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Open AccessArticle

How is Respect and Social Inclusion Conceptualised by Older Adults in an Aspiring Age-Friendly City? A Photovoice Study in the North-West of England

1
Department of Health Services Research and Policy, Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1H 9SH, UK
2
Department of Public Health, Policy and Systems, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3DT, UK
3
Department of Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TU, UK
4
Cambridge Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0SR, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9246; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249246
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 4 December 2020 / Accepted: 7 December 2020 / Published: 10 December 2020
The World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Age-Friendly Cities (AFC) Guide classifies key characteristics of an AFC according to eight domains. Whilst much age-friendly practice and research have focused on domains of the physical environment, those related to the social environment have received less attention. Using a Photovoice methodology within a Community-Based Participatory Research approach, our study draws on photographs, interviews and focus groups among 26 older Liverpool residents (60+ years) to explore how the city promotes respect and social inclusion (a core WHO AFC domain). Being involved in this photovoice study allowed older adults across four contrasting neighbourhoods to communicate their perspectives directly to Liverpool’s policymakers, service providers and third sector organisations. This paper provides novel insights into how: (i) respect and social inclusion are shaped by aspects of both physical and social environment, and (ii) the accessibility, affordability and sociability of physical spaces and wider social processes (e.g., neighbourhood fragmentation) contributed to or hindered participants’ health, wellbeing, intergenerational relationships and feelings of inclusion and connection. Our findings suggest that respect and social inclusion are relevant across all eight domains of the WHO AFC Guide. It is core to an AFC and should be reflected in both city-based policies and evaluations. View Full-Text
Keywords: Age-Friendly Cities; photovoice; qualitative research; healthy ageing; active ageing; older people; social inclusion; participation; UK Age-Friendly Cities; photovoice; qualitative research; healthy ageing; active ageing; older people; social inclusion; participation; UK
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ronzi, S.; Orton, L.; Buckner, S.; Bruce, N.; Pope, D. How is Respect and Social Inclusion Conceptualised by Older Adults in an Aspiring Age-Friendly City? A Photovoice Study in the North-West of England. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9246.

AMA Style

Ronzi S, Orton L, Buckner S, Bruce N, Pope D. How is Respect and Social Inclusion Conceptualised by Older Adults in an Aspiring Age-Friendly City? A Photovoice Study in the North-West of England. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(24):9246.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ronzi, Sara; Orton, Lois; Buckner, Stefanie; Bruce, Nigel; Pope, Daniel. 2020. "How is Respect and Social Inclusion Conceptualised by Older Adults in an Aspiring Age-Friendly City? A Photovoice Study in the North-West of England" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 24: 9246.

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