Special Issue "Child and Adolescent Health Care"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Regina Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia
Interests: child and adolescent health and wellbeing; physical health; social health; emotional wellbeing; family health; concerns of growth and development for children and adolescent; disabilities; support for family caregivers caring for child with special health needs/disabilities; policy issues in early childhood development; risk taking behaviors in adolescents; infection prevention and control in the pediatric population; a multidisciplinary approach; school health; the advanced role development of paediatric nursing and school nursing; common health concerns of childhood diseases
Prof. Dr. Wai Tong Chien
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Prof. Dr. Sally Chan
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Nursing & Midwifery, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
Interests: mental health and psychosocial interventions
Prof. Dr. Michael Brown
Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
Interests: psychosocial concerns; health needs; health inequalities; intellectual disabilities; access to care; service outcomes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As there are wide disparities in child health between and within countries, we encourage original submissions on research topics connected with children, adolescent health and wellbeing, including school health, public and environmental health. Submissions are invited for a Special Edition of International Journal of Environmental and Public Health. There is an increasing focus on the physical, social and emotional health and wellbeing of children and adolescents. The research methods include random controlled trials, meta-analyses and innovative technologies. We look forward to your submission.

Prof. Regina Lee
Prof. Dr. Wai Tong Chien
Prof. Sally Chan
Prof. Michael Brown
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Child and adolescent health
  • School health
  • Parents

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Theory of Mind in ADHD. A Proposal to Improve Working Memory through the Stimulation of the Theory of Mind
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9286; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249286 - 11 Dec 2020
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between Theory of Mind (ToM), Working Memory (WM), and Verbal Comprehension (VC). Performance of these variables was evaluated in 44 elementary students (6–12 years) diagnosed with ADHD. Their performance in all variables was [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between Theory of Mind (ToM), Working Memory (WM), and Verbal Comprehension (VC). Performance of these variables was evaluated in 44 elementary students (6–12 years) diagnosed with ADHD. Their performance in all variables was collected through the Neuropsychological Battery (NEPSY-II) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children IV. The results showed that fifty percent of the participants were below the 25th percentile in ToM and that this low performance was not related to age. In addition, analyses showed statistically significant relationships between WM, VC, and ToM. Analysis of the effect of WM and VC on ToM showed that only WM explained the variance in participant performance in ToM. These results led us to raise the need to include ToM among the skills to be stimulated in programs for the treatment of ADHD, accompanying other skills related to social adaptation that are usually included in such programs. Likewise, considering that ToM implies putting into practice skills such as considering different points of view, attending to relevant aspects of the context, making decisions, inferring mental states, and predicting behaviors, we believe that through the stimulation of ToM, WM would also be stimulated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health Care)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Association between Time Spent on Smart Devices and Change in Refractive Error: A 1-Year Prospective Observational Study among Hong Kong Children and Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8923; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238923 - 30 Nov 2020
Abstract
This study examined the association between smart device usage and the 1-year change in refractive error among a representative sample of Hong Kong children and adolescents aged 8–14 years. A total of 1597 participants (49.9% male, mean age 10.9, SD 2.0) who completed [...] Read more.
This study examined the association between smart device usage and the 1-year change in refractive error among a representative sample of Hong Kong children and adolescents aged 8–14 years. A total of 1597 participants (49.9% male, mean age 10.9, SD 2.0) who completed both baseline (2017–2018) and 1-year follow-up (2018–2019) eye examinations were included in the present study. The non-cycloplegic auto-refractive error was measured and the average spherical equivalent refraction (SER) was analyzed. The participants also self-reported their smart device usage at baseline. Multivariate regression adjusted for age, sex, baseline SER, parents’ short-sightedness, BMI, time spent on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and caregiver-reported socio-economic status showed that, compared with the reference group (<2 h per day on both smartphone and tablet usages), those who spent ≥2 h per day using a smartphone and <2 h per day using a tablet had a significantly negative shift in refractive error (1-year change in SER −0.25 vs. −0.09 D, p = 0.01) for the right eye, while the level of significance was marginal (1-year change −0.28 vs. −0.15 D, p = 0.055) for the left eye. To conclude, our data suggested spending at most 2 h per day on both smartphones and tablets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health Care)
Open AccessArticle
Supporting Students with Neurodevelopment Disorders in School Health Care—School Nurses’ Experiences
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5752; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165752 - 09 Aug 2020
Abstract
Students with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are present in every school, and most likely, there are a few students in every class. School health care is responsible for providing support to all students, especially those with special needs. The aim of the study was [...] Read more.
Students with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are present in every school, and most likely, there are a few students in every class. School health care is responsible for providing support to all students, especially those with special needs. The aim of the study was to describe school nurses’ experiences of supporting students with NDDs. A qualitative method consisting of seven focus group interviews (that included a total of 35 school nurses) in Southern Sweden was conducted. Three themes were identified in the findings: helping students with NDDs to interpret sensations, detecting early signs of distress among students with NDDs, and using an inclusive design for health education. This study highlights the importance of school nurses in identifying the needs of students with NDDs and promotes a person-centered approach to achieve a healthy and safe learning environment for all students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health Care)
Open AccessArticle
Effects of an Unstructured Free Play and Mindfulness Intervention on Wellbeing in Kindergarten Students
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5382; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155382 - 26 Jul 2020
Abstract
Play is known as the core occupation of young children as it lays a foundation for their early development and physical, emotional and social wellbeing. Literature suggests that unstructured free play and mindfulness interventions may independently promote wellbeing among preschoolers. However, there is [...] Read more.
Play is known as the core occupation of young children as it lays a foundation for their early development and physical, emotional and social wellbeing. Literature suggests that unstructured free play and mindfulness interventions may independently promote wellbeing among preschoolers. However, there is no clear evidence of their combination in supporting wellness in early learning environments. We conducted a quasi-experimental study with 42 children aged four to six years, attending two kindergartens in Hong Kong. The intervention included unstructured play with non-directional loose parts (play materials), conducted outdoors for one hour daily followed by a mindfulness intervention for 10 min per day indoors. The intervention lasted for five consecutive days. We examined happiness and aspects of playfulness before and after the intervention, finding a significant increase in all areas. Given greater freedom in play choice, children showed more disruptive behaviors during unstructured play than the control group engaging in recess as usual. We conclude that unstructured play in addition to mindfulness intervention is effective in promoting students’ happiness and playfulness, both of which may help maintain mental health and wellbeing amid stressors such as transition and separation. The increased disruptive behavior requires additional investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health Care)
Open AccessArticle
Associations between the Chronotypes and Eating Habits of Hong Kong School-Aged Children
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2583; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072583 - 09 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Later chronotypes have been found to be associated with unhealthy diets in adolescents and adults, but no study has been conducted in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the chronotypes and dietary patterns of school-aged children. Children [...] Read more.
Later chronotypes have been found to be associated with unhealthy diets in adolescents and adults, but no study has been conducted in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the chronotypes and dietary patterns of school-aged children. Children aged 7–11 and their parents were recruited from five mainstream schools in Hong Kong. The parents were told to complete questionnaires on the children’s circadian preferences, food frequency, and dietary behaviors. All of the questionnaires were distributed and collected by schoolteachers. No gender differences in chronotype were observed (all p > 0.05). The evening-type was associated with significantly greater odds of viewing television (TV) during meals (adjusted odds ratios (OR) = 5.62 in boys and 5.39 in girls). Evening-oriented boys were prone to skipping breakfast (adjusted OR = 14.78), whereas evening-oriented girls were at risk of consuming fast food (adjusted OR = 7.74). There are indications of some gender differences in chronotype-related eating patterns. Sleep duration and screen time significantly mediated the associations between later chronotypes and unhealthy eating habits. Individualized dietary recommendations in accordance with circadian preferences may be effective at promoting healthy and nutritious diets for school-aged children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health Care)
Open AccessArticle
Associations Between Quality of Life, Psychosocial Well-being and Health-Related Behaviors Among Adolescents in Chinese, Japanese, Taiwanese, Thai and the Filipino Populations: A Cross-Sectional Survey
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2402; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072402 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Health-related behaviors during adolescence have lifelong impacts. However, there are unclear areas regarding the associations between health-related quality of life and demographic characteristics, as well as physical and psychosocial indicators. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between quality of [...] Read more.
Health-related behaviors during adolescence have lifelong impacts. However, there are unclear areas regarding the associations between health-related quality of life and demographic characteristics, as well as physical and psychosocial indicators. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between quality of life and body weight, sleep outcome, social support by age, and cohabitants, given that income, self-esteem, lifestyle, emotional, social and behavioral problems were taken into account among adolescents in East and Southeast Asia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Zhengzhou of China, Hong Kong, Kansai region of Japan, Taipei of Taiwan, Bangkok of Thailand and Manila of the Philippines between 2016 and 2017 among 21,359 urban adolescents aged between 9 and 16. The results showed that adolescents who had better self-esteem and control of emotions and behaviors had much higher level of perceived quality of life. Those who were overweight or obese, sleepy in the daytime, and not living with parents had worse quality of life compared with those who were not. In conclusion, psychosocial well-being should have a higher priority in the promotion of quality of life among Asian adolescents. Nevertheless, further studies are required to explore the differences in perceived quality of life between genders and countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health Care)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
The Design, Content and Delivery of Relationship and Sexuality Education Programmes for People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review of the International Evidence
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7568; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207568 - 18 Oct 2020
Abstract
There is growing empirical evidence regarding the relationship and sexuality experiences and needs of children, young people and adults with intellectual disabilities. A total of twelve papers met the inclusion criteria regarding relationship and sexuality education (RSE) programmes specific to the needs of [...] Read more.
There is growing empirical evidence regarding the relationship and sexuality experiences and needs of children, young people and adults with intellectual disabilities. A total of twelve papers met the inclusion criteria regarding relationship and sexuality education (RSE) programmes specific to the needs of this population. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed and quality appraisal undertaken. The four themes identified were principles informing RSE programme development, design and content of RSE programmes, delivery of RSE programmes and evaluation of RSE programmes. The discussion presents areas that need to be addressed to ensure that people with intellectual disabilities, their families, carers and professionals are fully involved in the design and delivery of RSE programmes. Further research is required to identify the impact of the programmes and the sustained outcomes achieved. Recommendations are made regarding the activities required to enable the development of evidence-based and person-centred approaches to relationship and sexuality programmes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child and Adolescent Health Care)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop