Next Article in Journal
Predictors of Psychological Distress in Women with Endometriosis: The Role of Multimorbidity, Body Image, and Self-Criticism
Next Article in Special Issue
Complementary Feeding Methods—A Review of the Benefits and Risks
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluating the Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Mechanism and Its Risk Factors in England’s Cattle Farms
Previous Article in Special Issue
Complementary Feeding Practices and Parental Pressure to Eat among Spanish Infants and Toddlers: A Cross-Sectional Study
Article

Parental Feeding, Child Eating and Physical Activity: Differences in Children Living with and without Asthma

1
School of Psychology, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK
2
Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis, Birmingham Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Birmingham B4 6NH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Nikki Ann Boswell, Rebecca Byrne, Ruth Newby, Paulina Nowicka and Emma Haycraft
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3452; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073452
Received: 4 March 2021 / Revised: 18 March 2021 / Accepted: 23 March 2021 / Published: 26 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Environments and Eating Behaviours in Infants and Children)
This study aimed to establish the differences in parental attitudes toward feeding and activity, as well as child eating and activity levels, between families of children living with and without asthma. Parents of children and young people aged between 10 and 16 years living both with asthma (n = 310) and without asthma (n = 311) completed measures for parental feeding, parental attitudes toward child exercise, child eating, child activity level and asthma control. Children living with asthma had a significantly higher BMIz (BMI standardised for weight and age) score, were significantly more likely to emotionally overeat and desired to drink more than their peers without asthma. Parents of children with asthma reported greater use of food to regulate emotions, restriction of food for weight control, monitoring of child activity, pressure to exercise and control over child activity. When asthma symptoms were controlled, parental restriction of food for weight management predicted greater child BMIz scores, and higher child activity predicted lower child BMIz scores. These relationships were not found to be significant for children with inadequately controlled asthma. Differences in parental attitudes toward feeding and exercise, and child eating and exercise behaviors, between families may help to explain the increased obesity risk for children with asthma. View Full-Text
Keywords: asthma; parents; adolescence; weight management; feeding; exercise asthma; parents; adolescence; weight management; feeding; exercise
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Clarke, R.; Heath, G.; Nagakumar, P.; Pattison, H.; Farrow, C. Parental Feeding, Child Eating and Physical Activity: Differences in Children Living with and without Asthma. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3452. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073452

AMA Style

Clarke R, Heath G, Nagakumar P, Pattison H, Farrow C. Parental Feeding, Child Eating and Physical Activity: Differences in Children Living with and without Asthma. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(7):3452. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073452

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clarke, Rebecca, Gemma Heath, Prasad Nagakumar, Helen Pattison, and Claire Farrow. 2021. "Parental Feeding, Child Eating and Physical Activity: Differences in Children Living with and without Asthma" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 7: 3452. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073452

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop