Special Issue "Medication Adherence and Beliefs About Medication"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Medication Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sara Garfield
Website
Guest Editor
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, UCL School of Pharmacy
Interests: patients' perceptions of medication; factors influencing patients' decisions about treatment; shared decision making; medication adherence; safety and quality of medication use
Dr. Gaby Judah
Website
Guest Editor
Imperial College London, London, UK
Interests: behaviour change; medication adherence; habit formation; patient safety; predictors of health related behaviours

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The scope of this Special Issue is to disseminate research evidence on patients’ and carers’ beliefs about and experiences of medicines, including barriers and facilitators to taking medication, and how these might impact medication adherence. The Issue will include research on the development and testing of interventions to increase adherence, particularly when these are grounded in the patient/carer perspective. Research relating to shared decision-making about medicines between patients and healthcare professionals is within the scope of the Issue. 

Submissions may be quantitative, qualitative, or mixed-methods research or reviews that meet established review standards, and data may be from primary or secondary sources. All types of study design will be considered. All healthcare settings, including acute care, long-term care, community and home care, mental health, and primary care will be included. All populations and medical conditions will be considered. 

Dr. Sara Garfield
Dr. Gaby Judah
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Medicines
  • Shared decision-making
  • Patients
  • Carers
  • Beliefs
  • Attitudes
  • Barriers
  • Facilitators

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Qualitative Application of Temporal Self-Regulation Theory to Understand Adherence to Simple and Complex Medication Regimens
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040487 - 16 Nov 2020
Abstract
Medication adherence is a global health concern, and variables of temporal self-regulation theory (TST) have been shown to be important in improving adherence. This qualitative study aims to explore how TST can help explain medication adherence in people’s daily lives, and whether there [...] Read more.
Medication adherence is a global health concern, and variables of temporal self-regulation theory (TST) have been shown to be important in improving adherence. This qualitative study aims to explore how TST can help explain medication adherence in people’s daily lives, and whether there are differences in the adherence to simple and complex medication regimens. Twenty-nine participants from Australia engaged in semi-structured interviews based on TST (intention, behavioural prepotency, self-regulation), and other variables important to adherence. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Six themes were identified (Routines, External Supports, Cost, Sense of Agency, Adverse Outcomes, and Weighing Up Pros and Cons), with partial support for TST (specifically intention, past behaviour, cues and planning). Four themes not related to TST were also identified. Individuals with more complex medication regimens spoke of the importance of routines, planning, and knowledge-seeking, whereas those with simpler regimens spoke of the importance of visual cues. TST may be useful for identifying some variables important in medication adherence, however, additional factors were also identified. For simple regimens, future research should focus on the manipulation of visual cues. For complex regimens, health professionals should consider supporting the use of medication management apps to assist in planning and ensuring a consistent routine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medication Adherence and Beliefs About Medication)
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