Special Issue "Mental Health Issues from Child to Adult"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Minha Hong
E-Mail Website
Leading Guest Editor
Department of psychiatry, Myongji Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Interests: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; autism spectrum disorder; abuse
Prof. Geon Ho Bahn
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea
Interests: attention deficit disorder; development; child psychiatry
Prof. Dr. In-Hwan Oh
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Korea
Interests: burden of disease; DALY; economic burden; Korea
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Developmental concepts are emphasized for major mental health issues in childhood, including ADHD and ASD, and it is accepted as a given fact that adverse childhood experiences can alter the developmental trajectory of individuals. Mental health issues have negative impacts on individual, families, and society, and also result in stigma. Much research is underway to uncover the interplay of biological substrates, psychological temperament, and environmental experiences.

This Special Issue aims to share and highlight the research findings on various issues experienced from childhood to adulthood. It is not limited to ADHD and ASD, but also includes media exposure, trauma, self-harm, etc.

Prof. Minha Hong
Prof. Geon Ho Bahn
Prof. In-Hwan Oh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • abuse
  • self-harm
  • suicide

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Callous–Unemotional Traits among Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or Typical Development: Differences between Adolescents’ and Parents’ Views
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3972; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083972 - 09 Apr 2021
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Abstract
This study examined parent–adolescent agreement on the callous, uncaring, and unemotional dimensions of callous–unemotional (CU) traits and the differences in adolescent-reported and parent-reported CU traits among 126 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 207 adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and 203 typically developing [...] Read more.
This study examined parent–adolescent agreement on the callous, uncaring, and unemotional dimensions of callous–unemotional (CU) traits and the differences in adolescent-reported and parent-reported CU traits among 126 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 207 adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and 203 typically developing (TD) adolescents. Adolescent-reported and parent-reported CU traits on the three dimensions of the Inventory of Callous and Unemotional Traits were obtained. The strength of CU traits and the differences between adolescent-reported and parent-reported traits were compared among the three groups using analysis of covariance. Parent–adolescent agreement was examined using intraclass correlation. The results reveal that both adolescent-reported and parent-reported callousness and uncaring traits in the ASD and ADHD groups were significantly stronger than those in the TD group. Parent–adolescent agreement on the uncaring trait was fair across the three groups, whereas that on callousness was poor across all three groups. Parent–adolescent agreement on unemotionality was fair in the TD group but poor in the ADHD and ASD groups. ASD and ADHD groups had significantly greater differences in scores reported by parents and adolescents on the callousness trait than the TD group. The parent–adolescent score differences in the uncaring trait were also larger in the ASD group than in the TD group. Thus, these results support the application of a multi-informant approach in CU trait assessment, especially for adolescents with ASD or ADHD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Issues from Child to Adult)
Open AccessArticle
Psychiatric Comorbidity in Mexican Adolescents with a Diagnosis of Eating Disorders Its Relationship with the Body Mass Index
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3900; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083900 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 351
Abstract
The prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders among patients with eating disorders (ED) is higher than the general population. Individuals diagnosed with eating disorders have changes in their body mass index which could promote severe metabolic disruptions. This study aimed (1) to report the [...] Read more.
The prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders among patients with eating disorders (ED) is higher than the general population. Individuals diagnosed with eating disorders have changes in their body mass index which could promote severe metabolic disruptions. This study aimed (1) to report the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders among a Mexican adolescent sample diagnosed with eating disorders, (2) to compare our results with the prevalence of psychiatric disorders reported from a national survey of mental health of adolescents, (3) to compare the presence of psychiatric comorbidities between ED diagnoses, and (4) to explore the relationship of these comorbidities with the body mass index. In the study, we included 187 Mexican adolescents diagnosed with eating disorders. The psychiatric comorbidities were evaluated using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children/adolescents, and a revised questionnaire on eating and weight patterns. We found that 89% of the Mexican adolescents diagnosed with ED had another psychiatric comorbidity. Major depressive disorder (52.40%) and suicide risk (40%) were the most prevalent comorbidities. Attention and deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) prevalence was different between ED diagnosis, and adolescents with binge-eating disorder and ADHD had the higher body mass index. Our results showed that in this sample of Mexican adolescents, the presence of comorbidities could impact body mass index. This emphasizes the importance that clinicians take into consideration the presence of psychiatric comorbidities to achieve an integrative treatment for adolescents diagnosed with ED. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Issues from Child to Adult)
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Open AccessArticle
The Relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Sleep Problems among Adolescent Students: Mediation by Depression or Anxiety
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010236 - 30 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 951
Abstract
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are known to be closely related to depression, anxiety and sleep problems. However, it remains unclear whether adolescents with ACEs have sleep problems regardless of depression or anxiety or under a mediating effect from depression or anxiety. Therefore, our [...] Read more.
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are known to be closely related to depression, anxiety and sleep problems. However, it remains unclear whether adolescents with ACEs have sleep problems regardless of depression or anxiety or under a mediating effect from depression or anxiety. Therefore, our aim was to examine whether depression or anxiety mediates the relationship between ACEs and sleep problems in adolescents by using a community sample. The Early Trauma Inventory Self Report–Short Form (ETISR-SF) and List of Threatening Experiences Questionnaire (LTE-Q) were used to assess traumatic ACEs. Ultimately, data from 737 students (M = 448, F = 289, 15.1 ± 1.4 years old) were included in the statistical analysis. A total of 576 (78.1%) participants reported that they had experienced one or more ACEs. Adolescents with ACEs had higher levels of depression, anxiety and sleep problems than did adolescents without ACEs, and boys tended to experience more trauma than girls. Depression and anxiety partially mediated the relationship between ACEs and sleep problems. The results of this study suggest the need for depression and anxiety interventions for adolescents with ACEs to reduce the long-term consequences, including sleep problems and physical health problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Issues from Child to Adult)
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Open AccessBrief Report
Association of Allelic Variants of the Reelin Gene with Autistic Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Candidate Gene Association Studies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8010; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218010 - 30 Oct 2020
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Abstract
Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disability with a genetic basis, and several studies have suggested a potential role of the reelin gene (RELN) in ASD susceptibility. Accordingly, genetic association studies have explored this potential association, but the results have been [...] Read more.
Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disability with a genetic basis, and several studies have suggested a potential role of the reelin gene (RELN) in ASD susceptibility. Accordingly, genetic association studies have explored this potential association, but the results have been controversial thus far. For this reason, we assessed the association of four genetic variants of RELN (the 5′UTR CGG triplet repeat and polymorphisms rs736707, rs362691, and rs2229864) with ASD by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis. We retrieved studies comparing the distribution of the above-mentioned genetic variants between ASD patients and healthy controls. A meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model, and calculations of the odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were performed. A sensitivity analysis and tests to determine the heterogeneity of the results were also performed. Eleven previous studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and analyzed the association of the above-mentioned genetic variants and ASD. We did not find any significant association between the allele or genotype frequencies of the analyzed polymorphisms and ASD, and large heterogeneity was found for the rs736707 polymorphism. Moreover, no significant differences were found between the 5′UTR triplet repeat and this disorder. In light of current evidence, no single genetic variant within this gene is clearly associated with the development of ASD, and ethnic differences may explain part of the observed heterogeneity. Larger studies among different ethnic groups are needed to establish the role of specific genetic variants within RELN in the etiology of this disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health Issues from Child to Adult)
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