Special Issue "Psychological Flexibility and Adjustment to Chronic Pain"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rosa Esteve-Zarazaga
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatment, Faculty of Psychology, University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain
Interests: psychology; pain management; pain assessment; chronic pain; back pain; pain research; personality inventory; structural equation modeling; LISREL
Dr. Carmen Ramírez-Maestre
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatment, Faculty of Psychology, University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain
Interests: psychology; pain management; pain assessment; chronic pain; pain research; resilience; dispositional optimism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of psychological flexibility unfolds through six core processes: acceptance, present-focused awareness, cognitive defusion, self-as-observer, values, and committed action. The term “psychological flexibility” probably first appeared in a paper on chronic pain in 2006. Since then, numerous studies have demonstrated the enormous heuristic power of this theoretical model, its ability to integrate fragmentary and redundant concepts, as well as its efficacy and efficiency in clinical intervention in patients with chronic pain. However, there is still a long way to go. Of its six constituent processes, the most studied have been acceptance and values-based action. However, little attention to date has been paid to the other processes in the field of chronic pain. Further tests must be conducted on the validity and utility of all the components of the flexibility model and its explanatory power within the treatment context. Moreover, the assessment tools that measure these processes need further refinement in order to avoid content overlap. Finally, research is needed to optimize the delivery of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the context of chronic pain to strengthen the maintenance of therapeutic gains. In this Special Issue, we invite researchers working in the field of chronic pain to submit high-quality empirical papers or systematic reviews related to psychological flexibility and chronic pain.

Dr. Rosa Esteve-Zarazaga
Dr. Carmen Ramírez-Maestre
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • psychological flexibility
  • pain acceptance
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
  • present-focused awareness
  • cognitive defusion
  • self-as-observer
  • values
  • committed action

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Pain Acceptance and Pain-Related Disability Predict Healthcare Utilization and Medication Intake in Patients with Non-Specific Chronic Spinal Pain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5556; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155556 - 31 Jul 2020
Abstract
Longitudinal research is needed to determine predictive factors of healthcare utilization and medication intake in people with non-specific spinal pain. This study aims to prospectively examine the predictive value of sex, age, work status, pain intensity, pain acceptance, disability, depression, pain anxiety, and [...] Read more.
Longitudinal research is needed to determine predictive factors of healthcare utilization and medication intake in people with non-specific spinal pain. This study aims to prospectively examine the predictive value of sex, age, work status, pain intensity, pain acceptance, disability, depression, pain anxiety, and catastrophizing in relation to healthcare utilization and medication intake in people with non-specific spinal pain. Participants were 79 patients with non-specific spinal pain of 6 to 9 months’ duration. They were followed-up at 6 months and 12 months. At enrolment they were administered a battery of questionnaires assessing the predictive variables. Healthcare utilization and medication intake were assessed at follow-ups 1 and 2. At follow-up 1, higher pain acceptance was associated with less healthcare utilization and less medication intake, while male sex was associated with less medication intake. At follow-up 2, higher pain-related disability was associated with higher healthcare use, and pain intensity was associated with higher medication intake. These results suggest that during the early stages of non-specific spinal pain chronification, pain acceptance and the avoidance of pain-related disability—understood as giving up normal activities—can lead to reductions in healthcare utilization and medication intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Flexibility and Adjustment to Chronic Pain)
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