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Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Children's Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 64007

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute (QCMRI), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
Interests: eating behaviours; micro- and macro- food environments; infant feeding; parental feeding practices; public health nutrition; health promotion; nutrition education; food literacy; obesity

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Guest Editor
School-Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane QLD 4000, Australia
Interests: fussy eating; children’s nutrition; dietary intake; parent feeding practices; early childhood; child growth and development; interventions
University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland 4556, Australia
Interests: nutrition promotion; first thousand days; infant feeding behaviours; complimentary foods; infant and child feeding during emergency and disaster

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Box 560, 751 22, Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: eating behavior; pediatric nutrition; obesity; treatment; feeding dynamics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK
Interests: caregiver–child feeding interactions; fussy eating; food refusal; children’s fruit and vegetable intake; parents’ feeding practices; healthy development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children” under the section of Children’s Health in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

The period of infancy and childhood provides a unique and critical window in which to address the issues of over- and under-nutrition that can contribute to compromised health and wellbeing across the life course.

Eating behaviours are understood to play an important role in both over- and under-nutrition and are consequently under investigation with regard to their interactions with variables within food environments. From a socio-ecological perspective, food environments are considered vast constructs, spanning a breadth of micro- and macro- level factors, including socio-cultural and interpersonal constructs, as well as institutional and political factors.

Current understanding of the array of food environment variables that, individually or collectively, interact with the eating behaviours of infants and children to contribute to over- and under-nutrition appears fragmented and fails to draw a comprehensive picture of environmental exposures. Further understanding of the role of eating behaviours, within the context of food environments, may have implications clinically whilst also having potential relevance within the realms of public health initiatives and policy.

This Special Issue of IJERPH, entitled “Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children”, welcomes the submission of manuscripts either describing original research or reviewing the scientific literature related to this emerging field of research

Dr. Nikki Ann Boswell
Dr. Rebecca Byrne
Dr. Ruth Newby
Dr. Paulina Nowicka
Dr. Emma Haycraft
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • child nutrition
  • infant nutrition
  • complimentary feeding
  • responsive feeding
  • eating behaviours
  • food environments
  • obesity
  • food fussiness
  • public health
  • food insecurity
  • food literacy

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 697 KiB  
Article
Association between Body Mass Index with Sugar-Sweetened and Dairy Beverages Consumption in Children from the Mexico–USA Border
by Luis Mario Gómez-Miranda, Ricardo Ángel Briones-Villalba, Melinna Ortiz-Ortiz, Jorge Alberto Aburto-Corona, Diego A. Bonilla, Pilar Pozos-Parra, Roberto Espinoza-Gutiérrez, Juan José Calleja-Núñez, José Moncada-Jiménez and Marco Antonio Hernández-Lepe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6403; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116403 - 25 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2656
Abstract
The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been associated with the onset of cardiometabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to describe consumption patterns of sugar-sweetened and dairy beverages and to evaluate their correlation with the body mass index in children residing at [...] Read more.
The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been associated with the onset of cardiometabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to describe consumption patterns of sugar-sweetened and dairy beverages and to evaluate their correlation with the body mass index in children residing at the Mexico–USA border. A total of 722 (370 girls, 352 boys) elementary school children aged 9 to 12 years from Tijuana, Mexico, participated in the study. Anthropometric measures were recorded, and a beverage intake questionnaire was completed by the children’s parents. Significant age by sex interactions were found on body mass index Z-scores (p < 0.01). Boys showed higher sugar intake (p < 0.05) and total relative energy consumption from sugar (p < 0.05) than girls. The energy consumption from sugar-sweetened and dairy beverages was similar between sexes (p > 0.05). Sugar intake from beverages was higher than the limit recommended by the World Health Organization in boys (66%) and girls (44%). A high frequency of consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and similar intake of dairy beverages were found in children from the Mexico–USA border. The high consumption of sugar exceeds international recommendations and should be carefully monitored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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12 pages, 317 KiB  
Article
Facebook Feeds and Child Feeding: A Qualitative Study of Thai Mothers in Online Child Feeding Support Groups
by Abhirat Supthanasup, Cathy Banwell and Matthew Kelly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5882; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105882 - 12 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1523
Abstract
Mothers have traditionally sought child feeding information from social connections. While mothers are heavily engaged on social media and value peer support in online communities, very little is known about how they use online communities for information about child feeding practices after exclusive [...] Read more.
Mothers have traditionally sought child feeding information from social connections. While mothers are heavily engaged on social media and value peer support in online communities, very little is known about how they use online communities for information about child feeding practices after exclusive breastfeeding cessation. This study explores mothers’ perceptions of joining Facebook child feeding support groups. Individual semi-structured interviews with ten Thai mothers were conducted. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological hermeneutical approach. Our findings highlighted that Thai mothers participated in Facebook child feeding support groups in a deliberate effort to reduce their uncertainty by normalizing the process through accessing the shared experiences of others. One of their intentions was to seek menu recipes based on favorable psychosocial and environmental factors. Implications for using social media in health promotion and communication include the importance of building appropriate common practices through social collaboration and interactivity to supplement traditional knowledge and attitudes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
14 pages, 349 KiB  
Article
Healthy Food Environments in Early Learning Services: An Analysis of Manager Survey Responses, Menus and Policies in Regional New Zealand Early Childhood Education and Care Centres
by Pippa McKelvie-Sebileau, Erica D’Souza, David Tipene-Leach, Boyd Swinburn and Sarah Gerritsen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4709; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084709 - 13 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2477
Abstract
Healthy food environments in early childhood play an important role in establishing health-promoting nutritional behaviours for later life. We surveyed Early Learning Services (ELS) in the Hawke’s Bay region of New Zealand and describe common barriers and facilitators to providing a healthy food [...] Read more.
Healthy food environments in early childhood play an important role in establishing health-promoting nutritional behaviours for later life. We surveyed Early Learning Services (ELS) in the Hawke’s Bay region of New Zealand and describe common barriers and facilitators to providing a healthy food environment, through descriptive survey analysis and thematic analysis of open-ended questions. We used a policy analysis tool to assess the strength and comprehensiveness of the individual centre’s nutrition policies and we report on the healthiness of menus provided daily in the centres. Sixty-two centres participated and 96.7% had policies on nutrition compared to 86.7% with policies on drinks. Of the 14 full policies provided for analysis, identified strengths were providing timelines for review and encouraging role modelling by teachers. The main weaknesses were communication with parents and staff, lack of nutrition training for staff and absence of policies for special occasion and fundraising food. With regard to practices in the ELS, food for celebrations was more likely to be healthy when provided by the centre rather than brought from home. Food used in fundraising was more likely to be unhealthy than healthy, though <20% of centres reported using food in fundraising. Only 40% of menus analysed met the national guidelines by not including any ‘red’ (unhealthy) items. Centre Managers considered the biggest barriers to improving food environments to be a lack of parental support and concerns about food-related choking. These results highlight the need for future focus in three areas: policies for water and milk-only, celebration and fundraising food; increased nutrition-focused professional learning and development for teachers; and communication between the centre and parents, as a crucial pathway to improved nutrition for children attending NZ early childhood education and care centres. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
15 pages, 632 KiB  
Article
Engaging New Parents in the Development of a Peer Nutrition Education Model Using Participatory Action Research
by Richard Ball, Kerith Duncanson, Lee Ashton, Andrew Bailey, Tracy L. Burrows, Gail Whiteford, Maria Henström, Rachel Gerathy, Alison Walton, Jennifer Wehlow and Clare E. Collins
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010102 - 23 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3758
Abstract
This study investigated the implementation model and research methods of a peer education program for new parents focused on infant feeding and nutrition. Two hundred and sixty-nine parents with an infant aged birth to two years old were invited to become co-researchers in [...] Read more.
This study investigated the implementation model and research methods of a peer education program for new parents focused on infant feeding and nutrition. Two hundred and sixty-nine parents with an infant aged birth to two years old were invited to become co-researchers in a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study over three years. Data included focus group and online participant meeting transcripts, social media data, correspondence between the implementation team and peer educators, and field notes. All data were consolidated regularly and discussed by project participants and the research team. After each PAR cycle, structured content analysis was conducted, informing the next iteration of the implementation model and research methods. Participating parents were highly engaged in child feeding peer-to-peer education, but felt more effective and comfortable being considered as a child-feeding information resource sharer or ‘champion’ rather than a formal peer educator. Similarly, quantitative data collection was only effective when it was integrated seamlessly into the implementation model. PAR methodology suited the diversity and dynamic real-life study setting, facilitating substantial improvements to the peer nutrition intervention model and data collection methods. Our study demonstrated that a genuine collaboration between health professionals and participants to implement research in practice can achieve both intervention outcomes and research aims. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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10 pages, 766 KiB  
Article
Menu Audit of Vegetable-Containing Food Offering in Primary School Canteens in Sydney, Australia: A Preliminary Study
by Janne Beelen, Jessica E. Heffernan, Maeva Cochet-Broch, Shadia Djakovic, David Chung, Rebecca K. Golley and Astrid A. M. Poelman
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(22), 11789; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182211789 - 10 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2524
Abstract
Children’s vegetable intakes are too low, and school canteens could provide an equitable environment to improve their intake. This study aimed to develop and apply a systematic method to quantify the proportion and variety of vegetable-containing items on primary school canteen menus and [...] Read more.
Children’s vegetable intakes are too low, and school canteens could provide an equitable environment to improve their intake. This study aimed to develop and apply a systematic method to quantify the proportion and variety of vegetable-containing items on primary school canteen menus and examine differences between schools of different socio-economic statuses, sizes and types. Online canteen menus from 112 primary schools in Sydney, Australia, were collected, and data were extracted on a total number of items and vegetable-containing items across different menu categories. Further, data on preparation type and variety were extracted. Differences in the proportion of vegetable items between socio-economic status, school size and type were tested. On average, 80.4 ± 34.0 items were listed, with 30% of items containing vegetables. Most sandwiches (60%) and hot foods (54%) contained no vegetables. The variety of raw vegetables (4.9 ± 1.8 types) was greater than for cooked vegetables (1.3 ± 1.2 types; p < 0.01). Limited differences were observed by socio-economic status and school type. Small schools offered fewer vegetable-containing items than large schools. While primary school canteen menus listed a large variety of items, only one-third contained vegetables. Data from this study can be used to track changes and to develop new opportunities to increase the vegetable supply in schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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13 pages, 620 KiB  
Article
Changing the Home Food Environment: Parents’ Perspectives Four Years after Starting Obesity Treatment for Their Preschool Aged Child
by Paulina Nowicka, Johan Keres, Anna Ek, Karin Nordin and Pernilla Sandvik
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11293; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111293 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2479
Abstract
Changing the home food environment is key to childhood obesity treatment. However, new challenges arise as the child grows older. This study investigates parents’ views on the longer-term management of the home food environment, 4 years after starting obesity treatment for their preschool-aged [...] Read more.
Changing the home food environment is key to childhood obesity treatment. However, new challenges arise as the child grows older. This study investigates parents’ views on the longer-term management of the home food environment, 4 years after starting obesity treatment for their preschool-aged child. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 33 parents (85% mothers, 48% with a university degree) of 33 children (mean age 9.3 (SD 0.7), 46% girls) from Sweden. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. Two main themes were developed. Making changes in the home food environment illustrates the types of changes families make over time in relation to child development. It consists of three subthemes: covert changes, overt changes and child-directed changes. The second theme, an ongoing negotiation, captures parents’ experiences of managing the home food environment as a continuous process of balancing and recalibrating in relation to present challenges and concerns about the future. It includes three subthemes: concern and care, two steps forward one back and maintaining everyday balance. Managing the home food environment is a constant process affected by everyday life, parents’ strategies and the child’s development. Our findings can strengthen childhood obesity treatment and help prepare parents for challenges that lie ahead. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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12 pages, 325 KiB  
Article
Digital Marketing of Commercial Complementary Foods in Australia: An Analysis of Brand Messaging
by Trish Dearlove, Andrea Begley, Jane Anne Scott and Gemma Devenish-Coleman
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7934; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157934 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3908
Abstract
The digital marketing of commercial complementary foods (CCF) is an emerging area of concern in Australia. Although research into traditional methods has identified a range of problems, the marketing and messaging strategies employed within digital spaces have gone largely unscrutinized. This study sought [...] Read more.
The digital marketing of commercial complementary foods (CCF) is an emerging area of concern in Australia. Although research into traditional methods has identified a range of problems, the marketing and messaging strategies employed within digital spaces have gone largely unscrutinized. This study sought to examine the methods used by CCF manufacturers to promote Australian baby foods and brands in a digital space. A multiple step approach was used to assess the CCF brands available in major Australian retailers, the social media platforms they used, and to thematically analyze the text and visual messages contained in posts published over a three-month period. Of the 15 brands identified, 12 had a digital presence, and all of these used Facebook. Four themes emerged from an analysis of 216 Facebook posts; (1) general product attributes, (2) socially desirable attributes (which included messaging related to taste (41%), self-feeding (29%) and fun (19%)), (3) concern-based attributes (including organic status (40%), age targets (39%) and additive-/allergen-free status (18%)) and (4) health-focused attributes (which included messaging related to healthy/nutritious ingredients (45%), and child development/growth (15%). Messages contained in Facebook posts were mostly positive brand/product aspects (Themes 1 and 2) or parental concern-based aspects (Theme 3 and 4). These themes match previous analyses of marketing content in traditional media and should be closely monitored due to the personalized nature of consumer social media interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
14 pages, 1158 KiB  
Article
Parental Feeding, Child Eating and Physical Activity: Differences in Children Living with and without Asthma
by Rebecca Clarke, Gemma Heath, Prasad Nagakumar, Helen Pattison and Claire Farrow
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3452; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073452 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2824
Abstract
This study aimed to establish the differences in parental attitudes toward feeding and activity, as well as child eating and activity levels, between families of children living with and without asthma. Parents of children and young people aged between 10 and 16 years [...] Read more.
This study aimed to establish the differences in parental attitudes toward feeding and activity, as well as child eating and activity levels, between families of children living with and without asthma. Parents of children and young people aged between 10 and 16 years living both with asthma (n = 310) and without asthma (n = 311) completed measures for parental feeding, parental attitudes toward child exercise, child eating, child activity level and asthma control. Children living with asthma had a significantly higher BMIz (BMI standardised for weight and age) score, were significantly more likely to emotionally overeat and desired to drink more than their peers without asthma. Parents of children with asthma reported greater use of food to regulate emotions, restriction of food for weight control, monitoring of child activity, pressure to exercise and control over child activity. When asthma symptoms were controlled, parental restriction of food for weight management predicted greater child BMIz scores, and higher child activity predicted lower child BMIz scores. These relationships were not found to be significant for children with inadequately controlled asthma. Differences in parental attitudes toward feeding and exercise, and child eating and exercise behaviors, between families may help to explain the increased obesity risk for children with asthma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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17 pages, 983 KiB  
Article
Complementary Feeding Practices and Parental Pressure to Eat among Spanish Infants and Toddlers: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Michelle Klerks, Sergio Roman, Maria Jose Bernal, Juan Francisco Haro-Vicente and Luis Manuel Sanchez-Siles
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1982; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041982 - 18 Feb 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4060
Abstract
The introduction of complementary foods is a crucial stage in the development and determination of infants’ health status in both the short and longer-term. This study describes complementary feeding practices among infants and toddlers in Spain. Also, relationships among sample characteristics (both parents [...] Read more.
The introduction of complementary foods is a crucial stage in the development and determination of infants’ health status in both the short and longer-term. This study describes complementary feeding practices among infants and toddlers in Spain. Also, relationships among sample characteristics (both parents and their child), feeding practices (timing, type of complementary food), and parental pressure to eat were explored. Cognitive interviewing with 18 parents was used to refine the survey questions. Responses from a national random sample of 630 parents, who were responsible for feeding their infants and toddlers aged 3–18 months, were obtained. Solids, often cereals and/or fruits first, were introduced at a median age of five months. Fish and eggs were introduced around the age of nine and ten months. Almost all children were fed with home-prepared foods at least once per week (93%), and in 36% of the cases, salt was added. Interestingly, higher levels of parental pressure to eat were found in female infants, younger parents, parents with a full-time job, the southern regions of Spain, and in infants who were not fed with home-prepared foods. Our insights underline the importance of clear feeding recommendations that can support health care professionals in promoting effective strategies to improve parental feeding practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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Review

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43 pages, 1058 KiB  
Review
Parental Feeding Practices in Families Experiencing Food Insecurity: A Scoping Review
by Kimberley A. Baxter, Smita Nambiar, Tsz Hei Jeffrey So, Danielle Gallegos and Rebecca Byrne
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(9), 5604; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19095604 - 5 May 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3759
Abstract
Parental feeding practices and styles influence child diet quality and growth. The extent to which these factors have been assessed in the context of disadvantage, particularly household food insecurity (HFI), is unknown. This is important, as interventions designed to increase responsive practices and [...] Read more.
Parental feeding practices and styles influence child diet quality and growth. The extent to which these factors have been assessed in the context of disadvantage, particularly household food insecurity (HFI), is unknown. This is important, as interventions designed to increase responsive practices and styles may not consider the unique needs of families with HFI. To address this gap, a scoping review of studies published from 1990 to July 2021 in three electronic databases was conducted. A priori inclusion criteria were, population: families with children aged 0–5 years experiencing food insecurity and/or disadvantage; concept: parental feeding practices/behaviours/style; and context: high income countries. The search identified 12,950 unique papers, 504 full-text articles were screened and 131 met the inclusion criteria. Almost all the studies (91%) were conducted in the United States with recruitment via existing programs for families on low incomes. Only 27 papers assessed feeding practices or styles in the context of HFI. Of the eleven interventions identified, two assessed the proportion of participants who were food insecure. More research is required in families outside of the United States, with an emphasis on comprehensive and valid measures of HFI and feeding practices. Intervention design should be sensitive to factors associated with poverty, including food insecurity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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17 pages, 747 KiB  
Review
The Lived Experiences of Fathers in Mealtimes: A Thematic Synthesis of Qualitative Literature
by Natalie Campbell, Michèle Verdonck, Libby Swanepoel and Laine Chilman
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(2), 1008; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19021008 - 17 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2558
Abstract
The paternal experience of family mealtimes is an emerging field within qualitative literature. Previous quantitative studies suggest that differences exist between fathers’ and mothers’ mealtime behaviours, particularly in response to fussy eating. However, qualitative research has not yet focused exclusively on fathers’ fussy [...] Read more.
The paternal experience of family mealtimes is an emerging field within qualitative literature. Previous quantitative studies suggest that differences exist between fathers’ and mothers’ mealtime behaviours, particularly in response to fussy eating. However, qualitative research has not yet focused exclusively on fathers’ fussy eating experiences. This metasynthesis aimed to provide insights into the general paternal experience, inclusive of their fussy eating responses. Thematic synthesis methodology was adopted to achieve this process and consisted of a systematic search resulting in the inclusion of 16 studies (18 papers). The direct quotations presented within each study were subjected to three stages of analysis to produce three analytical themes, supported by eight descriptive themes. The analytical themes presented were: (1) environmental influences on fathers’ mealtime experiences; (2) attitudes and emotions of fathers during mealtimes; and (3) observable behaviours of fathers during mealtimes. These themes highlighted the complexity of the mealtime experience from a paternal perspective. Multidirectional relationships were identified between each mealtime component (i.e., the environment, attitudes, emotions and behaviours) as evidenced by the paternal commentary presented. The findings also provided insights into fathers’ fussy eating experiences, recognising that fathers should be considered as individuals in the presence of mealtime intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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15 pages, 1712 KiB  
Review
Picky Eating in Children: A Scoping Review to Examine Its Intrinsic and Extrinsic Features and How They Relate to Identification
by Laine Chilman, Ann Kennedy-Behr, Thuy Frakking, Libby Swanepoel and Michele Verdonck
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9067; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179067 - 27 Aug 2021
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 13713
Abstract
The health benefits and importance of family mealtimes have been extensively documented. Picky eating can impact this complex activity and has numerous extrinsic (or external) and intrinsic (or internal) features. Occupational therapists work with children and their families by looking at both intrinsic [...] Read more.
The health benefits and importance of family mealtimes have been extensively documented. Picky eating can impact this complex activity and has numerous extrinsic (or external) and intrinsic (or internal) features. Occupational therapists work with children and their families by looking at both intrinsic and extrinsic influences and are therefore well-placed to work within this context. This scoping review comprises a comprehensive search of key health industry databases using pre-determined search terms. A robust screening process took place using the authors pre-agreed inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were 80 studies that met the inclusion criteria, which were then mapped using content analysis. The most common assessments used to identify picky eating relied on parental reports and recall. Often additional assessments were included in studies to identify both the intrinsic and extrinsic features and presentation. The most common reported intrinsic features of the child who is a picky eater included increased sensitivity particularly to taste and smell and the child’s personality. Extrinsic features which appear to increase the likelihood of picky eating are authoritarian parenting, rewards for eating, and pressuring the child to eat. Most commonly reported extrinsic features that decrease the likelihood of picky eating are family meals, responsive parents, and involving the child in the preparation of food. In conclusion, there is a lack of published papers addressing the role of occupational therapists in the assessment and identification of picky eating in children. There appears to be a complex interplay between intrinsic and extrinsic features which impact caregiver responses and therefore on the picky eater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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15 pages, 638 KiB  
Review
Complementary Feeding Methods—A Review of the Benefits and Risks
by Nikki Boswell
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 7165; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18137165 - 4 Jul 2021
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 12034
Abstract
Complementary feeding methods have the potential to not only ensure a diet of nutritional adequacy but also promote optimal food-related behaviours and skills. While the complementary feeding practice known as baby-led weaning (BLW) has gained popularity, evidence supporting the potential benefits and/or risks [...] Read more.
Complementary feeding methods have the potential to not only ensure a diet of nutritional adequacy but also promote optimal food-related behaviours and skills. While the complementary feeding practice known as baby-led weaning (BLW) has gained popularity, evidence supporting the potential benefits and/or risks for infant growth, development, and health warrants consideration. A review of 29 studies was conducted with findings indicating that parents who implement BLW typically have higher levels of education, breastfeed for longer, and differ in other personality traits. Fear of choking was an important factor in parents’ decision not to implement BLW; however, this fear was not supported by the literature. Benefits of BLW included lower food fussiness, higher food enjoyment, lower food responsiveness, and higher satiety responsiveness. While this profile of eating behaviours confers a reduced obesity risk, few studies have examined the relationship between BLW and infant growth robustly. BLW does not seem to increase the risk of inadequate zinc or iron intake; however, emphasis needs to be given to ensuring adequate intake of these micronutrients among all infants. A better understanding of the impacts of BLW is needed to inform evidence-based recommendations to support and guide parents in complementary feeding methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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Other

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0 pages, 1086 KiB  
Systematic Review
Identification and Evaluation of Tools Utilised for Measuring Food Provision in Childcare Centres and Primary Schools: A Systematic Review
by Audrey Elford, Cherice Gwee, Maliney Veal, Rati Jani, Ros Sambell, Shabnam Kashef and Penelope Love
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(7), 4096; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074096 - 30 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3526 | Correction
Abstract
Background: Children aged 2–11 years spend significant hours per week in early childhood education and care (ECEC) and primary schools. Whilst considered important environments to influence children’s food intake, there is heterogeneity in the tools utilised to assess food provision in these settings. [...] Read more.
Background: Children aged 2–11 years spend significant hours per week in early childhood education and care (ECEC) and primary schools. Whilst considered important environments to influence children’s food intake, there is heterogeneity in the tools utilised to assess food provision in these settings. This systematic review aimed to identify and evaluate tools used to measure food provision in ECEC and primary schools. Methods: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews (PRISMA) was followed. Publications (2003–2020) that implemented, validated, or developed measurement tools to assess food provision within ECEC or primary schools were included. Two reviewers extracted and evaluated studies, cross checked by a third reviewer and verified by all authors. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Criteria Checklist (QCC) was used to critically appraise each study. Results: Eighty-two studies were included in the review. Seven measurement tools were identified, namely, Menu review; Observation; Weighed food protocol; Questionnaire/survey; Digital photography; Quick menu audit; and Web-based menu assessment. An evidence-based evaluation was conducted for each tool. Conclusions: The weighed food protocol was found to be the most popular and accurate measurement tool to assess individual-level intake. Future research is recommended to develop and validate a tool to assess service-level food provision. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
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