Special Issue "Mobile Health Care with Smart Technology Applications"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "TeleHealth and Digital Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Katsuhiro Honda
Website
Guest Editor
Human Information System Lab., Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuencho 1-1, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka, 599-8531, Japan
Prof. Dr. Tin-Chih Toly Chen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, National Chiao Tung University, 1001, University Road, Hsinchu City, Taiwan
Interests: fuzzy and neural computing; competitiveness analysis; cloud and ubiquitous manufacturing; operations research; semiconductor manufacturing; ambient intelligence; mobile health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Min-Chi Chiu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, National Chin Yi University of Technology, Taichung 41170, Taiwan
Interests: Occupational biomechanics; Human computer interaction; Motion analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Smart technologies have been widely applied to mobile health care. Some major trends are summarized as follows. Mobile recommendation systems (or apps) recommend patients to the most suitable clinics or health care facilities by considering their preferences. Smart watches have full mobile phone capability and are equipped with sensors such as thermometers and heart rate monitors. The sensors monitor and help to maintain users’ physical conditions that can be conveyed to the backend server for further diagnosis. In a smart hospital, wireless sensors are attached to patients on the move to collect real-time information, such as their pulses and oxygen saturation readings. For a similar purpose, smart clothes are increasingly popular for monitoring health care conditions due to the miniaturization of sensors. An advance in hardware is three-dimensional printers that can be applied to print a patient’s implants and organs wherever they go. To assist in such operations, the medical record of a patient can be put on a cloud to be accessed from anywhere. Some smart technologies can even overcome the limitations of existing technologies. For example, smart glasses use video cameras and light-emitting diode arrays to assist people with extremely bad vision. Obviously, the applications of smart technologies have enhanced mobile health care.

For the aforementioned reasons, this Special Issue is intended to provide the technical details of smart technologies for enhancing mobile health care. These details will hold great interest for researchers in health care, smart technology, quality technology, quantitative management, ambient intelligence, mobile commerce, operations research, system science, and information management, as well as for practicing managers and engineers. This Special Issue features a balance between state-of-the-art research and practical applications and also provides a forum for researchers and practitioners to review and disseminate quality research work on smart technologies for enhancing mobile health care and the critical issues for further development.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Smart technologies for mobile health care service recommendation
  • Smart technologies for better awareness when searching for health care services
  • Smart technologies for better efficiency when accessing a health care service
  • Smart technologies for finding more suitable health care services
  • Assessing the quality of a mobile health care system (or service): User-responded outcomes/interviewing/questionnaire survey; structural equation modeling; biometry/biostatistics; Kano model; soft computing
  • Smart technologies for improving the quality of a mobile health care service
  • Smart technologies for load balancing among mobile health care services
  • Smart technologies for increasing the preparedness of a mobile health care service
  • Smart clinics and hospitals
  • Smart service networks for mobile health care
  • Wirelessly connected smart systems for mobile heath care
  • Interactive smart systems for mobile health care
  • Predictive smart systems for mobile health care
  • Cost-effectiveness analysis of a smart technology application to mobile health care
  • Optimization issues in a smart technology application to mobile health care
  • Other related topics

Prof. Dr. Katsuhiro Honda
Prof. Dr. Tin-Chih Chen
Prof. Dr. Min-Chi Chiu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Telehealth Use among Community Health Centers and Cardio-Metabolic Health Outcomes
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020165 - 10 Jun 2020
Viewed by 1319
Abstract
Public health interventions to manage the cardio-metabolic syndrome (CMS) have had modest success, necessitating the expansion of telehealth services to where people live. This effort analyzes the association between telehealth provision and the management of CMS-related quality measures (hypertension, diabetes, weight assessment and [...] Read more.
Public health interventions to manage the cardio-metabolic syndrome (CMS) have had modest success, necessitating the expansion of telehealth services to where people live. This effort analyzes the association between telehealth provision and the management of CMS-related quality measures (hypertension, diabetes, weight assessment and related counseling, lipid therapy for coronary artery disease, and antiplatelet therapy for ischemic vascular disease) using the Uniform Data System administrative database during the period 2016–2018. A total of 523, 600, and 586 community health centers (CHCs) were documented using telehealth, out of the 1367, 1373, and 1362 total CHCs, in the respective three years. Our primary analysis showed that there was no association between telehealth use and the outcomes. A difference in difference approach that compared the CHCs which transitioned from not using it to using it with those that did not use telehealth in two consecutive years also produced null results. However, among rural areas, the odds of better managing the outcomes were greater for certain outcomes. Our study provides limited support that the adoption of telehealth is potentially beneficial in improving certain outcomes in the CHCs setting that are based in rural areas. More specificity in data regarding the nature of telehealth implementation in the CHC setting could bring clarity in these associations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health Care with Smart Technology Applications)
Open AccessArticle
An Extended Method for Saccadic Eye Movement Measurements Using a Head-Mounted Display
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020104 - 21 Apr 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1222
Abstract
Saccadic eye movement is an important ability in our daily life and is especially important in driving and sports. Traditionally, the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM) test and the King–Devick (K-D) test have been used to measure saccadic eye movement, but these only involve [...] Read more.
Saccadic eye movement is an important ability in our daily life and is especially important in driving and sports. Traditionally, the Developmental Eye Movement (DEM) test and the King–Devick (K-D) test have been used to measure saccadic eye movement, but these only involve measurements with “adjusted time”. Therefore, a different approach is required to obtain the eye movement speed and reaction rate in detail, as some are rapid eye movements, while others are slow actions, and vice versa. This study proposed an extended method that can acquire the “rest time” and “transfer time”, as well as the “adjusted time”, by implementing a virtual reality-based DEM test, using a FOVE virtual reality (VR) head-mounted display (HMD), equipped with an eye-tracking module. This approach was tested in 30 subjects with normal vision and no ophthalmologic disease by using a 2-diopter (50-cm) distance. This allowed for measurements of the “adjusted time” and the “rest time” for focusing on each target number character, the “transfer time” for moving to the next target number character, and recording of the gaze-tracking log. The results of this experiment showed that it was possible to analyze more parameters of the saccadic eye movement with the proposed method than with the traditional methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health Care with Smart Technology Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Cognitive Intervention with Musical Stimuli Using Digital Devices on Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Pilot Study
Healthcare 2020, 8(1), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8010045 - 25 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1517
Abstract
The effect of music therapy on cognitive function has been widely reported; however, its clinical implications remain controversial. Performing therapeutic musical activities in groups using individualized instruments can help overcome the issues of engagement and compliance. We aimed to evaluate the effect of [...] Read more.
The effect of music therapy on cognitive function has been widely reported; however, its clinical implications remain controversial. Performing therapeutic musical activities in groups using individualized instruments can help overcome the issues of engagement and compliance. We aimed to evaluate the effect of a cognitive intervention with musical stimuli using digital devices on mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this prospective study, 24 patients with MCI (intervention group, 12; and control group, 12) were enrolled. We developed an electronic device with musical instruments and the Song-based Cognitive Stimulation Therapy protocol (SongCST). Patients in the intervention group underwent a 10-week cognitive intervention involving musical stimuli generated by our device. Effect of the intervention on cognitive function was evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination-Dementia Screening (MMSE-DS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment-Korean (MOCA-K), and Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB). In the intervention group, MMSE-DS and MOCA-K scores improved significantly after the 10-week intervention. The changes in MOCA-K and CDR-SB scores were significantly different between the intervention and control groups. Our study showed that music therapy with digital devices has a positive effect on the executive function and overall disease severity in patients with MCI. Our study can facilitate individualization of music therapy using digital devices in groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health Care with Smart Technology Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Design and Development of a Wearable Exoskeleton System for Stroke Rehabilitation
Healthcare 2020, 8(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8010018 - 15 Jan 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1875
Abstract
For more than a decade, many countries have been actively developing robotic assistive devices to assist in the rehabilitation of individuals with limb disability to regain function in the extremities. The exoskeleton assistive device in this study has been designed primarily for hemiplegic [...] Read more.
For more than a decade, many countries have been actively developing robotic assistive devices to assist in the rehabilitation of individuals with limb disability to regain function in the extremities. The exoskeleton assistive device in this study has been designed primarily for hemiplegic stroke patients to aid in the extension of fingers to open up the palm to simulate the effects of rehabilitation. This exoskeleton was designed as an anterior-support type to achieve palmar extension and acts as a robotic assistive device for rehabilitation in bilateral upper limb task training. Testing results show that this wearable exoskeleton assistive device with human factor consideration using percentile dimensions can provide comfortable wear on patients as well as adequate torque to pull individual fingers into flexion towards the palm for rehabilitation. We hope this exoskeleton device can help stroke patients with loss of function in the upper extremities to resume motor activities in order to maintain activities of daily living. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health Care with Smart Technology Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Robot Helps When Robot Fits: Examining the Role of Baby Robots in Fertility Promotion
Healthcare 2019, 7(4), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7040147 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1489
Abstract
Considering China is facing a precipitous decline in its population, there is an emerging trend of developing baby robots to encourage people’s willingness to become “parents”. Based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior and the theory of uncanny valley, this study empirically [...] Read more.
Considering China is facing a precipitous decline in its population, there is an emerging trend of developing baby robots to encourage people’s willingness to become “parents”. Based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior and the theory of uncanny valley, this study empirically investigated whether a baby robot could perform as a prominent antecedent of fertility intention in China, and how this relates to its visual appearance. Consistent with prior research, the current study used a between-subjects design to show (1) a baby robot could significantly improve people’s fertility attitude through temporal visual stimulation; (2) fertility attitude, subjective norms from peers, and perceived behavioral control of finance could significantly contribute to fertility intention. Theoretical contributions and implications are discussed in this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health Care with Smart Technology Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
A Collaborative and Ubiquitous System for Fabricating Dental Parts Using 3D Printing Technologies
Healthcare 2019, 7(3), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7030103 - 06 Sep 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1521
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) printing has great potential for establishing a ubiquitous service in the medical industry. However, the planning, optimization, and control of a ubiquitous 3D printing network have not been sufficiently discussed. Therefore, this study established a collaborative and ubiquitous system for making [...] Read more.
Three-dimensional (3D) printing has great potential for establishing a ubiquitous service in the medical industry. However, the planning, optimization, and control of a ubiquitous 3D printing network have not been sufficiently discussed. Therefore, this study established a collaborative and ubiquitous system for making dental parts using 3D printing. The collaborative and ubiquitous system split an order for the 3D printing facilities to fulfill the order collaboratively and forms a delivery plan to pick up the 3D objects. To optimize the performance of the two tasks, a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model and a mixed-integer quadratic programming (MIQP) model are proposed, respectively. In addition, slack information is derived and provided to each 3D printing facility so that it can determine the feasibility of resuming the same 3D printing process locally from the beginning without violating the optimality of the original printing and delivery plan. Further, more slack is gained by considering the chain effect between two successive 3D printing facilities. The effectiveness of the collaborative and ubiquitous system was validated using a regional experiment in Taichung City, Taiwan. Compared with two existing methods, the collaborative and ubiquitous 3D printing network reduced the manufacturing lead time by 45% on average. Furthermore, with the slack information, a 3D printing facility could make an independent decision about the feasibility of resuming the same 3D printing process locally from the beginning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health Care with Smart Technology Applications)
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