Special Issue "Mental Health in Times of Pandemic: Protective and Risk Factors"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Coronaviruses (CoV) and COVID-19 Pandemic".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fabrizia Giannotta
Website
Guest Editor
Mälardarens University, Vasteras, Sweden
Interests: mental health; alcohol and substance use; preventive interventions
Dr. Yunhwan Kim
Website
Guest Editor
Lund University, Sweden
Interests: mental health; resilience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is having serious consequences for the health of individuals. Worldwide, millions of people have died, and the number of victims is expected to increase. Other than these terrible immediate effects, the pandemic is likely to have some equally worrying long-term effects. According to WHO, one of these effects will definitely concern the mental health of individuals. The pandemic has brought about numerous changes in life which are likely to have substantive implications on mental health, such as: social distancing, the restrictions to individual freedom, the fear of a still relatively unknown virus, the economic crisis due to the pandemic, and the loss of loved ones are factors likely to differently affect the mental health of all individuals. In addition, as some studies have already started to show, the effects of the pandemic on people, including on their mental health, may be different depending on various factors (i.e., age, SES, and social support, to name a few).

In this Special Issue, we aim to fill the research gap regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health. Therefore, we welcome articles, reviews, and commentaries that will shed a light on:

- The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of individuals in different sociodemographic groups (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, immigration status, SES);

- The identification of risk and protective factors that put individuals at more vs. less at risk for mental health problems during the pandemic period;

- Effective intervention strategies to prevent the negative psychological effects of the pandemic for all or for different sociodemographic groups.

Quantitative, qualitative, case-studies, or mixed-methods studies are welcomed.

Dr. Fabrizia Giannotta
Dr. Yunhwan Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mental health
  • COVID-19
  • Children
  • Adults
  • Older Adults
  • Socioeconomic differences
  • Risk-factors
  • Protective factors
  • Preventive interventions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Panic and Trust during COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study on Immigrants in South Korea
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020199 - 12 Feb 2021
Viewed by 229
Abstract
In the COVID-19 pandemic, marginalized groups like migrants are disproportionately affected. As panic, fear of neglect, and mistrusting institutions in these groups are presumed to be apparent, their detachment to health services still needs to be investigated. This study comparatively analyzed the level [...] Read more.
In the COVID-19 pandemic, marginalized groups like migrants are disproportionately affected. As panic, fear of neglect, and mistrusting institutions in these groups are presumed to be apparent, their detachment to health services still needs to be investigated. This study comparatively analyzed the level of panic and trust between South Koreans and immigrants who are living within highly affected areas of South Korea. Mann–Whitney-U-Test and Pearson correlation showed panic is more pronounced in the Korean group while having a similar panic display pattern with the immigrants. The immigrant group appears to highly trust the Korean health system, health institutions, local media, and the local native community. Beyond conventional expectations, participant’s average panic score showed a statistically significant positive correlation with items of the trust scale, indicating a level of individual reliance amid the pandemic panic. Thus, ascertaining institutional trust and matured citizenry are identified as factors for effective public health outcomes. During such a pandemic, this study also reminded the public health needs of immigrants as secondary citizens, and presumptions of immigrants’ mistrust in such settings might not always be true. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health in Times of Pandemic: Protective and Risk Factors)
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Open AccessArticle
Severe Mental Health Symptoms during COVID-19: A Comparison of the United Kingdom and Austria
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020191 - 09 Feb 2021
Viewed by 297
Abstract
This study evaluated severe psychological symptoms in the United Kingdom and Austria after four weeks of lockdown due to COVID-19. Two cross-sectional online surveys were performed with representative population samples according to age, gender, region, and education. Depressive symptoms were measured with the [...] Read more.
This study evaluated severe psychological symptoms in the United Kingdom and Austria after four weeks of lockdown due to COVID-19. Two cross-sectional online surveys were performed with representative population samples according to age, gender, region, and education. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), anxiety symptoms with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7), and insomnia symptoms with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). The sample size was N = 1005 for Austria (52% women) and N = 1006 (54% women) for the UK. In total, 3.2% of the Austrian sample and 12.1% of the UK sample had severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 20 points; χ2(1) = 57.24; p < 0.001), 6.0% in Austria vs. 18.9% in the UK had severe anxiety symptoms (GAD-7 ≥ 15 points; χ2(1) = 76.17; p < 0.001), and 2.2% in Austria and 7.3% in the UK had severe insomnia (ISI; ≥22 points; χ2(1) = 28.89; p < 0.001). The prevalence of severe depressive, anxiety or insomnia symptoms was around three times higher in the UK than in Austria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health in Times of Pandemic: Protective and Risk Factors)
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