logistic regression model, a higher HOMA-IR level was significantly associated with a high FRS (FRS ≥ 20%) (highest tertile vs. lowest tertile of HOMA-IR, crude OR = 3.69; 95% CI = 1.79–7.62), even after adjusting for smoking, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (highest tertile vs. lowest tertile of HOMA-IR, adjusted OR = 11.51; 95% CI = 2.55–51.94). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the HOMA-IR index as the predictor of high FRS was 0.627, and the optimal HOMA-IR cutoff value was 1.215 (sensitivity = 83.6%, specificity = 42.9%). Conclusions: We considered that HOMA-IR is an independent factor but that it cannot be used solely for evaluating the CVD risk due to the low AUC value. Further prospective cohort studies are warranted to better assess the relationship between CVD risk and insulin resistance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Elevation Is Independently Associated with Subclinical Renal Impairment in the Middle-Aged and Elderly Population—A Community-Based Study in Northern Taiwan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5878; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165878 - 13 Aug 2020
Abstract
This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the associations between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and renal impairment (RI) among middle-aged and elderly people. We collected and analyzed demographic, anthropometric, metabolic, and renal function data in a community-based population in Northern Taiwan. We excluded subjects [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the associations between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and renal impairment (RI) among middle-aged and elderly people. We collected and analyzed demographic, anthropometric, metabolic, and renal function data in a community-based population in Northern Taiwan. We excluded subjects with acute inflammation from this study and defined RI as the presence of urinary albumin–creatinine ratio 30–300 mg/g or an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. There were 131, 125, and 125 participants in the low (≤0.80 mg/L), middle (0.81–1.76 mg/L), and high (>1.77 mg/L) hs-CRP tertiles, respectively. hs-CRP exhibited significantly positive correlations with body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, triglyceride, and fasting plasma glucose, and a negative correlation with high-density lipoprotein. The prevalence and odds ratio of RI significantly increased across hs-CRP tertiles from low to high, and this trend remained significant after adjusting for the conventional cardiometabolic risk factors. hs-CRP ≥ 1.61 mg/L in the total group and ≥2.03 mg/L in the elderly group accurately predicted RI (p = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). These findings suggest that we should carefully evaluate the renal function for at-risk individuals with hs-CRP elevation. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: A Systematic Review of the Use of Internet based Community in Maintaining Social Capital and Psychosocial Health to Epidemic
Authors: Min Jung Cho; Mi Jeong Kim; Won Ju Hwang
Affiliation: 1. Assistant Professor of Global Public Health, Leiden University, Netherlands 2. Professor, School of Architecture, Hanyang University, Korea 3. Associate Professor , College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, South Korea

Title: Systematic Review of the effect of apps for mental health management for adults.
Authors: Won Ju Hwang; Ji Sun Ha; Mi Jeong Kim
Affiliation: 1. Associate Professor , College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, South Korea 2. Researcher, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, South Korea 3. Professor, School of Architecture, Hanyang University, Korea

Title: Wellness Index related to Heath appraisal for mental health
Authors: Won Ju Hwang; Hyun Hee Cho
Affiliation: 1. Associate Professor , College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, South Korea 2. PhD candidate, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, South Korea

Title: Stress App review for emerging adult and adolescence
Authors: Min Jeong Kim; Hyojin Kim
Affiliation: 1. Sandiego State University, USA 2. Bakseok University, South Korea

Title: Biofeedback of stress management
Authors: Kees Blase
Affiliation: Oud Loosdrechtsedijk 78, 1231 NC Loosdrecht

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