Special Issue "Health Care Management and Cost Estimation"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Thomas G. Poder
Website
Guest Editor
School of public health, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada
Interests: efficiency; health related quality of life; cost; health preferences; health technology assessment
Prof. Maude Laberge
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Administration, Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada
Interests: health system performance; efficiency; health policy; resource allocation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cost-efficiency is a cornerstone in healthcare management. Facing hard budget constraints, decision-makers must make the best use of the resources dedicated to the section of healthcare they lead. In this aim, they benefit from the use of many instruments, from cost-minimization to cost-benefit analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). One of their main challenge is to perform trade-offs that consider the values and preferences of the stakeholders. To date, plenty of research is conducted in this field and relates, for example, to instrument development to measure cost, risk assessment, data management, etc. This Special Issue is open to the subject area of healthcare management and cost-efficiency. The keywords listed below provide an outline of some of the possible areas of interest. 

Prof. Dr. Thomas G. Poder
Prof. Maude Laberge
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Healthcare management
  • Cost-efficiency
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Quality-adjusted life-year
  • Health preference
  • Health technology assessment
  • Health care
  • Health economics
  • Decision making
  • Patient-oriented research
  • Health policy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of SF-6D Health State Utility Scores: Is Beta Regression Appropriate?
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 525; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040525 - 01 Dec 2020
Abstract
Background: Typically, modeling of health-related quality of life data is often troublesome since its distribution is positively or negatively skewed, spikes at zero or one, bounded and heteroscedasticity. Objectives: In the present paper, we aim to investigate whether Bayesian beta regression [...] Read more.
Background: Typically, modeling of health-related quality of life data is often troublesome since its distribution is positively or negatively skewed, spikes at zero or one, bounded and heteroscedasticity. Objectives: In the present paper, we aim to investigate whether Bayesian beta regression is appropriate for analyzing the SF-6D health state utility scores and respondent characteristics. Methods: A sample of 126 Lebanese members from the American University of Beirut valued 49 health states defined by the SF-6D using the standard gamble technique. Three different models were fitted for SF-6D via Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation methods. These comprised a beta regression, random effects and random effects with covariates. Results from applying the three Bayesian beta regression models were reported and compared based on their predictive ability to previously used linear regression models, using mean prediction error (MPE), root mean squared error (RMSE) and deviance information criterion (DIC). Results: For the three different approaches, the beta regression model was found to perform better than the normal regression model under all criteria used. The beta regression with random effects model performs best, with MPE (0.084), RMSE (0.058) and DIC (−1621). Compared to the traditionally linear regression model, the beta regression provided better predictions of observed values in the entire learning sample and in an out-of-sample validation. Conclusions: Beta regression provides a flexible approach to modeling health state values. It also accounted for the boundedness and heteroscedasticity of the SF-6D index scores. Further research is encouraged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care Management and Cost Estimation)
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Open AccessArticle
Translation and Cultural Adaptation of the Patient Self-Administered Financial Effects (P-SAFE) Questionnaire to Assess the Financial Burden of Cancer in French-Speaking Patients
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040366 - 25 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
People living with and beyond cancer (PLC) experience financial hardship associated with the disease and its treatment. Research demonstrates that the “economic toxicity” of cancer can cause distress and impair well-being, health-related quality of life and, ultimately, survival. The Patient Self-Administered Financial Effects [...] Read more.
People living with and beyond cancer (PLC) experience financial hardship associated with the disease and its treatment. Research demonstrates that the “economic toxicity” of cancer can cause distress and impair well-being, health-related quality of life and, ultimately, survival. The Patient Self-Administered Financial Effects (P-SAFE) questionnaire was created in Canada and tested in English. The objective of this study is to describe the processes of translation and cultural adaptation of the P-SAFE for use with French speaking PLC in Canada. The Canadian P-SAFE questionnaire was translated from English to French in collaboration with the developer of the initial version, according to the 12-step process recommended by the Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) Consortium. These steps include forward and backward translation, a multidisciplinary expert committee, and cross-cultural validation using think-aloud, probing techniques, and clarity scoring during cognitive interviewing. Translation and validation of the P-SAFE questionnaire were performed without major difficulties. Minor changes were made to better fit with the vocabulary used in the public healthcare system in Quebec. The mean score for clarity of questions was 6.4 out of a possible 7 (totally clear) Cognitive interviewing revealed that lengthy questionnaire instructions could be confusing. Our team produced a Canadian-French version of the P-SAFE. After minor rewording in the instructions, the P-SAFE questionnaire appears culturally appropriate for use with French-speaking PLC in Canada. Further testing of the French version will require evaluation of psychometric properties of validity and reliability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Care Management and Cost Estimation)
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