Special Issue "Maternal and Early-Life Nutrition and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Li-Tung Huang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Linkow, Taiwan
Interests: neurodevelopment; developmental programming; cognition; epilepsy; hepatic encephalopathy; stress; obesity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

IJERPH is planning a Special Issue focusing on Maternal and Early-life Nutrition and Health. Nutritional challenges, including caloric restriction, macronutrient excess, and micronutrient insufficiencies during early development, i.e. prior to and during gestation, lactation, and early-life, are known to influence lifelong health. Therefore, disturbances of quality and quantity of nutrition during these sensitive time periods of development can increase the risk to develop common adult disorders, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disorder, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cognitive function, as well as neuropsychological disorders. Nutritional programming has become a hot research topic.

This Special Issue aims to bring together the latest research on the role of nutrition, both prior to and during pregnancy, and in early-life, on placenta function, fetal growth, and offspring development. Studies on a broad range of topics, including maternal dietary intake, neonatal and early-life nutrition, placenta pathology, and future child and adult health are warranted. Original preclinical and clinical studies, meta-analyses, and review articles will be considered. This issue seeks to provide a comprehensive composite of the advances in perinatal nutrition that can impact health.

Prof. Li-Tung Huang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Maternal nutrition
  • Early-life nutrition
  • Nutritional programming
  • Maternal obesity
  • Placenta
  • Intrauterine growth retardation
  • Fetus

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Nutritional Behaviour of Pregnant Women in Poland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224357 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
A woman’s diet during pregnancy can significantly affect her health, as well as her child’s future development and well-being. Unfortunately, many pregnant women do not follow the recommended nutritional guidelines. The reason could be that they have insufficient knowledge about nutritional best practice. [...] Read more.
A woman’s diet during pregnancy can significantly affect her health, as well as her child’s future development and well-being. Unfortunately, many pregnant women do not follow the recommended nutritional guidelines. The reason could be that they have insufficient knowledge about nutritional best practice. Accordingly, the purpose of this study is to investigate the nutritional behaviour of pregnant women in Poland. The research was conducted using a questionnaire to survey a sample of N = 815 pregnant women in first pregnancy. Among the findings were that the subjects ate an excessive amount of sweets, and white bread, and consumed insufficient quantities of fish, milk and fermented milk drinks. Subjects chose white bread more often than wholemeal bread, and fruit rather than vegetables. The study showed that the nutritional behaviour of pregnant women was characterised by many bad practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal and Early-Life Nutrition and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Determinants of Continued Breastfeeding at 12 and 24 Months: Results of an Australian Cohort Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3980; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203980 - 18 Oct 2019
Abstract
Breastfeeding to 12 months and beyond offers considerable health benefits to both infants and mothers. Despite these recognized benefits, relatively few women in high income countries breastfeed for 12 months, and rarely breastfeed to 24 months. The aim of this study was to [...] Read more.
Breastfeeding to 12 months and beyond offers considerable health benefits to both infants and mothers. Despite these recognized benefits, relatively few women in high income countries breastfeed for 12 months, and rarely breastfeed to 24 months. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and determinants of continued breastfeeding to 12 and 24 months amongst a cohort of Australian women participating in the Adelaide-based Study of Mothers’ and Infants’ Life Events affecting oral health (SMILE). Duration of breastfeeding was known for 1450 participants and was derived from feeding related data collected at birth, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between explanatory variables and continued breastfeeding to 12 and 24 months. In total, 31.8% of women breastfed to 12 months and 7.5% to 24 months. Women who were multiparous, university educated, had not returned to work by 12 months and whose partners preferred breastfeeding over bottle feeding were more likely to be breastfeeding at 12 months. While women who had introduced complementary foods before 17 weeks and formula at any age were less likely to be breastfeeding at 12 months. Mothers who were born in Asian countries other than India and China, had not returned to work by 12 months and had not introduced formula were more likely to be breastfeeding at 24 months. The majority of the determinants of continued breastfeeding are either modifiable or could be used to identify women who would benefit from additional breastfeeding support and encouragement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal and Early-Life Nutrition and Health)
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