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Workplace Health and Wellbeing Research and Evaluation

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2406

Special Issue Editor

Health Policy and Administration, The Pennsylvania State University, Sharon, PA 16146, USA
Interests: public health; health equity; social determinants of health; behavioral sciences; gender; health & long term care; chronic illness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Workplace health and wellbeing is a fundamental aspect of health equity and social inequalities. Work-related health inequities are common in working populations and represent an increasing concern for individual workers (e.g., discrimination, job stress, mental health, and chronic illness), organisations (e.g., absenteeism and presenteeism), compensation authorities (e.g., injury, illness, and sickness claims), and governments (e.g., disability payments and economy). This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current state of knowledge regarding the links between work and health. We particularly welcome research working from critical paradigms and equity-focused approaches which pertain to social determinants of health and critical social theories (e.g., those examining race, sex/gender differences, aging in the workplace, disability/ability and ableism, and so forth). We invite new, original research papers, reviews, case reports, and conference papers to be submitted to this issue. Manuscripts that consider new approaches to interventions to prevent, treat, or improve outcomes pertaining to work and health are welcome, along with manuscripts that examine the impact of occupational factors, including risk and protective factors of wellbeing, and those that deal with workplace health protection and promotion, injury/illness prevention, and workplace screening practices and interventions. Experimental, cross-sectional, and longitudinal explorative studies of mental health and wellbeing within occupational settings are also welcome.

Dr. Iffath Syed
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diversity
  • inclusion
  • health equity
  • long COVID
  • critical disability
  • workplace disability
  • work and health
  • occupational health and safety
  • public health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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28 pages, 1674 KiB  
Article
Enterprise-Based Participatory Action Research in the Development of a Basic Occupational Health Service Model in Thailand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(8), 5538; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20085538 - 17 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1141
Abstract
Various basic occupational health services (BOHS) are provided, particularly in-plant BOHS; however, it might be necessary to start expanding BOHS. The current study focuses on BOHS model development using participatory action research (PAR) at a large-sized enterprise in northeastern Thailand. The PAR began [...] Read more.
Various basic occupational health services (BOHS) are provided, particularly in-plant BOHS; however, it might be necessary to start expanding BOHS. The current study focuses on BOHS model development using participatory action research (PAR) at a large-sized enterprise in northeastern Thailand. The PAR began with a situation analysis using ILO Convention C161, problem and cause analysis, the development of an action plan, observation and action, evaluation, and replanning. The research tools included interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs), and participant observations. The participants included managers, human resource staff, safety officers, and workers. Both inductive and deductive thematic analyses were undertaken. The results showed that (1) education and learning experience led to the workers detecting work-related diseases early by themselves and the implementation of medical surveillance programs; (2) the workers’ occupational health needs led to return-to-work assessments and first aid room system development; (3) the employer’s experience led to appropriate fit-for-work examinations and emergency preparedness; and (4) the feedback from BOHS providers led to a hospital-to-in-plant return-to-work conversion. The study concluded that the enterprise could develop fit-for-work and return-to-work assessments as per the ILO Convention C161 under the policy; however, medical surveillance and the first aid room system need to be developed through counseling at the hospital’s occupational medicine clinic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Health and Wellbeing Research and Evaluation)
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Review

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15 pages, 361 KiB  
Review
Development and Psychometric Test of the Salutogenic Survey on Sustainable Working Life for Nurses: Identifying Resistance Resources against Stress
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(2), 198; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21020198 - 08 Feb 2024
Viewed by 916
Abstract
Extensive research shows nurses’ work environment to be particularly stressful. This study develops, explores, and psychometrically tests a new profession-specific questionnaire identifying generalised and specific resistance resources, that make it possible to measure resources to manage work-related stress. An exploratory study design was [...] Read more.
Extensive research shows nurses’ work environment to be particularly stressful. This study develops, explores, and psychometrically tests a new profession-specific questionnaire identifying generalised and specific resistance resources, that make it possible to measure resources to manage work-related stress. An exploratory study design was employed. The questionnaire development was inspired by the MEASURE approach and the salutogenic theory of health. Building on the results from a literature review of nursing research and salutogenesis, supplemented by twelve interviews with hospital nurses, an item pool was generated. The first version was pilot-tested in a group of nurses who were studying to become specialist nurses. The second version of the questionnaire was psychometrically tested on a sample of registered nurses in close patient care (n = 475), analysed using confirmatory factor analysis to test seven predefined domains of the questionnaire. The analysis revealed a first order seven-domain model of 21 items: job satisfaction, professional role, work motivation, commitment, belonging in the workplace, factors and conditions for remaining in the profession, and workload. The structure of the questionnaire indicates its usefulness in clinical practice for measuring resistance resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Workplace Health and Wellbeing Research and Evaluation)
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