Special Issue "Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Chronic Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Junghoon Lee
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Physical Therapy, College of Nursing, Healthcare Sciences and Human Ecology, Dong-Eui University, Busan, Korea
2. Integrated Physical Medicine Institute, Dong-Eui University, Busan, Korea
Interests: kinesiology taping; balance control; physiotherapy for sports injuries; musculoskeletal disorders; physiotherapy; muscle fatigue; cross taping; orthosis for misalignment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the performance of sportsmen and participation of broad population in the active lifestyle are increasing, the call for more effective training methods and improvement of the quality of physical care appears to be more appealing. Thus, proper understanding of physical movement along with its adequate intensity became a critical part of any elevated physical activity. In case of professional sportsmen, the responsibility for their physical condition applies to physiotherapists and trainers, who nowadays tend to be inspiration for the general public. Therefore, it is essential, the physiotherapists and trainers not only persistently update their knowledge and practices, but also renounce techniques that were proved to be inefficient or even harmful to human body. Consequences of these harmful methods are commonly visible particularly in case of young sportsmen, who due to improper training methods or immoderate intensity suffer with chronic pain or severe injuries later in age and are compelled to suspend or in more critical case quit their career earlier than expected.

In many cases, the pain can be alleviated or even completely eliminated through diverse methods of physical rehabilitation. However, physical rehabilitation should not be only focused on the elimination of pain and after-effects of injury, but also on detection of primary cause of the pain, so the prevention of injury’s origin later in time might be more effective. Although there are know many effective treatment methods at the present time, it is essential making constant progress in development of these techniques, so they can bring better and faster effects.

This Special Issue of Healthcare will collect wide range of research papers on the theme of physical rehabilitation, physiotherapy, and prevention in sports injuries for improving pre-injury policy and offering more effective post-injury treatment to help individuals to retrieve their physical health.

Prof. Junghoon Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical rehabilitation
  • physiotherapy
  • sports rehabilitation
  • sport sciences
  • athletic training
  • prevention
  • methods of rehabilitation
  • sports injuries
  • movement quality
  • healthcare
  • development
  • physical health
  • balance control
  • muscle fatigue
  • physical exercise

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
The Guidelines for Application of Kinesiology Tape for Prevention and Treatment of Sports Injuries
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020144 - 26 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1083
Abstract
The number of kinesiology tape’s users is increasing year by year. However, the insufficiency of fundamental knowledge about the appropriate usage of kinesiology tapes can generate undesired side-effects caused by incorrect application of kinesiology tapes and/or denouncement of kinesiology tapes as an ineffective [...] Read more.
The number of kinesiology tape’s users is increasing year by year. However, the insufficiency of fundamental knowledge about the appropriate usage of kinesiology tapes can generate undesired side-effects caused by incorrect application of kinesiology tapes and/or denouncement of kinesiology tapes as an ineffective practice. Therefore, it is necessary to arrange a set of general guidelines of kinesiology taping that must be followed. If not, the treatment may have to be ceased due to the side-effects such as skin’s troubles. Another problem, which impeaches effectivity of treatment by kinesiology tapes, is focusing solely on the present area of pain or discomfort. However, such solution is only short-termed and the likelihood of reappearance of the pain is remarkably high. Therefore, it is essential to find and eliminate the origin of the problem. If these fundamentals conditions of tape’s application are satisfied, the treatment by kinesiology tapes may bring us far more better results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Biomechanical Analysis of Serious Neck Injuries Resulting from Judo
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020214 - 16 Feb 2021
Viewed by 215
Abstract
To establish a basis for initial diagnosis and for proposing preventive measures for the serious neck injuries occasionally experienced by judo practitioners, the biomechanical mechanisms of these injuries were analyzed. Two male judo experts repeatedly threw an anthropomorphic test device (POLAR dummy) using [...] Read more.
To establish a basis for initial diagnosis and for proposing preventive measures for the serious neck injuries occasionally experienced by judo practitioners, the biomechanical mechanisms of these injuries were analyzed. Two male judo experts repeatedly threw an anthropomorphic test device (POLAR dummy) using three throwing techniques (Seoi-nage, Osoto-gari, and Ouchi-gari). The dummy’s kinematic data were captured using a high-speed digital camera, and the load and moment of the neck were measured with load cells. The neck injury criterion (Nij) and beam criterion were also calculated. In Seoi-nage, the anterior and parietal regions of the dummy’s head contacted the tatami (judo mat). Subsequently, most of the body weight was applied, with the neck experiencing the highest compression. However, in Osoto-gari and Ouchi-gari, the occipital region of the dummy’s head contacted the tatami. Significantly higher values of both Nij (median 0.68) and beam criterion (median 0.90) corresponding to a 34.7% to 37.1% risk of neck injury with an abbreviated injury scale score ≥2 were shown in Seoi-nage than in either Ouchi-gari or Osoto-gari. In judo, when thrown by the Seoi-nage technique, serious neck injuries can occur as a result of neck compression that occurs when the head contacts the ground. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
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Open AccessArticle
The Real Time Geometric Effect of a Lordotic Curve-Controlled Spinal Traction Device: A Randomized Cross Over Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020125 - 27 Jan 2021
Viewed by 316
Abstract
Background: A standard spinal traction (ST) device was designed to straighten the spine without considering physiological lumbar lordosis. Using lordotic curve-controlled traction (LCCT), which maintains the lordotic curve during traction, the traction force would be applied to the posterior spinal structure effectively. Thus, [...] Read more.
Background: A standard spinal traction (ST) device was designed to straighten the spine without considering physiological lumbar lordosis. Using lordotic curve-controlled traction (LCCT), which maintains the lordotic curve during traction, the traction force would be applied to the posterior spinal structure effectively. Thus, the purpose of our study was to evaluate real-time biomechanical changes while applying the LCCT and ST. Methods: In this study, 40 subjects with mild non-radicular low back pain (LBP) were included. The participants underwent LCCT and ST in random order. Anterior and posterior intervertebral distance, ratios of anterior/posterior intervertebral distance (A/P ratio), and lordotic angles of intervertebral bodies (L2~L5) were measured by radiography. Results: Mean intervertebral distances were greater during LCCT than those measured prior to applying traction (p < 0.05). Mean A/P ratio was also significantly greater during LCCT than during ST or initially (p < 0.05). In particular, for the L4/5 intervertebral segment, which is responsible for most of the lordotic curve, mean LCCT angle was similar to mean lordotic angle in the standing position (10.9°). Conclusions: Based on measurements of radiologic geometrical changes with real-time clinical setting, the newly developed LCCT appears to be a useful traction device for increasing intervertebral disc spaces by maintaining lordotic curves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
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Open AccessArticle
Examining the Relationship between Cellphone Use Behavior, Perceived Exercise Benefit and Physical Exercise Level among University Students in Taiwan
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 556; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040556 - 11 Dec 2020
Viewed by 446
Abstract
This study investigated how perceived exercise benefit affects the relationship between cellphone usage and physical activity level. This cross-sectional study performed a survey of Taiwanese university students selected using cluster sampling. A total of 975 students were recruited (male = 367, female = [...] Read more.
This study investigated how perceived exercise benefit affects the relationship between cellphone usage and physical activity level. This cross-sectional study performed a survey of Taiwanese university students selected using cluster sampling. A total of 975 students were recruited (male = 367, female = 608, average age = 20.10 ± 1.42). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis, and hierarchical regression. The results show that cellphone usage was negatively correlated with physical activity level, whereas perceived exercise benefit was negatively correlated with cellphone usage and positively correlated with physical activity level. In hierarchical regression, the main effects of cellphone usage and perceived exercise benefit explained 22% of the variance in physical activity level. After controlling for the main effect, the interaction term accounted for an additional 1% of the variance. Cellphone usage and perceived exercise benefit thus had significant power to explain physical activity level. The results of this study reveal a novel phenomenon—that students who perceived the benefits of exercise to be greater are more physically active. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
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Open AccessArticle
A Methodological Quality Assessment of Meta-Analysis Studies in Dance Therapy Using AMSTAR and AMSTAR 2
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040446 - 01 Nov 2020
Viewed by 501
Abstract
Although earlier meta-analysis studies have provided evidence-based information useful for decision-making, debate regarding their quality continues. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of meta-analysis studies in the field of dance therapy (DT) using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) and AMSTAR [...] Read more.
Although earlier meta-analysis studies have provided evidence-based information useful for decision-making, debate regarding their quality continues. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of meta-analysis studies in the field of dance therapy (DT) using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) and AMSTAR 2 assessment tools. Meta-analysis studies on DT were collected from various databases. Seven meta-analysis studies were selected for this study. Our findings showed that the quality level of the meta-analysis studies related to DT was “High” on the AMSTAR evaluation, but their quality decreased to “Low” on the AMSTAR 2 evaluation. Moreover, using AMSTAR 2, 71.43% of the studies fell within the category of “Moderate” or below. There was no statistically significant difference in the quality scores of the characteristics of these studies. Our results suggest that (1) education on meta-analysis guidelines is required to improve the quality of DT-related meta-analysis studies, and (2) methodological caution is warranted, since different outcomes in evaluation scores for each tool may be obtained when using AMSTAR and AMSTAR 2. Based on this study, it is expected that common and specific guidelines for meta-analysis in DT can be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
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Open AccessArticle
Electroacupuncture and Manual Acupuncture Increase Joint Flexibility but Reduce Muscle Strength
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040414 - 20 Oct 2020
Viewed by 455
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on hip flexion range of motion (ROM), knee joint (flexion replication at 15° and 45°) and quadriceps (strength and activation) function. Forty-five neurologically healthy adults participated in [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on hip flexion range of motion (ROM), knee joint (flexion replication at 15° and 45°) and quadriceps (strength and activation) function. Forty-five neurologically healthy adults participated in this randomized controlled laboratory study. Straight leg raise test, modified Thomas test, and hip abductors strength test were performed to determine acupoints. Afterwards, one of three 15-min treatments (control—no treatment, electroacupuncture, or manual acupuncture) was randomly applied using determined acupoints. Measurements (hip flexion ROM, and knee joint and quadriceps function) were recorded at baseline, and at 0, 20, and 40 min post treatment. Both electroacupuncture (4.0°, ES = 0.41) and manual acupuncture (5.4°, ES = 0.95) treatment immediately increased hip flexion ROM, and the increased values persisted for 40-min (p = 0.01). Knee flexion replication (at 15°: p = 0.17; 45°: p = 0.19) and quadriceps activation (p = 0.71) did not change at any of the time points. Post-treatment, both electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture decreased quadriceps strength at 0-min (electroacupuncture: 9.2%, p < 0.0001, ES = 0.60) and 40-min (electroacupuncture: 7.3%, p = 0.005, ES = 0.55; manual acupuncture: 8.7%, p = 0.01, ES = 0.54). A single session of either electroacupuncture or manual acupuncture treatment (selected acupoints based on physical examination) may immediately improve joint flexibility but reduce muscle strength. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
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Open AccessArticle
Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Romanian Marx Activity Rating Scale for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 318; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030318 - 04 Sep 2020
Viewed by 666
Abstract
Aim: We aimed to translate, cross-cultural adapt and validate the Marx activity rating scale (MARS) of the knee for Romanian patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Method: The original English form was translated according to guidelines. We included patients with ACL injury [...] Read more.
Aim: We aimed to translate, cross-cultural adapt and validate the Marx activity rating scale (MARS) of the knee for Romanian patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Method: The original English form was translated according to guidelines. We included patients with ACL injury undergoing reconstruction in two centers over 3 years. Subjects completed the translated MARS, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee form and EuroQol EQ5D. The examining physician completed the Tegner Lysholm scale as an objective evaluation. Re-testing was obtained after one month. We used Spearman`s correlation to evaluate construct validity and reproducibility, Cronbach’s alpha for internal consistency and intraclass correlation for test-retest reliability. Results: We collected valid forms from 99 patients (32.1 ± 8.8 years, 64.6% males) during the preoperative evaluation and 45 were re-tested. Significant, very good correlations were found between the MARS and Tegner Lysholm (Spearman’s r = 0.712, p < 0.0001) and IKDC (Spearman’s r = 0.801, p < 0.0001). Cronbach’s alpha was 0.893 at the initial completion and 0.799 at re-test. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.895. Conclusions: The Romanian-translated MARS is a valid, consistent and reliable physical activity outcome measure in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
Open AccessArticle
Immediate Effect of Balance Taping Using Kinesiology Tape on Dynamic and Static Balance after Ankle Muscle Fatigue
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020162 - 09 Jun 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1088
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate whether ankle balance taping (ABT) applied after muscle fatigue-inducing exercise can cause immediate improvements in dynamic and static balance. A total of 31 adults (16 males and 15 females) met the inclusion criteria. The experiment [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to investigate whether ankle balance taping (ABT) applied after muscle fatigue-inducing exercise can cause immediate improvements in dynamic and static balance. A total of 31 adults (16 males and 15 females) met the inclusion criteria. The experiment was designed using a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Changes in static and dynamic balance were measured before and after inducing muscle fatigue in the ankles and after ABT or ankle placebo taping (APT). After ankle muscle fatigue-inducing exercise, both the ABT and APT groups showed significant increases in surface area ellipses in the static state with eyes open (p < 0.05), and significant increases in surface area ellipses in the static and dynamic states with eyes closed (both p < 0.05). After taping of the fatigued ankle, surface area ellipses decreased significantly when eyes were open and closed in the static and dynamic states, but only in the ABT group (p < 0.05). Static balance was significantly different between groups (eyes open, 36.2 ± 86; eyes closed, 22.9 ± 46.7). Dynamic balance was significantly different between groups (eyes open, 68.6 ± 152.1; eyes closed, 235.8 ± 317.6). ABT may help prevent ankle injuries in individuals who experience muscle fatigue around the ankles after sports and daily activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Exercise-Induced Myokines can Explain the Importance of Physical Activity in the Elderly: An Overview
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 378; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040378 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1207
Abstract
Physical activity has been found to aid the maintenance of health in the elderly. Exercise-induced skeletal muscle contractions lead to the production and secretion of many small proteins and proteoglycan peptides called myokines. Thus, studies on myokines are necessary for ensuring the maintenance [...] Read more.
Physical activity has been found to aid the maintenance of health in the elderly. Exercise-induced skeletal muscle contractions lead to the production and secretion of many small proteins and proteoglycan peptides called myokines. Thus, studies on myokines are necessary for ensuring the maintenance of skeletal muscle health in the elderly. This review summarizes 13 myokines regulated by physical activity that are affected by aging and aims to understand their potential roles in metabolic diseases. We categorized myokines into two groups based on regulation by aerobic and anaerobic exercise. With aging, the secretion of apelin, β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA), bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7), decorin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), interleukin-15 (IL-15), irisin, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), sestrin, secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) decreased, while that of IL-6 and myostatin increased. Aerobic exercise upregulates apelin, BAIBA, IL-15, IL-6, irisin, SDF-1, sestrin, SPARC, and VEGF-A expression, while anaerobic exercise upregulates BMP-7, decorin, IGF-1, IL-15, IL-6, irisin, and VEGF-A expression. Myostatin is downregulated by both aerobic and anaerobic exercise. This review provides a rationale for developing exercise programs or interventions that maintain a balance between aerobic and anaerobic exercise in the elderly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)

Other

Open AccessCase Report
Short-Term Effect of Ankle Eversion Taping on Bilateral Acute Ankle Inversion Sprains in an Amateur College Football Goalkeeper: A Case Report
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040403 - 15 Oct 2020
Viewed by 476
Abstract
This case study aimed to investigate the short-term effects of ankle eversion taping (AET) using kinesiology tape on bilateral acute ankle inversion sprains in an amateur college soccer goalkeeper. Ankle eversion taping was applied for two weeks (average 16 h/day) on a 24-year-old [...] Read more.
This case study aimed to investigate the short-term effects of ankle eversion taping (AET) using kinesiology tape on bilateral acute ankle inversion sprains in an amateur college soccer goalkeeper. Ankle eversion taping was applied for two weeks (average 16 h/day) on a 24-year-old goalkeeper with bilateral grade 2 acute ankle inversion sprain with swelling (left ankle more severe) during a soccer match. The subject had a foot ankle outcome score (FAOS) of 41%; visual analog scale (VAS) scores of 5/10 and 7/10 for the right and left ankles, respectively; patient-specific functional and pain scale (PSFS) score of 12/50; and limited range of motion of the ankle. The swelling disappeared after AET in both ankles. In the weight-bearing lunge test, the right and left ankle distances increased from 2 cm to 12 cm, and from 0 cm to 12 cm, respectively. The FAOS improved from 20% to 97%, while the PSFS score improved from 12/50 to 50/50. The VAS scores decreased to 0/10 for both ankles. AET is a potential clinical treatment method for acute ankle inversion sprain with swelling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Rehabilitation & Prevention in Sports Injuries)
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