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Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 2nd International Electronic Conference on Environmental Health Sciences"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Norwegian University for Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway
Interests: reproductive health; epidemiology; environmental health; contaminants; arctic areas; infectious diseases; climate change
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

It is my great pleasure to "meet" you in the 2nd International Electronic Conference on Environmental Health Sciences.

The risk assessment of the effects of environmental pollutants was essential in the 2018 conference. We are also open to this subject this year. In addition, we will have a grander global perspective, and have expanded the main themes to be selected by the authors. The section leads have also been carefully selected. Papers will be subject to a thorough review by the most skilled scientists of our time.

The health of the next generation is of great interest to us. This makes it necessary to continuously monitor environmental pollution and related potential health effects. The information gathered from risk assessment studies is also important for policymakers to identify preventive measures to adopt at both population and individual levels. The precautionary principle should be the basis of all environmental health science approaches based on newly acquired knowledge, including risk assessments and the definition of strategies to reduce contaminant exposure to humans. This conference creates a unique opportunity to discuss any subject related to environment and health issues. The Chair and the Scientific Committee heartily welcome you and look forward to your full submissions to the Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental exposures and health
  • Climate change
  • Children’s environmental health
  • Occupational health
  • Environmental health equity
  • Infectious diseases and environment
  • Global health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Condition of Air Pollution in Kraków, Poland, in 2005–2020, with Health Risk Assessment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6063; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176063 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1052
Abstract
Aims: Air quality changes with human health risk assessment were investigated. Methods: The measurement results obtained by the Regional Environmental Protection Inspectorate (REPI) in Kraków and our deposited particulate-matter (PM) analysis, as well as United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) methodology of risk [...] Read more.
Aims: Air quality changes with human health risk assessment were investigated. Methods: The measurement results obtained by the Regional Environmental Protection Inspectorate (REPI) in Kraków and our deposited particulate-matter (PM) analysis, as well as United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) methodology of risk assessment were used in the study. Results: Annual pollutant contents kept decreasing, with the exception of O3. However, the permissible annual levels were exceeded in the cases of PM10, PM2.5, and NO2. Increased contents of SO2, CO, C6H6, PM10, and PM2.5, as well as of As, Pb, Cd, Ni, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM particles during winter months indicated that house heating was the source of pollution. Due to no significant change in the monthly NO2 contents, this measurement was used as an indicator of traffic sources of pollution. In winter months, the allowable 24 h PM2.5 and PM10 contents were constantly exceeded. PM was identified as the most significant air pollutant. Enrichment factors revealed that deposited PM was enriched with heavy metals. The potential ecological risk (ERI) was determined to be very high for Cd, considerable for Zn, and low for As, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Tl. The total non-carcinogenic risk indices (HQ) for both adults (HQ = 15.0) and children (HQ = 26.4) exceeded the acceptable value of 1. The total carcinogenic risk indices (CR) for both adults (CR = 1.51 × 10−4) and children (CR = 1.77 × 10−4) exceeded the acceptable level of 1 × 10−4. Conclusions: In the years 2005–2020, a general decreasing tendency of annual pollutant contents was observed. However, the permissible contaminant contents were still exceeded. PM2.5, BaP, PM10, and NO2 were determined as the most dangerous pollutants in inhalational pathway. Full article
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Article
Occurrence of Halogenated Pollutants in Domestic and Occupational Indoor Dust
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3813; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113813 - 27 May 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 899
Abstract
The occurrence of halogenated organic pollutants in indoor dust can be high due to the presence of textile, electronic devices, furniture, and building materials treated with these chemicals. In this explorative study, we focused on emerging organic pollutants, such as novel brominated flame [...] Read more.
The occurrence of halogenated organic pollutants in indoor dust can be high due to the presence of textile, electronic devices, furniture, and building materials treated with these chemicals. In this explorative study, we focused on emerging organic pollutants, such as novel brominated flame retardants (nBFRs) and some perfluoroalkyl substances, together with legacy polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) in settled dust collected in houses and workplaces such as one office and two electrotechnical and mechanical workshops. The total contribution of the investigated pollutants was lower in house and in office dusts except for few nBFRs (such as bis (2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate at a concentration of 464.5 ng/g in a house and hexachlorocyclopentadienyldibromocyclooctane at 40.4 ng/g in the office), whereas in electrotechnical and mechanical workshops a high incidence of PCBs, BDEs, and nBFRs occurred (for example, BDE 209 at a concentration of 2368.0 ng/g and tetrabromobisphenol A at 32,320.1 ng/g in electrotechnical and mechanical workshops). Estimated daily intakes were also calculated, showing that domestic and occupational environments can lead to a similar contribution in terms of human exposure. The higher exposure contribution was associated to nBFRs, whose EDIs were in the range of 3968.2–555,694.2 pg/kg bw/day. To provide a complete view about the indoor contamination, in this investigation, we also included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated and nitrated derivatives. Definitely, dust collection represents a simple, fast, and cost-effective sampling and dust contamination level can be a useful indicator of environment healthiness. Besides, the presented method can be a smart tool to provide a time and money saving technique to characterize 99 pollutants thanks to a single sample treatment. Full article
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