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Special Issue "Feature Papers "Age-Friendly Cities & Communities: State of the Art and Future Perspectives""

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Joost van Hoof
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Research Group Urban Ageing, Centre of Expertise Health innovation, The Hague University of Applied Sciences, The Hague, 2521 EN Den Haag, The Netherlands
2. Faculty of Environmental Engineering and Geodesy, Department of Spatial Economy, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-375 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: age-friendly cities; urban ageing; technology and housing for older people; gerontechnology; design for dementia; participatory design; architecture for health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Hannah R. Marston
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health and Wellbeing Priority Research Area, School of Health and Social Care, The Open University, Buckinghamshire, UK
Interests: digital games; gerontology; design and gamification; oldest old/centenarians; mobile (Health) apps; active & healthy ageing
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are arranging a Feature Paper Special Issue entitled "Age-Friendly Cities & Communities: State of the Art and Future Perspectives" which will be published in the section of Health Care sciences & Services of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) by MDPI. Currently IJERPH has an Impact Factor of 2.468.
The number of older adults is increasing rapidly, and this demographic shift places an increased level of strain and tension on the various international healthcare and welfare systems. The vast majority of older adults wish to age in place, and many make use of long-term care services, including homecare, rehabilitation services, and social support, as well as home modifications and technology.
One way to support older people to live the life they wish to live is through the Age-Friendly Cities and Communities initiative, a world-wide programme launched in 2007 by the World Health Organization to make cities more tuned to the needs and requirements of older citizens.
The primary focus of this Feature Paper Special Issue is to critically assess the state of the art in Age-Friendly Cities and Communities programme. Focusing on how much the programme has impacted on cities, while embracing its foundations, and what are the benefits of consortium member cities? Which gaps can be identified in the model and how should these gaps be addressed? Evaluations of local initiatives are needed in order to move the Age-Friendly Cities and Communities initiative and debate forward.
The purpose of this Feature Paper Special Issue is to publish high-quality research papers including position papers and review articles addressing recent advances in age-friendly cities. There are eight domains of an age-friendly city, specifically Social participation; Communication and information; Civic participation and employment; Housing; Transportation; Community support and health services; Outdoor spaces and buildings; Respect and social inclusion.
We welcome papers that focus on (one of) these eight domains; in additon to: housing as well as urban planning, (geron)technology and digital solutions, specifically. We particularly welcome position and review papers on Age-Friendly Cities & Communities and its sub-domains, as well as detailled evaluation studies. State-of-the-art project descriptions will be considered for publication too. Such papers should be accompanied by high quality artwork.
In 2019, Marston and van Hoof published a paper in IJERPH in which the authors proposed a new smart age-friendly eco-system, with two additional areas: 1. ‘The age-friendly physical space’ and 2. ‘Technology and associated ICTs’. ‘The age-friendly living environment’ relates to the actual living space (i.e., house, apartment etc.) of a person or families. The ‘age-friendly physical space’ sphere relates to the physical environment – the urban development and design of villages, towns and cities associate to age-friendly, not only for contemporary ageing populations but for younger generations too.
Contributions from top scholars from OECD countries and early career researchers are welcomed whose work intersects across these areas of interest. All submissions should be original, and of high quality which have not yet been published or that are not currently under review by other journals or by peer-reviewed conferences. Open access fees are waived for all accepted papers, which need to have an explicit connection to the theme of the special issue, i.e. Age-Friendly Cities & Communities and/or one of its sub-domains. The acceptance of papers and their respective length are at the discretion of the guest editors. All submissions will undergo single-blind review.
We encourage authors to send a short abstract (500 words max.) a tentative title in advance and full contact details of all authors to both Guest Editors.
When your manuscript is ready for submission, we ask that you submit via the online portal https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/Age_Friendly_Cities. All submitted manuscripts will be processed through a fast peer review process.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Yours sincerely,

Prof. Dr. Joost van Hoof
Dr. Hannah R. Marston
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Age-friendly Cities
  • Participation
  • Independence
  • Healthy Ageing
  • Active Ageing
  • Assistive technologies
  • Physical environment/space
  • Urban ageing
  • Intergenerational relationships
  • Long-term care
  • Social connectedness
  • Physical activity

Published Papers (30 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Age-Friendly Cities and Communities: State of the Art and Future Perspectives
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1644; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041644 - 09 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1337
Abstract
The number of older adults is increasing rapidly, and this demographic shift places an increased level of strain and tension on the various international healthcare and welfare systems [...] Full article
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Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review, Other

Article
Innovation Pathways for Age-Friendly Homes in Europe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1139; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031139 - 28 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 965
Abstract
A variety of innovative pilot projects are being implemented to improve the life-course resilience of existing and newly built home environments. We refer to these projects as “socio-technical experiments” that embody different kinds of promising futures and provide direction to current developments in [...] Read more.
A variety of innovative pilot projects are being implemented to improve the life-course resilience of existing and newly built home environments. We refer to these projects as “socio-technical experiments” that embody different kinds of promising futures and provide direction to current developments in the emerging domain of age-friendly homes. To take stock of this diversity within Europe; this paper provides an overview of 53 ongoing socio-technical experiments that are being conducted in the Netherlands, France, Ireland and Poland. We find that, besides the variation between European countries, there is a more important type variation in terms of the character of the experiments themselves and the differences in development direction that they propose. Our findings suggest that most of the innovations tested in these experiments are not primarily material or technical but primarily social or conceptual in character (i.e., new organizational modes or everyday practices that re-arrange social relations or new housing concepts that bridge the divide between ageing in place individually and a nursing home). This variety of innovations tested in the experiments can be categorized into seven distinct innovation pathways: (1) Showcasing Technology, (2) Innovation Ecosystem, (3) Sheltered Elite, (4) Specific Community, (5) Conscious Retrofitting, (6) Home Sharing and (7) Retrovation Challenge. Full article
Article
Physical Environment vs. Social Environment: What Factors of Age-Friendliness Predict Subjective Well-Being in Men and Women?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 798; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020798 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1600
Abstract
“Age-Friendly Cities and Communities” is an initiative launched by the WHO in 2007 that has spread to more than 1000 cities and communities around the world. This initiative is based on an integrated physical and social environment for older people, and a model [...] Read more.
“Age-Friendly Cities and Communities” is an initiative launched by the WHO in 2007 that has spread to more than 1000 cities and communities around the world. This initiative is based on an integrated physical and social environment for older people, and a model of participatory, collaborative governance. An enabling social environment setting is just as important as material conditions in determining well-being in later life. The objective of this study is to analyze the interaction between age-friendliness (physical and social) and subjective well-being in women and men aged 55 and over in the Basque Country. The methodology was based on a survey of a representative sample (n = 2469 individuals). In order to know the predictive power of age-friendliness over subjective well-being, linear regression models separated by gender were constructed. The predictive models of age-friendliness are composed by different variables for men and women. In both cases, the physical environment variables do not remain in the final model. Among the predictors of well-being in men, the coexistence stands out as a safety and support network. In women, the neighborhood has proved to be a very important resource. The conclusions of this study contribute to literature and interventions promoting more effective strategies that enhance older people well-being, considering the gender perspective. Full article
Article
Combining the Digital, Social and Physical Layer to Create Age-Friendly Cities and Communities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010325 - 05 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1503
Abstract
This qualitative investigation makes suggestions about creating age-friendly cities for older adults focusing on three domains of the World Health Organization (WHO) age-friendly city framework namely “Communication and Information”, “Outdoor Spaces and Buildings” and “Social Participation”. The authors present two case studies, the [...] Read more.
This qualitative investigation makes suggestions about creating age-friendly cities for older adults focusing on three domains of the World Health Organization (WHO) age-friendly city framework namely “Communication and Information”, “Outdoor Spaces and Buildings” and “Social Participation”. The authors present two case studies, the first one focusing on older adults using activity wearables for health self-management in the neighborhood, and the second one focusing on older adults engaged in social prescribing activities in the community. The authors then reflect on the relationships of the domains and future opportunities for age-friendly cities. These case studies apply a co-design and citizen-based approach focusing within these larger frameworks on emotions, values and motivational goals of older adults. Results suggest how the convergence of the often siloed age-friendly city components based on older adults’ goals and input can lead to better social participation and longer-term health outcomes. The authors propose that the digital, physical and social aspects need to be considered in all domains of age-friendly cities to achieve benefits for older adults. Further work involving older adults in the future shaping of age-friendly neighborhoods and cities, and identifying barriers and opportunities is required. Full article
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Article
Developing Age-Friendly Cities and Communities: Eleven Case Studies from around the World
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010133 - 27 Dec 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1715
Abstract
Developing age-friendly cities and communities has become a key part of policies aimed at improving the quality of life of older people in urban areas. The World Health Organization has been especially important in driving the ‘age-friendly’ agenda, notably through its Global Network [...] Read more.
Developing age-friendly cities and communities has become a key part of policies aimed at improving the quality of life of older people in urban areas. The World Health Organization has been especially important in driving the ‘age-friendly’ agenda, notably through its Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities, connecting 1114 (2020 figure) cities and communities worldwide. Despite the expansion and achievements of the Network over the last decade, little is known about the progress made by cities developing this work around the world. This article addresses this research gap by comparing the experience of eleven cities located in eleven countries. Using a multiple case study approach, the study explores the key goals, achievements, and challenges faced by local age-friendly programs and identifies four priorities the age-friendly movement should consider to further its development: (1) changing the perception of older age; (2) involving key actors in age-friendly efforts; (3) responding to the (diverse) needs of older people; and (4) improving the planning and delivery of age-friendly programs. The article concludes by discussing the research and policy implications of these findings for the age-friendly movement. Full article
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Article
The Homestead: Developing a Conceptual Framework through Co-Creation for Innovating Long-Term Dementia Care Environments
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010057 - 23 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1464
Abstract
Alternative care environments for regular nursing homes are highly warranted to promote health and well-being of residents with dementia that are part of an age-friendly and dementia-friendly city and society. Insight is lacking on how to translate evidence-based knowledge from theory into a [...] Read more.
Alternative care environments for regular nursing homes are highly warranted to promote health and well-being of residents with dementia that are part of an age-friendly and dementia-friendly city and society. Insight is lacking on how to translate evidence-based knowledge from theory into a congruent conceptual model for innovation in current practice. This study reports on the co-creation of an alternative nursing home model in the Netherlands. A participatory research approach was used to co-create a conceptual framework with researchers, practitioners and older people following an iterative process. Results indicate that achieving positive outcomes for people with dementia, (in)formal caregivers, and the community is dependent on how well the physical, social and organizational environment are congruently designed. The theoretical underpinnings of the conceptual model have been translated into “the homestead,” which is conceptualized around three main pillars: activation, freedom and relationships. The Homestead Care Model is an illustrative example of how residential care facilities can support the development of age-friendly communities that take into consideration the needs and requirements of older citizens. However, challenges remain to implement radical changes within residential care. More research is needed into the actual implementation of the Homestead Care Model. Full article
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Article
How is Respect and Social Inclusion Conceptualised by Older Adults in an Aspiring Age-Friendly City? A Photovoice Study in the North-West of England
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9246; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249246 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1229
Abstract
The World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Age-Friendly Cities (AFC) Guide classifies key characteristics of an AFC according to eight domains. Whilst much age-friendly practice and research have focused on domains of the physical environment, those related to the social environment have received less [...] Read more.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Age-Friendly Cities (AFC) Guide classifies key characteristics of an AFC according to eight domains. Whilst much age-friendly practice and research have focused on domains of the physical environment, those related to the social environment have received less attention. Using a Photovoice methodology within a Community-Based Participatory Research approach, our study draws on photographs, interviews and focus groups among 26 older Liverpool residents (60+ years) to explore how the city promotes respect and social inclusion (a core WHO AFC domain). Being involved in this photovoice study allowed older adults across four contrasting neighbourhoods to communicate their perspectives directly to Liverpool’s policymakers, service providers and third sector organisations. This paper provides novel insights into how: (i) respect and social inclusion are shaped by aspects of both physical and social environment, and (ii) the accessibility, affordability and sociability of physical spaces and wider social processes (e.g., neighbourhood fragmentation) contributed to or hindered participants’ health, wellbeing, intergenerational relationships and feelings of inclusion and connection. Our findings suggest that respect and social inclusion are relevant across all eight domains of the WHO AFC Guide. It is core to an AFC and should be reflected in both city-based policies and evaluations. Full article
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Article
Smart and Age-Friendly Cities in Russia: An Exploratory Study of Attitudes, Perceptions, Quality of Life and Health Information Needs
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9212; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249212 - 09 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 863
Abstract
In Russia, initiatives for healthy ageing have been growing over the last two decades; however, none use an evidence-based (EB) approach. It is proposed that Kazan, a city with a population of over a million in the European part of Russia, has good [...] Read more.
In Russia, initiatives for healthy ageing have been growing over the last two decades; however, none use an evidence-based (EB) approach. It is proposed that Kazan, a city with a population of over a million in the European part of Russia, has good chances of moving towards age-friendliness and contributing to raising awareness about healthy ageing through Cochrane evidence. One of the eight essential features of age-friendly cities by the World Health Organisation (WHO) directly points to health services. This exploratory study assesses the health information needs of the ageing population of Kazan and the challenges people face in improving their health and longevity. Survey data were used from 134 participants, patients, caregivers and healthcare providers of the Interregional Clinical Diagnostic Centre (ICDC), aged from 30 to over 80 years, and potential associations of the studied parameters with age, gender, quality of life and other characteristics were analysed. Older people (60+) were less positive about their quality of life, took medicines more often on a daily basis (10/16 compared to 29/117 of people under 60), encountered problems with ageing (9/16 compared to 21/117 of people under 60) and rated their quality of life as unsatisfactory (4/14 compared to 9/107 of people under 60). Awareness of EB approaches and Cochrane was higher within health professions (evidence-based medicine: 42/86 vs. 13/48; Cochrane: 32/86 vs. 2/48), and health information needs did not differ between age or gender groups or people with a satisfactory and unsatisfactory quality of life. The minority (10%—13/134) were aware of ageism without age or gender differences. The low awareness calls for the need of Cochrane intervention both for consumers and those in the health profession to raise awareness to contribute to Kazan moving towards an age-friendly city. Full article
Article
Prisons, Older People, and Age-Friendly Cities and Communities: Towards an Inclusive Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9200; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249200 - 09 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1084
Abstract
This original and ground-breaking interdisciplinary article brings together perspectives from gerontology, criminology, penology, and social policy to explore critically the nature and consequences of the lack of visibility of prisons, prisoners, and ex-prisoners within global research, policy and practice on age-friendly cities and [...] Read more.
This original and ground-breaking interdisciplinary article brings together perspectives from gerontology, criminology, penology, and social policy to explore critically the nature and consequences of the lack of visibility of prisons, prisoners, and ex-prisoners within global research, policy and practice on age-friendly cities and communities (AFCC), at a time when increasing numbers of people are ageing in prison settings in many countries. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose challenges in the contexts both of older peoples’ lives, wellbeing, and health, and also within prison settings, and thus it is timely to reflect on the links between older people, prisons, and cities, at a time of ongoing change. Just as there is an extensive body of ongoing research exploring age-friendly cities and communities, there is extensive published research on older people’s experiences of imprisonment, and a growing body of research on ageing in the prison setting. However, these two research and policy fields have evolved largely independently and separately, leading to a lack of visibility of prisons and prisoners within AFCC research and policy and, similarly, the omission of consideration of the relevance of AFCC research and policy to older prisoners and ex-prisoners. Existing checklists and tools for assessing and measuring the age-friendliness of cities and communities may be of limited relevance in the context of prisons and prisoners. This article identifies the potential for integration and for cross-disciplinary research in this context, concluding with recommendations for developing inclusive research, policies, and evaluation frameworks which recognise and include prisons and older prisoners, both during and after incarceration. Full article
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Article
Prioritizing Age-Friendly Domains for Transforming a Mid-Sized American City
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9103; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239103 - 06 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 863
Abstract
In May 2019, the city of Akron in the state of Ohio was admitted into AARP’s network of age friendly cities and communities. Akron has a long history of aging services initiative that date back to the 1970s. To provide direction for future [...] Read more.
In May 2019, the city of Akron in the state of Ohio was admitted into AARP’s network of age friendly cities and communities. Akron has a long history of aging services initiative that date back to the 1970s. To provide direction for future aging initiatives, an assessment of Akron’s current state was conducted in early 2020. A survey designed to capture information on the eight Age-friendly domains was designed and mailed to 3000 randomized individuals in Akron’s ten political wards. A total of 656 individuals responded and returned the survey. Akron is rated good to excellent by older Akronites; people want to stay in their neighborhood and in their home. Most Akronites like and use their neighborhood parks, find their streets well-lit, and feel safe walking in their neighborhood. Most respondents rated transportation in Akron as good to very good, but they found sidewalks good to poor. There is a high level of access to social and educational activities and a substantial opportunity to include more people. About two-thirds of respondents participate in faith-based activities, volunteer, and participate in city-sponsored events. Loneliness is not or rarely a problem for three quarters of respondents. Around 56.5% of respondents indicated they disagree they are disconnected from the community. There is high level of access to the Internet and public WiFi in Akron and a substantial opportunity to include more people. Overall, Akron has benefitted from its historical efforts and has the opportunity to impact on more older adults as the older population grows. Full article
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Article
Engaging Older People in Age-Friendly Cities through Participatory Video Design
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8977; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238977 - 02 Dec 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1060
Abstract
Participatory video design is a novel approach to collect experiences and perceptions of older people about the age-friendliness of their city or neighborhood. In this article, we describe how this co-creative method can add to specific knowledge about the preferences and needs of [...] Read more.
Participatory video design is a novel approach to collect experiences and perceptions of older people about the age-friendliness of their city or neighborhood. In this article, we describe how this co-creative method can add to specific knowledge about the preferences and needs of older people about the improvement or preservation of their environment. We describe two examples of this approach in the cities of The Hague and Leiden, the Netherlands. Persons of 60 years and older were invited to participate in a “workshop” on filmmaking focusing on age-friendly cities. A professional filmmaker and a researcher of the University of Applied Sciences worked in co-creation with older people, to produce short films on the topics that were perceived as important from the perspective of the participants. The older people worked in couples to produce their short films about the city or their neighborhood. Topics of the films included communication and information, outdoor spaces, social relations, and community support. The use of participatory video design can foster empowerment and social interaction among older participants, and insight into the preferences and needs of older people regarding age-friendly cities. Full article
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Article
Thermal Personalities of Older People in South Australia: A Personas-Based Approach to Develop Thermal Comfort Guidelines
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8402; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228402 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1022
Abstract
An important consideration for future age-friendly cities is that older people are able to live in housing appropriate for their needs. While thermal comfort in the home is vital for the health and well-being of older people, there are currently few guidelines about [...] Read more.
An important consideration for future age-friendly cities is that older people are able to live in housing appropriate for their needs. While thermal comfort in the home is vital for the health and well-being of older people, there are currently few guidelines about how to achieve this. This study is part of a research project that aims to improve the thermal environment of housing for older Australians by investigating the thermal comfort of older people living independently in South Australia and developing thermal comfort guidelines for people ageing-in-place. This paper describes the approach fundamental for developing the guidelines, using data from the study participants’ and the concept of personas to develop a number of discrete “thermal personalities”. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) was implemented to analyse the features of research participants, resulting in six distinct clusters. Quantitative and qualitative data from earlier stages of the project were then used to develop the thermal personalities of each cluster. The thermal personalities represent different approaches to achieving thermal comfort, taking into account a wide range of factors including personal characteristics, ideas, beliefs and knowledge, house type, and location. Basing the guidelines on thermal personalities highlights the heterogeneity of older people and the context-dependent nature of thermal comfort in the home and will make the guidelines more user-friendly and useful. Full article
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Article
Digitalising the Age-Friendly City: Insights from Participatory Action Research
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8281; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218281 - 09 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1441
Abstract
The World Health Organization’s age-friendly city initiative emerged as a response to the intersecting global trends of population ageing and urbanisation. However, a third global trend—digitalisation—has largely been overlooked in research and policy making relating to age-friendly cities and communities. Within the context [...] Read more.
The World Health Organization’s age-friendly city initiative emerged as a response to the intersecting global trends of population ageing and urbanisation. However, a third global trend—digitalisation—has largely been overlooked in research and policy making relating to age-friendly cities and communities. Within the context of a general shift towards online civic participatory activities, this article explores older adults’ digital citizenship in an age-friendly city in the North of England. Drawing on interviews, observations and field notes from design workshops as part of an ongoing participatory action research project, we consider two key questions. First, how does an age-friendly city stakeholder organisation of older adults make use of digital technologies in order to provide digital information and communications? Second, what is the potential of digital audio to increase civic participation in later life and local engagement with age-friendly issues? Our analysis focuses on two domains of the World Health Organization’s age-friendly city framework: Communication and information and civic participation. First, we report on the stakeholder organisation’s efforts to re-design their digital newsletter in order to provide information and communications to older residents about local work on ageing projects. We then outline the organisation’s efforts, in a public setting, to engage with digital audio as a way to increase the participation of older residents with age-friendly topics. We conclude by suggesting the need to re-frame the role of digital technologies within the age-friendly city, broadening the scope from accessibility towards enhancing digital citizenship opportunities. Full article
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Article
How does a (Smart) Age-Friendly Ecosystem Look in a Post-Pandemic Society?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8276; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218276 - 09 Nov 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2550
Abstract
COVID-19 has impacted not only the health of citizens, but also the various factors that make up our society, living environments, and ecosystems. This pandemic has shown that future living will need to be agile and flexible to adapt to the various changes [...] Read more.
COVID-19 has impacted not only the health of citizens, but also the various factors that make up our society, living environments, and ecosystems. This pandemic has shown that future living will need to be agile and flexible to adapt to the various changes in needs of societal populations. Digital technology has played an integral role during COVID-19, assisting various sectors of the community, and demonstrating that smart cities can provide opportunities to respond to many future societal challenges. In the decades ahead, the rise in aging populations will be one of these challenges, and one in which the needs and requirements between demographic cohorts will vary greatly. Although we need to create future smart age-friendly ecosystems to meet these needs, technology still does not feature in the WHO eight domains of an age-friendly city. This paper extends upon Marston and van Hoof’s ‘Smart Age-friendly Ecosystem’ (SAfE) framework, and explores how digital technology, design hacking, and research approaches can be used to understand a smart age-friendly ecosystem in a post-pandemic society. By exploring a series of case studies and using real-life scenarios from the standpoint of COVID-19, we propose the ‘Concept of Age-friendly Smart Ecologies (CASE)’ framework. We provide an insight into a myriad of contemporary multi-disciplinary research, which are capable to initiate discussions and bring various actors together with a positive impact on future planning and development of age-friendly ecosystems. The strengths and limitations of this framework are outlined, with advantages evident in the opportunity for towns, regions/counties, provinces, and states to take an agile approach and work together in adopting and implement improvements for the greater benefits of residents and citizens. Full article
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Article
How Can the Lived Environment Support Healthy Ageing? A Spatial Indicators Framework for the Assessment of Age-Friendly Communities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7685; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207685 - 21 Oct 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2057
Abstract
The Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Guide was released by the World Health Organization over a decade ago with the aim of creating environments that support healthy ageing. The comprehensive framework includes the domains of outdoor spaces and buildings, transportation, housing, social participation, respect [...] Read more.
The Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Guide was released by the World Health Organization over a decade ago with the aim of creating environments that support healthy ageing. The comprehensive framework includes the domains of outdoor spaces and buildings, transportation, housing, social participation, respect and inclusion, civic participation and employment, communication and information, and community and health services. A major critique of the age-friendly community movement has argued for a more clearly defined scope of actions, the need to measure or quantify results and increase the connections to policy and funding levers. This paper provides a quantifiable spatial indicators framework to assess local lived environments according to each Age-Friendly Cities and Communities (AFC) domain. The selection of these AFC spatial indicators can be applied within local neighbourhoods, census tracts, suburbs, municipalities, or cities with minimal resource requirements other than applied spatial analysis, which addresses past critiques of the Age-Friendly Community movement. The framework has great potential for applications within local, national, and international policy and planning contexts in the future. Full article
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Article
The Role of Mobility Digital Ecosystems for Age-Friendly Urban Public Transport: A Narrative Literature Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7465; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207465 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1212
Abstract
Within the context of the intersection of the global megatrends of urbanisation, ageing societies and digitalisation, this paper explores older people’s mobility, with a particular interest in public transport, and a strong consideration of digital/ICT elements. With a focus on (smart) mobility, the [...] Read more.
Within the context of the intersection of the global megatrends of urbanisation, ageing societies and digitalisation, this paper explores older people’s mobility, with a particular interest in public transport, and a strong consideration of digital/ICT elements. With a focus on (smart) mobility, the paper aims to conceptualise transport, one of the main domains of age-friendly cities as a core element of a smart, age-friendly ecosystem. It also aims to propose a justice-informed perspective for the study of age-friendly smart mobility; to contribute towards a framework for the evaluation of age-friendly smart transport as a core element of the global age-friendly cities programme that comprises mobility practices, digital data, digital networks, material/physical geographies and digital devices and access; and to introduce the term “mobility digital ecosystem” to describe this framework. The paper uses the method of a narrative literature review to weave together a selected range of perspectives from communications, transport, and mobility studies in order to introduce the embeddedness of both communication technology use and mobility practices into their material conditions. Combining insights from communications, mobility and transport and social gerontology with a justice perspective on ICT access and mobility, the paper then develops a framework to study age-friendly smart mobility. What we call a “mobility digital ecosystem” framework comprises five elements—mobility practices, digital data, digital networks, material geographies, digital devices and access to services. The paper contributes a justice-informed perspective that points towards a conceptualisation of age-friendly smart mobility as a core element of the age-friendly cities and communities in the WHO’s global age-friendly cities programme. Full article
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Article
Is Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry ‘Getting Old’? How Psychiatry Referrals in the General Hospital Have Changed over 20 Years
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7389; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207389 - 10 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 892
Abstract
There is an ever-growing awareness of the health-related special needs of older patients, and Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Services (CLPS) are significantly involved in providing such age-friendly hospital care. CLPS perform psychiatric assessment for hospitalized patients with suspected medical-psychiatric comorbidity and support ward teams in [...] Read more.
There is an ever-growing awareness of the health-related special needs of older patients, and Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Services (CLPS) are significantly involved in providing such age-friendly hospital care. CLPS perform psychiatric assessment for hospitalized patients with suspected medical-psychiatric comorbidity and support ward teams in a bio-psycho-social oriented care management. Changes in features of the population referred to a CLPS over a 20-year course were analysed and discussed, especially comparing older and younger referred subjects. Epidemiological and clinical data from all first psychiatric consultations carried out at the Modena (North of Italy) University Hospital CLPS in the period 2000–2019 (N = 19,278) were included; two groups of consultations were created according to the age of patients: OV65 (consultations for patients older than 64 years) and NONOV65 (all the rest of consultations). Consultations for OV65 were about 38.9% of the total assessments performed, with an average of approximately 375 per year, vs. the 589 performed for NOV65. The number of referrals for older patients significantly increased over the 20 years. The mean age and the male/female ratio of the sample changed significantly across the years in the whole sample as well as both among OV65 and NOV65. Urgent referrals were more frequent among NOV65 and the rate between urgent/non urgent referrals changed differently in the two subgroups. The analysis outlined recurring patterns that should guide future clinical, training and research activities. Full article
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Article
How Older People Experience the Age-Friendliness of Their City: Development of the Age-Friendly Cities and Communities Questionnaire
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6867; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186867 - 20 Sep 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2039
Abstract
The World Health Organization engages cities and communities all over the world in becoming age-friendly. There is a need for assessing the age-friendliness of cities and communities by means of a transparently constructed and validated tool which measures the construct as a whole. [...] Read more.
The World Health Organization engages cities and communities all over the world in becoming age-friendly. There is a need for assessing the age-friendliness of cities and communities by means of a transparently constructed and validated tool which measures the construct as a whole. The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire measuring age-friendliness, providing full transparency and reproducibility. The development and validation of the Age Friendly Cities and Communities Questionnaire (AFCCQ) followed the criteria of the COnsensus-based Standards for selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN). Four phases were followed: (1) development of the conceptual model, themes and items; (2) initial (qualitative) validation; (3) psychometric validation, and (4) translating the instrument using the forward-backward translation method. This rigorous process of development and validation resulted in a valid, psychometrically sound, comprehensive 23-item questionnaire. This questionnaire can be used to measure older people’s experiences regarding the eight domains of the WHO Age-Friendly Cities model, and an additional financial domain. The AFCCQ allows practitioners and researchers to capture the age-friendliness of a city or community in a numerical fashion, which helps monitor the age-friendliness and the potential impact of policies or social programmes. The AFCCQ was created in Dutch and translated into British-English. Full article
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Article
Towards Responsible Rebellion: How Founders Deal with Challenges in Establishing and Governing Innovative Living Arrangements for Older People
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6235; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176235 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1378
Abstract
In the Netherlands, there is an increasing need for collective forms of housing for older people. Such housing bridges the gap between the extremes of living in an institutionalised setting and remaining in their own house. The demand is related to the closure [...] Read more.
In the Netherlands, there is an increasing need for collective forms of housing for older people. Such housing bridges the gap between the extremes of living in an institutionalised setting and remaining in their own house. The demand is related to the closure of many residential care homes and the need for social engagement with other residents. This study focuses on housing initiatives that offer innovative and alternative forms of independent living, which deviate from mainstream housing arrangements. It draws on recent literature on healthcare ‘rebels’ and further develops the concept of ‘rebellion’ in the context of housing. The main research question is how founders dealt with challenges of establishing and governing ‘rebellious’ innovative living arrangements for older people in the highly regulated context of housing and care in the Netherlands. Qualitative in-depth interviews with 17 founders (social entrepreneurs, directors and supervisory board members) were conducted. Founders encountered various obstacles that are often related to governmental and sectoral rules and regulations. Their stories demonstrate the opportunities and constraints of innovative entrepreneurship at the intersection of housing and care. The study concludes with the notion of ‘responsible rebellion’ and practical lessons about dealing with rules and regulations and creating supportive contexts. Full article
Article
Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5711; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165711 - 07 Aug 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2638
Abstract
As the use of technology becomes further integrated into the daily lives of all persons, including older adults, it is important to investigate how the perceptions and use of technology intersect with intergenerational relationships. Based on the international multi-centered study Technology In Later [...] Read more.
As the use of technology becomes further integrated into the daily lives of all persons, including older adults, it is important to investigate how the perceptions and use of technology intersect with intergenerational relationships. Based on the international multi-centered study Technology In Later Life (TILL), this paper emphasizes the perceptions of older adults and the interconnection between technology and intergenerational relationships are integral to social connectedness with others. Participants from rural and urban sites in Canada and the UK (n = 37) completed an online survey and attended a focus group. Descriptive and thematic analyses suggest that older adults are not technologically adverse and leverage intergenerational relationships with family and friends to adjust to new technologies and to remain connected to adult children and grandchildren, especially when there is high geographic separation between them. Participants referenced younger family members as having introduced them to, and having taught them how to use, technologies such as digital devices, computers, and social networking sites. The intergenerational support in the adoption of new technologies has important implications for helping older persons to remain independent and to age in place, in both age-friendly cities and in rural communities. The findings contribute to the growing literature in the fields of gerontology and gerontechnology on intergenerational influences and the impacts of technology use in later life and suggest the flexibility and willingness of older persons to adopt to new technologies as well as the value of intergenerational relationships for overcoming barriers to technology adoption. Full article
Article
Connecting at Local Level: Exploring Opportunities for Future Design of Technology to Support Social Connections in Age-friendly Communities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5544; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155544 - 31 Jul 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1658
Abstract
Social connectedness in later life is an important dimension of an age-friendly community, with associated implications for individual health and wellbeing. In contrast with prior efforts focusing on connections at a distance or online communities where the digital technology is the interface, we [...] Read more.
Social connectedness in later life is an important dimension of an age-friendly community, with associated implications for individual health and wellbeing. In contrast with prior efforts focusing on connections at a distance or online communities where the digital technology is the interface, we explore the design opportunities and role of technology for connectedness within a geographically local community context. We present findings from interviews with 22 older adults and a linked ideation workshop. Our analysis identified shared concerns and negative perceptions around local relationships, connections and characteristics of the geographical area. However, local connectedness through technology was largely absent from day-to-day life and even perceived as contributing to disconnection. By uncovering how older adults use and perceive technology in their social lives and combining these findings with their ideas for improving local connections, we highlight the need for thoughtful consideration of the role of technology in optimising social connections within communities. Our research highlights a need for design work to understand the specifics of the local context and reduce emphasis on technology as the interface between people. We introduce an amended definition—‘underpinned by a commitment to respect and social inclusion, an age-friendly community is engaged in a strategic and ongoing process to facilitate active ageing by optimising the community’s physical, social and digital environments and its supporting infrastructure’—to conceptualise our approach. We conclude by suggesting areas for future work in developing digitally connected age-friendly communities. Full article
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Article
Smart and Age-Friendly Cities in Romania: An Overview of Public Policy and Practice
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5202; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145202 - 18 Jul 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2116
Abstract
The role of smart cities in order to improve older people’s quality of life, sustainability and opportunities, accessibility, mobility, and connectivity is increasing and acknowledged in public policy and private sector strategies in countries all over the world. Smart cities are one of [...] Read more.
The role of smart cities in order to improve older people’s quality of life, sustainability and opportunities, accessibility, mobility, and connectivity is increasing and acknowledged in public policy and private sector strategies in countries all over the world. Smart cities are one of the technological-driven initiatives that may help create an age-friendly city. Few research studies have analysed emerging countries in terms of their national strategies on smart or age-friendly cities. In this study, Romania which is predicted to become one of the most ageing countries in the European Union is used as a case study. Through document analysis, current initiatives at the local, regional, and national level addressing the issue of smart and age-friendly cities in Romania are investigated. In addition, a case study is presented to indicate possible ways of the smart cities initiatives to target and involve older adults. The role of different stakeholders is analysed in terms of whether initiatives are fragmentary or sustainable over time, and the importance of some key factors, such as private–public partnerships and transnational bodies. The results are discussed revealing the particularities of the smart cities initiatives in Romania in the time frame 2012–2020, which to date, have limited connection to the age-friendly cities agenda. Based on the findings, a set of recommendations are formulated to move the agenda forward. Full article
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Article
Effects of Technology Use on Ageing in Place: The iZi Pilots
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5052; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145052 - 14 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 979
Abstract
In the iZi study in The Hague, use and acceptance of commercially available technology by home-dwelling older citizens was studied, by comparing self-efficacy and perceived physical and mental Quality of Life (QoL)-related parameters on an intervention location of 279 households and a control [...] Read more.
In the iZi study in The Hague, use and acceptance of commercially available technology by home-dwelling older citizens was studied, by comparing self-efficacy and perceived physical and mental Quality of Life (QoL)-related parameters on an intervention location of 279 households and a control location of 301 households. Technology adoption was clinically significantly associated with increased perceived physical QoL, as compared with control group, depending on the number of technology interventions that were used. A higher number of adopted technologies was associated with a stronger effect on perceived QoL. We tried to establish a way to measure clinical significance by using mixed methods, combining quantitative and qualitative evaluation and feeding results and feedback of participants directly back into our intervention. In general, this research is promising, since it shows that successful and effective adoption of technology by older people is feasible with commercially available products amongst home-dwelling older citizens. We think this way of working provides a better integration of scientific methods and clinical usability but demands a lot of communication and patience of researchers, citizens, and policymakers. A change in policy on how to target people for this kind of intervention might be warranted. Full article
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Communication
Smart Environments and Social Robots for Age-Friendly Integrated Care Services
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3801; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17113801 - 27 May 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2377
Abstract
The world is facing major societal challenges because of an aging population that is putting increasing pressure on the sustainability of care. While demand for care and social services is steadily increasing, the supply is constrained by the decreasing workforce. The development of [...] Read more.
The world is facing major societal challenges because of an aging population that is putting increasing pressure on the sustainability of care. While demand for care and social services is steadily increasing, the supply is constrained by the decreasing workforce. The development of smart, physical, social and age-friendly environments is identified by World Health Organization (WHO) as a key intervention point for enabling older adults, enabling them to remain as much possible in their residences, delay institutionalization, and ultimately, improve quality of life. In this study, we survey smart environments, machine learning and robot assistive technologies that can offer support for the independent living of older adults and provide age-friendly care services. We describe two examples of integrated care services that are using assistive technologies in innovative ways to assess and deliver of timely interventions for polypharmacy management and for social and cognitive activity support in older adults. We describe the architectural views of these services, focusing on details about technology usage, end-user interaction flows and data models that are developed or enhanced to achieve the envisioned objective of healthier, safer, more independent and socially connected older people. Full article
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Article
Perspectives on Active Transportation in a Mid-Sized Age-Friendly City: “You Stay Home”
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(24), 4916; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16244916 - 05 Dec 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1530
Abstract
Background: Active transportation is an affordable and accessible form of transportation that facilitates the mobility of older adults in their communities. Age-friendly cities encourage and support physical activity and social participation among older adults; however, they often do not adequately address active transportation. [...] Read more.
Background: Active transportation is an affordable and accessible form of transportation that facilitates the mobility of older adults in their communities. Age-friendly cities encourage and support physical activity and social participation among older adults; however, they often do not adequately address active transportation. Our goal was to identify and understand the constraints to active transportation that older adults experience in order to inform the development of viable solutions. Methods: Focus group interviews were conducted with community dwelling older adults (n = 52) living in the City of Oshawa in Ontario, Canada; each focus group targeted a specific demographic to ensure a diverse range of perspectives were represented. Data were analyzed to identify themes; sub-group analyses were conducted to understand the experience of those from low socioeconomic status and culturally diverse groups. Results: Themes pertaining to environmental, individual, and task constraints, as well as their interactions, were identified. Of particular novelty, seemingly non-modifiable constraints (e.g., weather and personal health) interacted with modifiable constraints (e.g., urban design). Culturally diverse and lower socioeconomic groups had more favorable perspectives of their neighborhoods. Conclusion: While constraints to active transportation interact to exacerbate one another, there is an opportunity to minimize or remove constraints by implementing age-friendly policies and practices. Full article
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Article
Beyond Housing: Perceptions of Indirect Displacement, Displacement Risk, and Aging Precarity as Challenges to Aging in Place in Gentrifying Cities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4633; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234633 - 21 Nov 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2598
Abstract
Neighborhoods within age-friendly cities and communities are an important factor in shaping the everyday lives of older adults. Yet, less is known about how neighborhoods experiencing change influence the ability to age in place. One type of rapid neighborhood change occurring across major [...] Read more.
Neighborhoods within age-friendly cities and communities are an important factor in shaping the everyday lives of older adults. Yet, less is known about how neighborhoods experiencing change influence the ability to age in place. One type of rapid neighborhood change occurring across major cities nationally and globally is gentrification, a process whereby the culture of an existing neighborhood changes through the influx of more affluent residents and businesses. Few studies have considered the impact of gentrification on older adults, who are among the most vulnerable to economic and social pressures that often accompany gentrification. The current study explores one consequence of gentrification, indirect displacement. While gentrification-induced displacement can refer to the physical (e.g., direct) displacement of residents moving out of a neighborhood due to rising housing costs, it also references the replacement of the unique character and social identity of a neighborhood (e.g., indirect displacement). We examine perceptions of the latter, characterized by perceived cultural shifts and housing concerns among adults aging in place in a gentrifying neighborhood in New York City. The implications of indirect displacement for displacement risk and aging precarity are discussed as potential threats to aging in place in age-friendly cities. Full article
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Review

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Review
Quality of Life Framework for Personalised Ageing: A Systematic Review of ICT Solutions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2940; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082940 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1954
Abstract
Given the growing number of older people, society as a whole should ideally provide a higher quality of life (QoL) for its ageing citizens through the concept of personalised ageing. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are subject to constant and rapid development, and [...] Read more.
Given the growing number of older people, society as a whole should ideally provide a higher quality of life (QoL) for its ageing citizens through the concept of personalised ageing. Information and communication technologies (ICT) are subject to constant and rapid development, and can contribute to the goal of an improved QoL for older adults. In order to utilise future ICT solutions as a part of an age-friendly smart environment that helps achieve personalised ageing with an increased QoL, one must first determine whether the existing ICT solutions are satisfying the needs of older people. In order to accomplish that, this study contributes in three ways. First, it proposes a framework for the QoL of older adults, in order to provide a systematic review of the state-of-the-art literature and patents in this field. The second contribution is the finding that selected ICT solutions covered by articles and patents are intended for older adults and are validated by them. The third contribution of the study are the six recommendations that are derived from the review of the literature and the patents which would help move the agenda concerning the QoL of older people and personalised ageing with the use of ICT solutions forward. Full article
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Other

Commentary
A Commentary on Blue Zones®: A Critical Review of Age-Friendly Environments in the 21st Century and Beyond
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 837; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020837 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2384
Abstract
This paper explores the intersection of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) concepts of age-friendly communities and The Blue Zones® checklists and how the potential of integrating the two frameworks for the development of a contemporary framework can address the current gaps in [...] Read more.
This paper explores the intersection of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) concepts of age-friendly communities and The Blue Zones® checklists and how the potential of integrating the two frameworks for the development of a contemporary framework can address the current gaps in the literature as well as consider the inclusion of technology and environmental press. The commentary presented here sets out initial thoughts and explorations that have the potential to impact societies on a global scale and provides recommendations for a roadmap to consider new ways to think about the impact of health and wellbeing of older adults and their families. Additionally, this paper highlights both the strengths and the weaknesses of the aforementioned checklists and frameworks by examining the literature including the WHO age-friendly framework, the smart age-friendly ecosystem (SAfE) framework and the Blue Zones® checklists. We argue that gaps exist in the current literature and take a critical approach as a way to be inclusive of technology and the environments in which older adults live. This commentary contributes to the fields of gerontology, gerontechnology, anthropology, and geography, because we are proposing a roadmap which sets out the need for future work which requires multi- and interdisciplinary research to be conducted for the respective checklists to evolve. Full article
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Case Report
Knowing, Being and Co-Constructing an Age-Friendly Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9136; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239136 - 07 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1214
Abstract
A third of Aotearoa New Zealand’s increasingly ageing population resides in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. This most populous cosmopolitan urban area in the country is also home to the largest Polynesian population of any global city. Sprawling across a North Island isthmus inclusive of [...] Read more.
A third of Aotearoa New Zealand’s increasingly ageing population resides in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. This most populous cosmopolitan urban area in the country is also home to the largest Polynesian population of any global city. Sprawling across a North Island isthmus inclusive of Hauraki Gulf islands, 70% of the city region is rural, whilst almost 90% of the ethnically diverse residents live in urban areas. Members of Auckland Council’s Seniors Advisory Panel (SAP) advocated for, and in 2018 secured unanimous support from the governing body to resource an Age-friendly City (AFC) Project. This case study inquiry applied bricolage methodology to provide diverse contextual perspectives of this unique Polynesian setting, prior to exploring interview narratives of three SAP members who served two consecutive terms (six years) as AFC advocates. Weaving insights gleaned from their interview transcripts responding to relational leadership prompts about their age-friendly advocacy with the findings from the council’s AFC Community Engagement report highlighted the achievements and challenges of the evolving AFC Project. Service-learning recommendations include co-developing: (1) A sustainable co-governance framework for an independent steering group that embodies the values and principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi to enable empowered active ageing for all residents; (2) A succession plan that enables the timely transfer of knowledge and skills to empower incoming SAP members. Full article
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Perspective
The Academic Collaborative Center Older Adults: A Description of Co-Creation between Science, Care Practice and Education with the Aim to Contribute to Person-Centered Care for Older Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9014; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239014 - 03 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 905
Abstract
Long-term care for older adults is in transition. Organizations offering long-term care for older adults are expected to provide person-centered care (PCC) in a complex context, with older adults aging in place and participating in society for as long as possible, staff shortages [...] Read more.
Long-term care for older adults is in transition. Organizations offering long-term care for older adults are expected to provide person-centered care (PCC) in a complex context, with older adults aging in place and participating in society for as long as possible, staff shortages and the slow adoption of technological solutions. To address these challenges, these organizations increasingly use scientific knowledge to evaluate and innovate long-term care. This paper describes how co-creation, in the sense of close, intensive, and equivalent collaboration between science, care practice, and education, is a key factor in the success of improving long-term care for older adults. Such co-creation is central in the Academic Collaborative Center (ACC) Older Adults of Tilburg University. In this ACC, Tilburg University has joined forces with ten organizations that provide care for older adults and CZ zorgkantoor to create both scientific knowledge and societal impact in order to improve the quality of person-centered care for older adults. In the Netherlands, a “zorgkantoor” arranges long-term (residential) care on behalf of the national government. A zorgkantoor makes agreements on cost and quality with care providers and helps people that are in need of care to decide what the best possible option in their situation is. The CZ zorgkantoor arranges the long-term (residential) care in the south and southwest of the Netherlands. This paper describes how we create scientific knowledge to contribute to the knowledge base of PCC for older adults by conducting social scientific research in which the perspectives of older adults are central. Subsequently, we show how we create societal impact by facilitating and stimulating the use of our scientific knowledge in daily care practice. In the closing section, our ambitions for the future are discussed. Full article
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