Special Issue "Digital Health Interventions in Everyday Settings"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 7 February 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Katrien De Cocker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
Interests: physical activity, sedentary behaviour, eHealth, intervention development and evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A Special Issue on Digital Health Interventions in Everyday Settings is being organised in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. This journal is peer-reviewed and publishes scientific papers in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. Detailed information about the journal is available on https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Digitalisation (the integration of digital platforms such as computers, mobile phones or websites) is everywhere and it is changing our everyday lives in many ways. Our health promotion practice and research are also influenced by digital, electronic (eHealth) and mobile (mHealth) technologies (for example devices, apps, gamification, etc.). Many interventions nowadays include e- and mHealth approaches to improve physical and mental health or promote healthy behaviours. Some interventions are simply being deliverd via the Internet or smartphones, which are ubiquitously present in modern societies. Digital health interventions occur in various settings of daily life, for example health care, communities, neighbourhoods, workplaces, schools, and universities. This Special Issue will bring together the latest research on digital approaches used in health promotion research in daily settings.

Both empirical papers and systematic literature reviews will be considered. Manuscripts describing the development, (cost-)effectiveness or process evaluation, implementation, dissemination or translation of digital health interventions are welcomed. Papers on the outcomes of innovative digital health interventions are especially encouraged.

Dr. Katrien De Cocker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eHealth
  • mHealth
  • Health promotion
  • ICT
  • Health behaviour change
  • Technologies
  • Evaluation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Utilising Digital Health Technology to Support Patient-Healthcare Provider Communication in Fragility Fracture Recovery: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 4047; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16204047 - 22 Oct 2019
Abstract
The objective of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of digital health supported targeted patient communication versus usual provision of health information, on the recovery of fragility fractures. The review considered studies including older people, aged 50 and above, with a fragility [...] Read more.
The objective of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of digital health supported targeted patient communication versus usual provision of health information, on the recovery of fragility fractures. The review considered studies including older people, aged 50 and above, with a fragility fracture. The primary outcome was prevention of secondary fractures by diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, and its adherence. This review considered both experimental and quasi-experimental study designs. A comprehensive search strategy was built to identify key terms including Medical subject headings (MeSH) and applied to the multiple electronic databases. An intention to treat analysis was applied to those studies included in the meta-analysis and odds ratio was calculated with random effects. Altogether, 15 studies were considered in the final stage for this systematic review. Out of these, 10 studies were Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and five were quasi experimental studies, published between the years 2003 and 2016 with a total of 5037 participants. Five Randomised control trails were included in the meta-analysis suggesting that digital health supported interventions were overall, twice as effective when compared with the usual standard care (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.30–3.48), despite the population sample not being homogeneous. Findings from the remaining studies were narratively interpreted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Health Interventions in Everyday Settings)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Traditional vs. iPad-Enhanced Aerobic Exercise on Wayfinding Efficacy and Cognition: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3495; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183495 - 19 Sep 2019
Abstract
The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility and efficacy of an iPad-enhanced aerobic exercise intervention designed to enhance wayfinding efficacy and performance and relevant cognitive functioning among middle-aged adults at risk for cognitive impairment. Twenty-seven low active adults (21 [...] Read more.
The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility and efficacy of an iPad-enhanced aerobic exercise intervention designed to enhance wayfinding efficacy and performance and relevant cognitive functioning among middle-aged adults at risk for cognitive impairment. Twenty-seven low active adults (21 females) aged 45 to 62 years (51.22 ± 5.20) participated in a ten-week randomized controlled trial. Participants were randomized to an iPad-enhanced aerobic exercise group (experimental group) or an aerobic exercise-only group (control group) following baseline assessment. Both groups exercised at 50% to 75% of age-predicted heart rate maximum for 30 to 50 min/d, 2 d/wk for 10 weeks. During aerobic exercise, the experimental group engaged in virtual tours delivered via iPad. Baseline and post-intervention assessments of wayfinding self-efficacy, wayfinding task performance, cognitive functioning, electroencephalogram (EEG), and psychosocial questionnaires were administered. The results suggest that ten weeks of iPad-enhanced, moderately intense aerobic exercise had specific effects on wayfinding self-efficacy; however, no statistical differences were found between groups on the behavioral wayfinding task or spatial memory performance at follow-up. Performance scores on an inhibitory attentional-control cognitive assessment revealed significant differences between groups, favoring the experimental group (p < 0.05). Virtual reality-enhanced aerobic exercise may prove to be an effective method for improving cognitive function and increasing confidence to navigate real-world scenarios among individuals at risk of cognitive impairment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Health Interventions in Everyday Settings)
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Open AccessBrief Report
A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Acceptability of Using a Smart Pillbox to Enhance Medication Adherence Among Primary Care Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3964; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203964 - 17 Oct 2019
Abstract
Smart pillboxes that remind patients to take medication may help avoid unintended non-adherence to medication regimens. To better understand the implementation potential of smart pillboxes among patients with chronic diseases, this study aimed to explore patients’ acceptability to use such devices and its [...] Read more.
Smart pillboxes that remind patients to take medication may help avoid unintended non-adherence to medication regimens. To better understand the implementation potential of smart pillboxes among patients with chronic diseases, this study aimed to explore patients’ acceptability to use such devices and its associated factors. Five-hundred primary care patients aged 40 years or older were randomly recruited from a government-funded primary care clinic in Hong Kong. Patients were asked (i) if they needed to take medication daily, (ii) how many daily oral medications they needed to take on average, (iii) if they had ever missed a dose by accident, and (iv) if they were willing to use a smart pillbox for free to remind them to take medication. Out of the 344 participants included in the analysis who needed to take daily oral medication, 49.1% reported having previously missed a dose by accident, and 70.6% were willing to use a smart pillbox for free. A multiple logistic regression model found that male patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.59) and patients with hypertension (aOR: 0.56) were less likely to have previously missed a dose by accident. Patients who needed to take a greater number of daily medications (aOR: 1.16), who had previously missed a dose by accident (aOR: 2.44), with heart disease (aOR: 3.67) and with a high monthly income (aOR: 2.30) were more willing to use a smart pillbox, while older patients (aOR: 0.95) were less willing to do so. Primary care patients who reported missing a dose by accident were 2.4 times as likely to want to use a smart pillbox while those with heart disease were almost 4 times as likely to want to use a smart pillbox. Further studies such as those evaluating the willingness to pay for smart pillboxes and randomised control trials to evaluate the effectiveness of smart pillboxes in enhancing medication adherence should be conducted to provide more evidence about the implementation potential of such devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Health Interventions in Everyday Settings)
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