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Special Issue "Arsenic Exposure in Environment and Human Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Debapriya Mondal

Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Interests: environmental chemistry; heavy metals; arsenic; pollution; exposure assessment; health risk assessment; biomarkers; public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Arsenic in drinking water is a major cause of health issues, including cancer, in many countries across the world. The most severely affected areas are in Southeast Asia, notably Bangladesh and West Bengal in India. Every year, several tens of thousands premature deaths are attributable to arsenic exposure from drinking water and more recently from food. Rice is already known to be a major route of arsenic exposure especially in areas where arsenic in drinking water is low. Due to the health risks from arsenic exposure from rice consumption, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives recommended a maximum level of 0.2 mg/kg of inorganic arsenic in polished rice and 0.4 mg/kg for brown rice. However, this regulation is not enacted in many countries.

This Special Issue in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is devoted to recent findings on “Arsenic Exposure in Environment and Human Health” to make substantial contribution to knowledge gaps in understanding of pathways of exposure and associated health risks to decide mitigation and management of arsenic in the environment.

Wide range of topics will be included in this issue, related to, but not limited to, arsenic concentrations in food and beverages, in particular rice, wheat and vegetables; exposure routes and biomarkers that may be used as proxies for arsenic exposure; various models for estimating health risk of arsenic and in particular their variation between different sub-groups and vulnerable populations; and management of arsenic health risks through regulation and effective treatment.

Dr. Debapriya Mondal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • arsenic
  • drinking water
  • arsenic in rice
  • arsenic in wheat
  • arsenic speciation
  • human health risk
  • bioavailability and bio-accessibility of arsenic
  • risk assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Health Risk Assessment of Different Heavy Metals Dissolved in Drinking Water
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1737; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101737
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 27 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
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Abstract
Water pollution is a major threat to public health worldwide. The health risks of ingesting trace elements in drinking water were assessed in the provinces of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Eight trace elements were measured in drinking water, using Inductively Coupled Plasma [...] Read more.
Water pollution is a major threat to public health worldwide. The health risks of ingesting trace elements in drinking water were assessed in the provinces of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Eight trace elements were measured in drinking water, using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), and compared with permissible limits established by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency (Pak EPA). In addition, health risk indicators such as the chronic daily intake (CDI) and the health risk index (HRI) were calculated. Our results showed that the concentrations of chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), and manganese (Mn) were 2593, 1306, and 695 ng/g, respectively, in Lahore and Jhang, while the concentrations of arsenic (As) in Lahore, Vehari, Multan, and Jhang were 51, 50.4, 24, and 22 ng/g, respectively, which were higher than the permissible limits suggested by the WHO. The values of CDI were found to be in the order of Cr > Ni > Mn > Cu > As > Pb > Co > Cd. Similarly, the health risk index (HRI) values exceeded the safe limits (>1) in many cities (eg, Cr and Ni in Lahore and As in Vehari, Jhang, Lahore, and Multan). The aforementioned analysis shows that consumption of trace element-contaminated water poses an emerging health danger to the populations of these localities. Furthermore, inter-metal correlation and principal component analysis (PCA) showed that both anthropogenic and geologic activities were primary sources of drinking water contamination in the investigated areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arsenic Exposure in Environment and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Arsenic Distribution Assessment in a Residential Area Polluted with Mining Residues
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 375; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030375
Received: 4 December 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
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Abstract
Mining is a major source for metals and metalloids pollution, which could pose a risk for human health. In San Guillermo, Chihuahua, Mexico mining wastes are found adjacent to a residential area. A soil-surface sampling was performed, collecting 88 samples for arsenic determination [...] Read more.
Mining is a major source for metals and metalloids pollution, which could pose a risk for human health. In San Guillermo, Chihuahua, Mexico mining wastes are found adjacent to a residential area. A soil-surface sampling was performed, collecting 88 samples for arsenic determination by atomic absorption. Arsenic concentration data set was interpolated using the ArcGis models: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), and radial basis function (RBF). For method validation purposes, a set of the data was selected and two tests were performed (P1 and P2). In P1 the models were processed without the validation data; in P2 the validation data were removed one by one, models were processed every time that a data point was removed. An arsenic concentration range of 22.7 to 2190 mg/kg was reported. The 39% of data set was classified as contaminated soil and 61% as industrial land use. In P1 the method of interpolation with the lowest RMSE was RBF (0.80), the highest coefficient of E was RBF (46.25), and the highest Ceff value was with RBF (0.48). In P2 the method with the lowest RMSE was OK (0.76), the highest E value was 50.65 with OK, and the Ceff reported the highest value with OK (0.52). The high arsenic contamination in soil of the site indicates an abundant dispersion of this metalloid. Furthermore, the difference between the models was not very wide. The incorporation of more parameters would be of interest to observe the behavior of interpolation methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arsenic Exposure in Environment and Human Health)
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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