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Health Promotion: Physical Education in Children and Youth

Special Issue Editor

Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: physical education; school physical education; healthy physical education; game and recreation; motor skills; psychomotricity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the World Health Organization has been warning of the serious health problems deriving from the lack of physical activity in children and youth. The rates of overweight and obesity associated with a sedentary lifestyle are on the rise, and, although mechanisms are assumed to remedy it, the administration and families have not quite identified a remedy to this problem. From the educational field, from preschool to secondary school, foundations can be laid to comply with the recommendations for daily physical activity and, in turn, guide children and young people to practice sports outside of school, which is a necessary field to add and complement the dose of daily physical activity necessary for the younger population. This Special Issue aims to promote contributions pertaining to physical activity and health in children and young people.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • School physical education.
  • Sport as a vehicle for inclusion and improvement of health.
  • Psychological aspects associated with the improvement of health in children and adolescents.
  • Theoretical reviews on physical activity, sports, education and health in children and young people.
  • Active methodologies that promote physical activity and movement.
  • Methods of relaxation, breathing and mindfulness, which seek to develop physical and mental health.
  • Research on physical activity and health.

Dr. José Eugenio Rodríguez Fernández
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • school physical education
  • overweight and obesity
  • sedentary lifestyle
  • healthy lifestyles
  • physical activity
  • health
  • innovative methodologies
  • health promotion strategies
  • systematic reviews

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3494 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Service-Learning on the Prosocial and Professional Competencies in Undergraduate Physical Education Students and Its Effect on Fitness in Recipients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(20), 6918; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20206918 - 13 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1228
Abstract
Education is a key component of the student’s transformation towards the creation of a more sustainable future. Among the methodological adaptations in teaching–learning processes, Service-Learning (SL) stands out as a meaningful academic experience to respond to social needs by developing committed citizens to [...] Read more.
Education is a key component of the student’s transformation towards the creation of a more sustainable future. Among the methodological adaptations in teaching–learning processes, Service-Learning (SL) stands out as a meaningful academic experience to respond to social needs by developing committed citizens to transform society. The aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of this SL program on prosocial competence and satisfaction levels in university students, enhance physical fitness and analyze the reflections of the recipients. Moreover, the reflections on SL of the students and the migrants were analyzed. A mixed-methods design was performed. Forty-five students of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences provided a service to a migrant group that consisted of physical fitness training. The instruments implemented were the Prosocial and Civic Competence, the Impact of Service-Learning During Initial Training of Physical Activity and Sports and the reflective diary. The recipients participated in a physical fitness assessment and in a group discussion. The results show that SL in PAH contributes to pedagogical, communication, wellbeing and intercultural competences and also improves their prosocial and civic attitudes. Moreover, the recipients could enhance their physical fitness and their social interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: Physical Education in Children and Youth)
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9 pages, 635 KiB  
Article
Influence of Parental Perception of Child’s Physical Fitness on Body Image Satisfaction in Spanish Preschool Children
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(8), 5534; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20085534 - 17 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1227
Abstract
It is well known that poor physical fitness is an exponential risk factor in the increase in chronic diseases, not only physical but also psychological. Even in childhood, a critical period of development, the perception of physical fitness plays a fundamental role in [...] Read more.
It is well known that poor physical fitness is an exponential risk factor in the increase in chronic diseases, not only physical but also psychological. Even in childhood, a critical period of development, the perception of physical fitness plays a fundamental role in the individual’s self-concept of body image. Aim: To find out how self-perceived physical fitness influences self-perceived body image in preschoolers. Methods: 475 preschool pupils were recruited in the schools of Extremadura (Spain). They were administered a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Preschool Physical Fitness Index (IFIS) and the Preschool Body Scale (PBS). Findings: Significant correlations (p < 0.05) were observed between body dissatisfaction and perceived physical fitness (IFIS), being higher in girls. In terms of variables, general fitness (<0.001), cardio-respiratory fitness (<0.001), muscular strength (<0.001), speed/agility (<0.001) and balance (<0.001) have a negative, medium and significant association with body dissatisfaction in girls; however, this association was lower in the case of boys. Conclusions: The influence of physical fitness had a clear impact on self-perceived body image. With better findings on self-perceived physical fitness variables (IFIS) there was less body dissatisfaction (PBS), especially in the female sex. The results also showed that parents who perceived their children to be in poorer physical condition had higher body dissatisfaction. Therefore, it would be interesting for the context involved, particularly parents, to implement strategies to improve positive body image through the promotion of physical education and physical fitness at an early age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: Physical Education in Children and Youth)
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14 pages, 386 KiB  
Article
A Look at the Interconnection of Dimensions of Knowledge in Physical Education Teacher Training in Chile
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(4), 3249; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20043249 - 13 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1068
Abstract
The massive fragmentation of knowledge that exists in the current field of physical education enables us to research pedagogical and disciplinary aspects in the educational processes of teachers in training, as this has significant implications for future educational practices. This study proposes to [...] Read more.
The massive fragmentation of knowledge that exists in the current field of physical education enables us to research pedagogical and disciplinary aspects in the educational processes of teachers in training, as this has significant implications for future educational practices. This study proposes to assess the dimensions of knowledge (conceptual, procedural and attitudinal) that stem from the learnings that emerge in physical education teacher training in terms of the disciplinary standards proposed by the Chilean Education Ministry for the Preservice Teacher Education. The study methodology was descriptive and inferential, and the cohort was cross-sectional. A total of 750 fourth- and fifth-year students in training from 13 Chilean universities participated. Of these, 619 subjects were considered: 54.6% (338) men and 45.4% (281) women between the ages of 21 and 25. The questionnaire used for data collection was the “Questionnaire on Conceptual, Procedural and Attitudinal Learning in Preservice Teacher Education in Physical Education” (CACPA-FIDEF), prepared as part of Fondecyt project No. 11190537. The main results indicate that there are no statistically significant differences in the three dimensions in terms of students’ sex and type of schooling, with p values > 0.05. In conclusion, the study observed a weak conceptual management of the discipline in future teachers, revealing once again the need to seek out didactic alternatives that enable teachers in training to understand the importance of the conceptual dimension in their learning and teaching processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: Physical Education in Children and Youth)
13 pages, 696 KiB  
Article
Moderate–Vigorous Physical Activity, Screen Time and Sleep Time Profiles: A Cluster Analysis in Spanish Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 2004; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20032004 - 21 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1720
Abstract
The study had two aims: (1) To classify the adolescents according to their levels of moderate–vigorous physical activity, screen time and sleep time, and (2) to analyze, in a descriptive and correlational manner, the profiles of moderate–vigorous physical activity, screen time and sleep [...] Read more.
The study had two aims: (1) To classify the adolescents according to their levels of moderate–vigorous physical activity, screen time and sleep time, and (2) to analyze, in a descriptive and correlational manner, the profiles of moderate–vigorous physical activity, screen time and sleep time of each cluster according to the sex and grade of the adolescents. The study design was cross-sectional, with descriptive and correlational analysis. The sample consisted of 663 adolescents in Compulsory Secondary Education from Soria (Spain). The Four by One-Day Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure levels of physical activity, screen time and sleep time. The results showed that the young people had an average of 67.99 ± min/day of moderate–vigorous physical activity, 112.56 min/day of screen time and 548.63 min/day of sleep time. Adolescents were classified into three clusters according to their levels of physical activity, screen time and sleep time (FMANOVA (6,1318) = 314.439; p ≤ 0.001; β = 1; f = 1.177). In conclusion, only 28.21% of the young people accomplished the recommendations for physical activity practice, screen time and sleep time. Moreover, these results vary according to the sex and grade of the adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Promotion: Physical Education in Children and Youth)
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