Next Article in Journal
The Relationship between Technology Use and Physical Activity among Typically-Developing Children
Previous Article in Journal
Continuity of Care and the Quality of Life among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study in Taiwan
Open AccessArticle

A Qualitative Application of Temporal Self-Regulation Theory to Understand Adherence to Simple and Complex Medication Regimens

Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine Research Group, School of Psychology, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia 6021, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040487
Received: 15 October 2020 / Revised: 9 November 2020 / Accepted: 12 November 2020 / Published: 16 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medication Adherence and Beliefs About Medication)
Medication adherence is a global health concern, and variables of temporal self-regulation theory (TST) have been shown to be important in improving adherence. This qualitative study aims to explore how TST can help explain medication adherence in people’s daily lives, and whether there are differences in the adherence to simple and complex medication regimens. Twenty-nine participants from Australia engaged in semi-structured interviews based on TST (intention, behavioural prepotency, self-regulation), and other variables important to adherence. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Six themes were identified (Routines, External Supports, Cost, Sense of Agency, Adverse Outcomes, and Weighing Up Pros and Cons), with partial support for TST (specifically intention, past behaviour, cues and planning). Four themes not related to TST were also identified. Individuals with more complex medication regimens spoke of the importance of routines, planning, and knowledge-seeking, whereas those with simpler regimens spoke of the importance of visual cues. TST may be useful for identifying some variables important in medication adherence, however, additional factors were also identified. For simple regimens, future research should focus on the manipulation of visual cues. For complex regimens, health professionals should consider supporting the use of medication management apps to assist in planning and ensuring a consistent routine. View Full-Text
Keywords: temporal self-regulation theory; medication adherence; complexity; routines; cues; planning temporal self-regulation theory; medication adherence; complexity; routines; cues; planning
MDPI and ACS Style

Liddelow, C.; Mullan, B.; Boyes, M.; McBride, H. A Qualitative Application of Temporal Self-Regulation Theory to Understand Adherence to Simple and Complex Medication Regimens. Healthcare 2020, 8, 487. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040487

AMA Style

Liddelow C, Mullan B, Boyes M, McBride H. A Qualitative Application of Temporal Self-Regulation Theory to Understand Adherence to Simple and Complex Medication Regimens. Healthcare. 2020; 8(4):487. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040487

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liddelow, Caitlin; Mullan, Barbara; Boyes, Mark; McBride, Hannah. 2020. "A Qualitative Application of Temporal Self-Regulation Theory to Understand Adherence to Simple and Complex Medication Regimens" Healthcare 8, no. 4: 487. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040487

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop