Special Issue "Trends in Drinking Water Quality"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ivone Vaz-Moreira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Biotechnology and Fine Chemistry (CBQF), Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, 4200-374 Porto, Portugal
Interests: drinking water; antimicrobial resistance; bacterial diversity; metagenomics; wastewater; taxonomy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Marcela França Dias
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Sanitary Engineering (DESA), Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Interests: drinking and wastewater; antimicrobial resistance; metagenomics; microbial ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of human activities on aquatic ecosystems and the increasing demand for quality drinking water have brought the need to comprehensively investigate this invaluable resource´s characteristics and sources of contamination. It is important to highlight that the access to drinking water is considered a human right and is defined by the United Nations as one of the Sustainable Development Goals. 

Drinking water for human consumption may have different sources—mineral, surface, or groundwater—and the last two are frequently subjected to treatment before distribution. Treatment may impose considerable modifications to the microbiological and physicochemical characteristics of drinking water, as well as the storage of non-treated mineral water. However, some contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine-disrupting compounds, might persist even after treatment.

In this way, this Special Issue is dedicated to exploring drinking water characteristics and their impact on human health and the gut microbiome. Since each country may have specific legislation and guidelines concerning drinking water quality, treatment, and distribution, contributions from different regions/countries are encouraged. New methodologies that might significantly contribute to drinking water characterization may also be considered in this Special Issue.

Dr. Ivone Vaz-Moreira
Dr. Marcela França Dias
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Drinking water
  • Water treatment
  • Bacterial diversity
  • Physicochemical parameters
  • Microbiome
  • Human health
  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Emergent contaminants

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Communication
Preliminary Study of Lead-Contaminated Drinking Water in Public Parks—An Assessment of Equity and Exposure Risks in Two Texas Communities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6443; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126443 - 14 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Safe drinking water is celebrated as a public health achievement and is a top priority for the Environmental Protection Agency. Yet today, lead (Pb) contaminated drinking water has the potential to be a public health crisis in the United States. Despite efforts to [...] Read more.
Safe drinking water is celebrated as a public health achievement and is a top priority for the Environmental Protection Agency. Yet today, lead (Pb) contaminated drinking water has the potential to be a public health crisis in the United States. Despite efforts to provide safe drinking water, update water infrastructure, and ensure strict drinking water regulations, there are incidents of unsafe lead levels and reports of associated adverse health effects. While there has been increased attention paid to the quality of drinking water within individuals’ homes, little research has examined the presence and concentration of lead in water from drinking fountain sources located in public parks. In this study, we sampled drinking water from every accessible public park in the Bryan/College Station (BCS), TX metropolitan area (N = 56). With a lower detection level of 2.0 μg/L, we discovered a mean lead concentration of 1.3 μg/L across all sites and a maximum of 8.0 μg/L. Furthermore, neighborhoods below the median income for BCS were twice as likely to have detectable lead levels in their water and had 1.5 times the mean concentration. This study underscores the need for action and supports previous studies that have identified a disparate burden to lead exposure among low socioeconomic populations within the United States. By examining the water quality in drinking fountains in publicly accessible parks, the results of our study provide public health professionals with important information about where infrastructure should be improved and the potential harms of lead in drinking fountain water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Drinking Water Quality)
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Article
An Integrated Approach to Hygiene, Sanitation, and Storage Practices for Improving Microbial Quality of Drinking Water Treated at Point of Use: A Case Study in Makwane Village, South Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6313; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126313 - 10 Jun 2021
Viewed by 380
Abstract
This study assessed the impact of sanitation practices, hygienic and storage conditions on the quality of drinking water treated at point-of-use in Makwane Village. Subsequent to implementation of low-cost Household Water Treatment Devices which are the biosand filter with zeolite-silver (BSZ-SICG) and silver-impregnated [...] Read more.
This study assessed the impact of sanitation practices, hygienic and storage conditions on the quality of drinking water treated at point-of-use in Makwane Village. Subsequent to implementation of low-cost Household Water Treatment Devices which are the biosand filter with zeolite-silver (BSZ-SICG) and silver-impregnated porous pot (SIPP) filters in Makwane village, a structured questionnaire was designed to collect the following information: age of caretakers, number of children under the age of five, water storage conditions, sanitation amenities, and hygiene practices. Water quality from the sources to household level was assessed using culture-based and molecular techniques. The results revealed a significant association between the presence of Escherichia coli in treated drinking water with the age group of caregivers and the number of children ofless than the age of five [OR (95% CI) = 8.4737 (0.147–3.3497), p = 0.0141923 and OR (95% CI) = 9.1667 (0.1848–3.0159); p = 0.0165830, respectively]. Moreover, significant association was noted between hygiene practices (washing of hands with/without soap) and water quality in storage containers [OR (95% CI) = 16.000 (0.6763–3.9495), p = 0.0000125]. These findings further prove that there is still a dire need for reconsidering hygiene education in rural areas as the health benefits of water treated at point of use (POU) coupled with safe-storage condition interventions might not be guaranteed without proper hygiene. The results further highlighted the importance of washing hands in improving microbial quality of drinking water, which is the key factor for fighting against infectious diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Drinking Water Quality)
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Article
Detection of Free-Living Amoebae and Their Intracellular Bacteria in Borehole Water before and after a Ceramic Pot Filter Point-of-Use Intervention in Rural Communities in South Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3912; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083912 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 507
Abstract
Free-living amoebae (FLA) are ubiquitous in nature, whereas amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB) have evolved virulent mechanisms that allow them to resist FLA digestion mechanisms and survive inside the amoeba during hostile environmental conditions. This study assessed the prevalence of FLA and ARB species in [...] Read more.
Free-living amoebae (FLA) are ubiquitous in nature, whereas amoeba-resistant bacteria (ARB) have evolved virulent mechanisms that allow them to resist FLA digestion mechanisms and survive inside the amoeba during hostile environmental conditions. This study assessed the prevalence of FLA and ARB species in borehole water before and after a ceramic point-of-use intervention in rural households. A total of 529 water samples were collected over a five-month period from 82 households. All water samples were subjected to amoebal enrichment, bacterial isolation on selective media, and molecular identification using 16S PCR/sequencing to determine ARB species and 18S rRNA PCR/sequencing to determine FLA species present in the water samples before and after the ceramic pot intervention. Several FLA species including Acanthamoeba spp. and Mycobacterium spp. were isolated. The ceramic pot filter removed many of these microorganisms from the borehole water. However, design flaws could have been responsible for some FLA and ARB detected in the filtered water. FLA and their associated ARB are ubiquitous in borehole water, and some of these species might be potentially harmful and a health risk to vulnerable individuals. There is a need to do more investigations into the health risk of these organisms after point-of-use treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Drinking Water Quality)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Drinking Water Quality in a City in Perú
Authors: Pompeyo Ferro, Jordan Rossel, Ana Lucia Ferro-Gonzales and Ivone Vaz-Moreira
Affiliations: Universidade Católica Portuguesadisabled, Porto, Portugal; et al.

Title: Drinking Water Effects on the Gut Microbiome
Authors: Antonia Bruno, et al.
Affiliations: Zooplantlab, Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 2, I-20126 Milano, Italy; et al.

Title: Occurrence of Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Brazilian Waters and the Risks They may Represent to the Human Health
Authors: Sérgio Francisco de Aquino, et al.
Affiliations: Universidade Federal de Ouro Pretodisabled, Ouro Preto, Brazil; et al.
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