Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Critical Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 5756

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de A Coruña, A Coruña 15006, Spain
Interests: anesthesiology; perioperative medicine; airway management

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Guest Editor
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lodz, 90-419 Lodz, Poland
Interests: airway management; anesthesiology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surgical activity has undergone significant changes in recent decades. Technological development has allowed the performance of increasingly complex surgical procedures and the expansion of indications to greater aggressiveness. Likewise, the increase in life expectancy has determined a progressive population aging and that the surgical population presents a greater degree of frailty. Therefore, the number of interventions, as well as the complexity of perioperative management, have experienced a parallel increase. In this context, health systems must adapt resources and the healthcare delivery model to continue providing efficient and quality care. The field of perioperative medicine is the niche to implement this necessary transformation.

In this Special Issue, all professionals involved in perioperative care are encouraged to submit manuscripts related to preoperative evaluation, prehabilitation, enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS), multimodal analgesia, anesthetic management, implementation and adherence to evidence-based medicine protocols, health management, and all those topics on perioperative medicine that allow optimizing a patient’s medical condition before surgery, postoperative outcomes, and quality of life of the surgical population.

Dr. Manuel Ángel Gómez-Ríos
Prof. Dr. Tomasz M. Gaszyński
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • anesthesiology
  • perioperative medicine
  • prehabilitation
  • multimodal treatment
  • evidence-based practice
  • healthcare economics and organizations

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 685 KiB  
Article
The Reliability of Carotid Artery Doppler Ultrasonography Indices in Predicting Fluid Responsiveness during Surgery for Geriatric Patients: A Prospective, Observational Study
by Beliz Bilgili, Ayten Saracoglu, Kemal T. Saracoglu, Pawel Ratajczyk and Alper Kararmaz
Healthcare 2024, 12(7), 783; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12070783 - 3 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: The reliability of determining fluid responsiveness during surgery in geriatric patients is challenging. Our primary outcome was to determine the reliability of Corrected Flow Time (FTc) in predicting fluid responsiveness. Methods: Elderly patients undergoing major surgery under general anesthesia were included. Measurements [...] Read more.
Background: The reliability of determining fluid responsiveness during surgery in geriatric patients is challenging. Our primary outcome was to determine the reliability of Corrected Flow Time (FTc) in predicting fluid responsiveness. Methods: Elderly patients undergoing major surgery under general anesthesia were included. Measurements of common carotid artery diameter, velocity time integral, and systolic flow time (FT) were performed before and after a fluid challenge. FTc and carotid blood flow (CBF) were subsequently calculated. Results: The median change in carotid diameter was significantly higher in the fluid-responder (R) compared to the non-responder (NR) (6.51% vs. 0.65%, p = 0.049). The median change in CBF was notably higher in R compared to NR (30.04% vs. 9.72%, p = 0.024). Prior to the fluid challenge, systolic FT was significantly shorter in R than NR (285 ms vs. 315 ms, p = 0.027), but after the fluid challenge, these measurements became comparable among the groups. The change in systolic FT was higher in R (15.38% vs. 7.49%, p = 0.027). FTc and the change in FTc exhibited similarities among the groups at all study time points. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.682 (95% CI: 0.509–0.855, p = 0.039) for carotid diameter, 0.710 (95% CI: 0.547–0.872, p = 0.011) for CBF, 0.706 (95% CI: 0.540–0.872, p = 0.015) for systolic FT, and 0.580 (95% CI = 0.389–0.770, p = 0.413) for FTc. Conclusions: In geriatric patients, potential endothelial changes in the carotid artery may influence the dynamic markers of fluid responsiveness. Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of FTc in predicting fluid responsiveness in the general population, this study underscores the limited reliability of carotid Doppler ultrasonography indices for prediction in a geriatric patient population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine)
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7 pages, 764 KiB  
Communication
Disinfection of Reusable Laryngoscopes: A Survey about the Clinical Practice in Spain
by Manuel Á. Gómez-Ríos, José Alfonso Sastre, Teresa López and Tomasz Gaszyński
Healthcare 2023, 11(8), 1117; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11081117 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1376
Abstract
Airway device-associated infections resulting from the cross-contamination of reusable laryngoscopes are one of the main causes of healthcare-associated infections. Laryngoscope blades are highly contaminated with various pathogens, including Gram-negative bacilli, which can cause prolonged hospitalization, high morbidity and mortality risks, the development of [...] Read more.
Airway device-associated infections resulting from the cross-contamination of reusable laryngoscopes are one of the main causes of healthcare-associated infections. Laryngoscope blades are highly contaminated with various pathogens, including Gram-negative bacilli, which can cause prolonged hospitalization, high morbidity and mortality risks, the development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, and significant costs. Despite the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ recommendations, this national survey of 248 Spanish anesthesiologists showed that there is great variability in the processing of reusable laryngoscopes in Spain. Nearly a third of the respondents did not have an institutional disinfection protocol, and 45% of them did not know the disinfection procedure used. Good practices for the prevention and control of cross-contamination can be ensured through compliance with evidence-based guidelines, education of healthcare providers, and audits of clinical practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine)
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Review

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14 pages, 594 KiB  
Review
Anesthetic Considerations for Patients with Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Narrative Review
by Krzysztof Laudanski, Omar Elmadhoun, Amal Mathew, Yul Kahn-Pascual, Mitchell J. Kerfeld, James Chen, Daniella C. Sisniega and Francisco Gomez
Healthcare 2024, 12(8), 858; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12080858 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 891
Abstract
Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant demyelinating neuropathy characterized by an increased susceptibility to peripheral nerve injury from trauma, compression, or shear forces. Patients with this condition are unique, necessitating distinct considerations for anesthesia and surgical teams. [...] Read more.
Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant demyelinating neuropathy characterized by an increased susceptibility to peripheral nerve injury from trauma, compression, or shear forces. Patients with this condition are unique, necessitating distinct considerations for anesthesia and surgical teams. This review describes the etiology, prevalence, clinical presentation, and management of HNPP and presents contemporary evidence and recommendations for optimal care for HNPP patients in the perioperative period. While the incidence of HNPP is reported at 7–16:100,000, this figure may be an underestimation due to underdiagnosis, further complicating medicolegal issues. With the subtle nature of symptoms associated with HNPP, patients with this condition may remain unrecognized during the perioperative period, posing significant risks. Several aspects of caring for this population, including anesthetic choices, intraoperative positioning, and monitoring strategy, may deviate from standard practices. As such, a tailored approach to caring for this unique population, coupled with meticulous preoperative planning, is crucial and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine)
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Other

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11 pages, 4747 KiB  
Case Report
Management of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Ruptures Post Total Knee Arthroplasty by Kesler Technique Using Fiber Tape
by Waleed Ahmad AlShaafi, Mohammed Hassan Alqahtani, Abdullah Hassan Assiri, Abdulrhman Abdullah Alqhtani, Jaya Shanker Tedla and Dhuha Saeed Motlag
Healthcare 2023, 11(5), 631; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11050631 - 21 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1921
Abstract
Total knee arthroplasty is an effective way to manage osteoarthritis patients surgically. However, patients may encounter post-surgical complications, such as quadriceps rupture in rare instances, in addition to surgical complications. In our clinical practice, we encountered a 67-year-old Saudi male patient with a [...] Read more.
Total knee arthroplasty is an effective way to manage osteoarthritis patients surgically. However, patients may encounter post-surgical complications, such as quadriceps rupture in rare instances, in addition to surgical complications. In our clinical practice, we encountered a 67-year-old Saudi male patient with a rare bilateral quadriceps rupture two weeks post-total knee arthroplasty. The cause of the bilateral rupture was a history of falls in both knees. The patient was reported to our clinic with clinical features like pain in the knee joint, immobility, and bilateral swelling in the knees. The X-ray did not show any periprosthetic fracture, but an ultrasound of the anterior thigh revealed a complete cut of the quadriceps tendon on both sides. The repair of the bilateral quadriceps tendon was done by direct repair using the Kessler technique and was reinforced with fiber tape. Following knee immobilization for six weeks, the patient began intensive physical therapy management to decrease pain, enhance muscle strength, and increase range of motion. After rehabilitation, the patient regained a complete range of motion in the knee and improved functionality, and he could walk independently without crutches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine)
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