Special Issue "New Advances in Stained Glass Research: Materials, Production Techniques and Conservation"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 9347

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marcia Vilarigues
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Guest Editor
VICARTE, Research Unit Vidro e Ceramica para as Artes, FCT/UNL, Campus Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal
Dr. Sophie Wolf
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Guest Editor
Vitrocentre Romont, 1680 Romont, Switzerland
Interests: history, technology and conservation of stained glass and reverse glass paintings
Dr. Teresa Palomar
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Guest Editor
Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICV-CSIC), Madrid, Spain
Interests: glass; stained-glass windows; degradation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The history of stained glass has fascinated researchers since the 19th century. Over the past two or three decades there has been a remarkable increase of research into stained glass. Developments in the field of non-destructive analysis and the use of interdisciplinary approaches have opened up new perspectives, and research continues to offer new insights into the materials and techniques used in stained glass production and to provide information about the creative process, traditions, the connections between artists and workshops from divers art fields and, not at least, about the deterioration and the conservation of these fragile artworks. Open-access databases and modern digital technologies promote scientific exchange between research communities as well as among an interested public. Heritage, an international peer-reviewed open-access journal of cultural and natural heritage science published quarterly by MDPI, has therefore launched a call for papers for a special issue dedicated to the latest results in the field of stained glass research.

Contributions on the following themes are welcome:
- Technical aspects of the production of stained glass
- The degradation of stained glass
- Stained glass conservation
- The importance of databases in the field of stained glass research.

As guest editors of this issue, we would like to invite you to submit original research papers and articles that provide an up-to-date critical overview of research in one of the aforementioned fields. Please feel free to forward this call for papers to your colleagues and students.

We look forward to receiving your contribution!

Dr. Marcia Vilarigues
Dr. Sophie Wolf
Dr. Teresa Palomar
Guest Editors

Manuscript submission

Manuscripts may be submitted from now until 31 October 2022. They are to be submitted online via the journal’s website. For further information and submission instructions, please follow the link to the Special Issue Website at: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/heritage/special_issues/stained_glass#info.

Reviewing process and publication

All papers will be peer-reviewed by at least two reviewers. The peer-reviewing process should take no longer than 6 weeks from the moment of submission. Articles will be available online as soon as they are accepted. The official launch of the special issue will be in January 2022 and coincide with the beginning of the International Year of Glass (http://www.iyog2022.org/).

Time table

Deadline of submission: 31 October 2022

Official launch of the special issue: January 2022 (International Year of Glass 2022)

Publication fee

Heritage is an open access journal. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). However, the publisher MDPI has several policies in place to support authors who cannot afford the APC by either waiving the fee or by giving a 50% reduction. Please contact the Managing Editor of the Heritage Editorial Office, Ginny Zhang ([email protected]) for further information and conditions for support.

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Comparison of Hyperspectral Imaging and Fiber-Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy for Reflectance and Transmittance Measurements of Colored Glass
Heritage 2022, 5(3), 1401-1418; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage5030073 - 23 Jun 2022
Viewed by 496
Abstract
The work presented in this paper is part of a wider research project, which aims at documenting and analyzing stained glass windows by means of hyperspectral imaging. This technique shares some similarities with UV-VIS-IR spectroscopy, as they both provide spectral information; however, spectral [...] Read more.
The work presented in this paper is part of a wider research project, which aims at documenting and analyzing stained glass windows by means of hyperspectral imaging. This technique shares some similarities with UV-VIS-IR spectroscopy, as they both provide spectral information; however, spectral imaging has the additional advantage of providing spatial information, since a spectrum can be collected in each pixel of the image. Compared to UV-VIS-IR spectroscopy, spectral imaging has rarely been used for the investigation of stained glass windows. One of the objectives of this paper is, thus, to compare the performance of these two instruments to validate the results of hyperspectral imaging. The second objective is to evaluate the potential of analyzing colored-glass pieces in reflectance modality and compare the results with those obtained in transmittance, in order to highlight the differences and similarities between the two approaches. The geometry of the systems and the backing material for the glass, as well as the characteristics of the glass pieces, are discussed. L*a*b* values obtained from the spectra, as well as the calculated color difference ΔE00, are provided, to show the degree of agreement between the instruments and the two measurement modalities. Full article
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Article
An Overview of Germanic Grisailles through the Stained-Glass Collection at Pena Palace
Heritage 2022, 5(2), 1003-1023; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage5020055 - 15 May 2022
Viewed by 787
Abstract
The lack of studies reporting the characterisation of Germanic grisaille is evident, despite the recent interest of researchers in this glass painting material. This work consists of the first assessment of Germanic grisaille’ chemical composition on a wide chronology (14th–19th centuries), that was [...] Read more.
The lack of studies reporting the characterisation of Germanic grisaille is evident, despite the recent interest of researchers in this glass painting material. This work consists of the first assessment of Germanic grisaille’ chemical composition on a wide chronology (14th–19th centuries), that was only possible through the unique stained-glass collection of King Ferdinand II of Portugal. From the considerable amount of panels produced in Germanic territory and assembled by Ferdinand, twenty-two panels were characterised, and some trends of glass support typical composition and grisaille recipes were verified through this case study. A copper-based grisaille appears to have been the preference up to the 18th century. The 19th century shows higher diversity in composition, with new compounds (such as Co, Cr, Mn) appearing as colourising materials. However, with a limited number of analyses, and dispersed throughout time and different geographic locations, the results of this study are unprecedented, by being able to present the first overview on grisaille composition in Germanic stained glasses. Full article
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Article
Austrian Stained Glass in the Interplay of Research and Conservation: Reflections on How to Preserve an Endangered Art Genre
Heritage 2022, 5(1), 509-525; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage5010029 - 10 Mar 2022
Viewed by 1020
Abstract
In 2021, two projects for the protection and preservation of Austrian stained glass were performed in close cooperation between the Federal Monuments Authority Austria and active members of the Corpus Vitrearum Austria. Both projects are dedicated to difficult topics that will increasingly challenge [...] Read more.
In 2021, two projects for the protection and preservation of Austrian stained glass were performed in close cooperation between the Federal Monuments Authority Austria and active members of the Corpus Vitrearum Austria. Both projects are dedicated to difficult topics that will increasingly challenge how we tackle the preservation of monuments in the coming decades. There are questions regarding the correct conservation and restoration treatment of stained glass from the late 19th and early 20th century (stained glass from the so-called art period of Historicism), which, despite all the Guidelines for the Conservation and Restoration of this endangered genre of art, is still far from being treated with the necessary care throughout the country. The protection and preservation of the original substance—the glass, the leading and the painting—are the primary focus of interest here. Using the example of the restoration campaign currently being conducted on the windows of St. Mary’s Cathedral, Linz, a cultural monument of particular importance for Austria, work is being undertaken to elaborate the feasibility of a concept that can be easily implemented in the future at other construction sites and by all the stakeholders involved. The second monitoring project presented concerns the equally important area of “preventive conservation” of medieval and modern stained glass. The focus of the work that took place here was on checking the condition of stained glass from the Middle Ages to the 20th century (with and without exterior protective glazing) and the general identification of damage and determination of the urgency of measures for conservation (using a “traffic light system” developed for this purpose). Full article
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Article
XRF Imaging (MA-XRF) as a Valuable Method in the Analysis of Nonhomogeneous Structures of Grisaille Paint Layers
Heritage 2021, 4(4), 3193-3207; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage4040179 - 09 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 654
Abstract
Stained glass paint layers made with vitreous paints can be a challenging subject for analyses. Their heterogenic structure requires proper experimental methodology in order to obtain valuable data. The main goal of this paper is to present the advantages of macro-XRF scanning (MA-XRF) [...] Read more.
Stained glass paint layers made with vitreous paints can be a challenging subject for analyses. Their heterogenic structure requires proper experimental methodology in order to obtain valuable data. The main goal of this paper is to present the advantages of macro-XRF scanning (MA-XRF) in the non-destructive investigation of historical grisaille paint layers on the basis of research conducted on seven stained glass panels from the Dominican Monastery in Kraków, the Diocesan Museum in Kielce and the National Museum in Poznań (Poland). The obtained results showed the capabilities of MA-XRF scanning in technology recognition, the legibility of damaged fragments of painted depictions, as well as with distinguishing the elemental composition between vitreous paints in different colours. Additionally, SEM-EDS measurements are presented so as to acquire quantitative results and additional information concerning light elements. Full article
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Article
Dating Nathan: The Oldest Stained Glass Window in England?
Heritage 2021, 4(2), 937-960; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage4020051 - 05 Jun 2021
Viewed by 3655
Abstract
Relatively little is known about stained glass windows in England predating c. 1170; however, art-historical evaluation by Caviness (1987) argued that four figures from the “Ancestors series” of Canterbury Cathedral, usually dated to the late 12th and early 13th century, in fact date [...] Read more.
Relatively little is known about stained glass windows in England predating c. 1170; however, art-historical evaluation by Caviness (1987) argued that four figures from the “Ancestors series” of Canterbury Cathedral, usually dated to the late 12th and early 13th century, in fact date earlier (c. 1130–1160). This would place them amongst the earliest stained glass in England, and the world. Building on our previous work, we address Caviness’s hypothesis using a methodology based upon analysis of a few, well-measured heavy trace elements and a 3D-printed attachment for a pXRF spectrometer that facilitates in situ analysis. The results confirm two major periods of “recycling” or re-using medieval glass. The first is consistent with Caviness’s argument that figures predating the 1174 fire were reused in the early 13th century. The results suggest that in addition to figures, ornamental borders were reused, indicating the presence of more early glass than previously thought. In the second period of recycling (1790s), surviving figures from the Ancestors series were removed and adapted into rectangular panels for insertion into large Perpendicular-style windows elsewhere in the cathedral. The results show that the glasses used to adapt the panels to a rectangular shape were broadly contemporary with the glasses used to glaze the original Ancestors windows, again representing a more extensive presence of medieval glass in the windows. Full article
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