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Special Issue "Promotion of Healthier Lifestyles through Nutrition and Physical Activity"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022 | Viewed by 2526

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tara Coppinger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport, Leisure and Childhood Studies, Munster Technological University, Rossa Avenue, T12 P928 Cork, Ireland
Interests: childhood obesity; body composition;analysis nutritional education; nutrition physical activity
Dr. Kristy Howells
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury CT1 1QU, UK
Interests: physical education; physical activity; physical development; mental health; health education; early movement; early childhood education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are very pleased to announce a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health entitled “Promotion of Healthier Lifestyles Through Nutrition and Physical Activity”. We invite you to submit your original research, including reviews and short communications, on this interdisciplinary topic area.

The WHO (2013) global action plan for the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases identify that unhealthy diets and physical inactivity are key risk factors and that deaths and disease can be reduced worldwide by improving diets and increasing physical activity levels.

There are many factors that influence physical activity and nutrition, and these factors may include the family unit, support systems, educational systems, environment, socio-economic factors, government policies, as well as other factors. This Special Issue seeks to consider how healthier lifestyles, for all age ranges, can and are promoted through nutrition and physical activity. We are particularly interested in studies focusing on diet, hydration and physical activity. The studies could be research investigations, intervention programs; trend analysis; policy analysis or related to promotion, support and/or protection of physical activity and nutrition. We are excited about this Special Issue and we are looking to forward to receiving your high quality submissions.

Dr. Tara Coppinger
Dr. Kristy Howells
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Nutrition
  • Hydration
  • Diet
  • Healthy Lifestyles
  • Quality of Life
  • Wellbeing
  • Exercise

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Running in Natural Spaces: Gender Analysis of Its Relationship with Emotional Intelligence, Psychological Well-Being, and Physical Activity
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6019; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106019 - 15 May 2022
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Abstract
Running is a complete and accessible physical exercise for the population, but little research has been done on the psychological and environmental variables related to its practice. The objective of this research was to determine how emotional intelligence, psychological well-being, and body dissatisfaction [...] Read more.
Running is a complete and accessible physical exercise for the population, but little research has been done on the psychological and environmental variables related to its practice. The objective of this research was to determine how emotional intelligence, psychological well-being, and body dissatisfaction are related to running in natural spaces for men and women. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 331 runners from 20 states of the Mexican Republic (55.3% women), between 18 and 80 years old (m = 37.4; SD = 11.5), with an average of 7 years running experience (SD = 9.3). The Brief Emotional Intelligence Inventory, the Psychological Well-Being Scale, and the Body Shape Questionnaire were used. The results show that men who run in natural spaces have greater psychological well-being and emotional intelligence (stress management) and less body dissatisfaction, and they run more days per week than those who run in built spaces. Predictors of running in natural spaces were greater psychological well-being and emotional intelligence (stress management). On the other hand, women who run in natural spaces show lower emotional intelligence (stress management) and run for more minutes per day. The predictors for running in natural spaces were identified as lower emotional intelligence (stress management), running for more minutes per day, and practicing another physical exercise. In conclusion, in this heterogeneous sample, natural environments are likely to be related to better performance and certain psychological indicators for runners. However, these relationships differ between men and women, so further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm our findings. Full article
Article
The Forgotten Age Phase of Healthy Lifestyle Promotion? A Preliminary Study to Examine the Potential Call for Targeted Physical Activity and Nutrition Education for Older Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5970; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105970 - 14 May 2022
Viewed by 506
Abstract
To date, little research on healthy lifestyle promotion has focused on older adolescents (16–18-year-olds), yet this is a key time that habitual healthy lifestyles could be developed. Ninety-three participants (thirty-nine males; fifty-four females) (mean age = 16.9, (SD 0.4) years), from three low [...] Read more.
To date, little research on healthy lifestyle promotion has focused on older adolescents (16–18-year-olds), yet this is a key time that habitual healthy lifestyles could be developed. Ninety-three participants (thirty-nine males; fifty-four females) (mean age = 16.9, (SD 0.4) years), from three low socio-economic high schools in England, completed an online questionnaire on their self-reported: (i) daily physical activity (PA), (ii) active transportation, (iii) active leisure time, (iv) food intake and (v) experiences of how healthy lifestyles are promoted specifically to them. Overall, 60% reached the daily PA recommended guidelines. Yet, 92% used a bicycle/walked for a least 10 min continuously as active transport and of these, 86% undertook this at least 5 days per week. Almost half undertook MVPA as active leisure, but 66% still spent ≥ 5 h sedentary. Seventeen percent met recommended nutritional guidelines for health and 90% (n = 80) did not report school as a place that promoted healthy lifestyles. It is recommended as a public health measure and as an educational policy matter that schools implement more targeted PA and healthy eating initiatives for older adolescents that also include the adolescent voice. Further, gaining a deeper insight into male older adolescents’ health literacy is needed. Full article
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Article
The Gender-Specific Relationship between Nutritional Status, Physical Activity and Functional Mobility in Irish Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8427; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168427 - 10 Aug 2021
Viewed by 724
Abstract
Research suggests that both nutrition and physical activity can protect mobility in older adults, but it is yet to be determined whether these relationships are affected by gender. Thus, we investigated the gender-specific relationship between nutritional status, physical activity level and functional mobility [...] Read more.
Research suggests that both nutrition and physical activity can protect mobility in older adults, but it is yet to be determined whether these relationships are affected by gender. Thus, we investigated the gender-specific relationship between nutritional status, physical activity level and functional mobility in Irish older adults. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 176 community-dwelling older adults (73.6 ± 6.61 years) living in Cork, Ireland. Nutritional status was measured using the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF) and physical activity was assessed via the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). Functional mobility was measured using the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. The gender-stratified relationship between variables was assessed using Pearson’s correlations and multiple linear regression. Partial correlations (p < 0.05) were observed for TUG with PASE score in both genders, and with MNA-SF score in females, only. Multiple regression showed that physical activity was a predictor of TUG in both genders (β = 0.257 for males, β = 0.209 for females, p < 0.05), while nutritional status was a predictor of TUG in females, only (β = −0.168, p = 0.030). Our results suggest that physical activity is associated with functional mobility in both genders, while the relationship between nutritional status and mobility may be specific to older females. These findings may be of interest for the design of functional preservation strategies. Full article
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