Next Article in Journal
Diagnostic Performance of a Deep Learning Model Deployed at a National COVID-19 Screening Facility for Detection of Pneumonia on Frontal Chest Radiographs
Next Article in Special Issue
Post-Traumatic Growth during COVID-19: The Role of Perceived Social Support, Personality, and Coping Strategies
Previous Article in Journal
Correlations between Diabetes Mellitus Self-Care Activities and Glycaemic Control in the Adult Population: A Cross-Sectional Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Risk Factors for Relapse in People with Severe Mental Disorders during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Multicenter Retrospective Study
Article

The Impact of Migration Status on Adolescents’ Mental Health during COVID-19

1
Department for Psychotherapy and Biopsychosocial Health, Danube University Krems, 3500 Krems, Austria
2
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria
3
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm, 89081 Ulm, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Fabrizia Giannotta and Yunhwan Kim
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010176
Received: 3 December 2021 / Revised: 3 January 2022 / Accepted: 13 January 2022 / Published: 17 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health in Times of Pandemic: Protective and Risk Factors)
The purpose of this study was to compare mental health in adolescents with and without migration background after a semester of remote schooling and almost a year of social distancing in Austria. An online survey, supported by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research, was conducted from 3rd February to 28th February 2021 measuring well-being (WHO-5), depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), sleep quality (ISI), stress (PSS-10), and disordered eating (EAT-8). A matched-pairs analysis with and without migration background was conducted and was checked with whole sample analysis. From a total of 3052 participants, N = 508 had a migration background (first or second generation) and N = 479 could be matched according to age, gender, region, and education with adolescents without migration background. Matched-pairs analyses showed that migration background is associated with poorer mental health concerning well-being, depression, anxiety, and insomnia scores (all p-values < 0.05). Prevalence of depressive symptoms (64.5% vs. 56.5%), anxiety symptoms (53.5% vs. 46.0%), as well as insomnia (31.9% vs. 21.0%) is higher in adolescents with migration background (all p-values ≤ 0.02). Comparison of the whole sample (N = 3052) confirmed these results. Results suggest that migration status is a risk factor for mental health problems among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic and highlight the need to implement easily accessible culture- and language-specific health promotion and prevention strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: migration status; adolescents; mental health; COVID-19; depression; anxiety migration status; adolescents; mental health; COVID-19; depression; anxiety
MDPI and ACS Style

Pieh, C.; Dale, R.; Jesser, A.; Probst, T.; Plener, P.L.; Humer, E. The Impact of Migration Status on Adolescents’ Mental Health during COVID-19. Healthcare 2022, 10, 176. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010176

AMA Style

Pieh C, Dale R, Jesser A, Probst T, Plener PL, Humer E. The Impact of Migration Status on Adolescents’ Mental Health during COVID-19. Healthcare. 2022; 10(1):176. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010176

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pieh, Christoph, Rachel Dale, Andrea Jesser, Thomas Probst, Paul L. Plener, and Elke Humer. 2022. "The Impact of Migration Status on Adolescents’ Mental Health during COVID-19" Healthcare 10, no. 1: 176. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010176

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop