Epidemiology, Prevention and Treatment of Cervical Carcinoma in the HPV Era

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Women's Health Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 8986

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Woman, Child and General and Specialized Surgery, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 81100 Caserta, CE, Italy
Interests: gynecological oncology; gynecological surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The discovery of the oncogenicity of the human papilloma virus has allowed the scientific community to take huge strides forward in managing cervical cancer. Deepening this knowledge has improved our ability to screen and treat this disease. Furthermore, it has provided a unique weapon: primary prevention of an oncological disease through vaccination. Such scientific evidence impacts both individual case management and “public health” issues, with varying applications around the world for screening protocols and vaccination campaigns. This heterogeneity has increased the dyscrasia between developed and developing countries, decreasing the incidence and mortality of the disease on the one hand and, on the other, worsening them. This Special Issue was created to bring the scientific community together to exchange the latest findings on this topic. Indeed, there are still numerous "gray areas" regarding these diseases. These range from the role of vaginal microbiota in oncogenesis to the appropriateness of treatment of dysplasias to the standardization of surgical treatment in overt cases of cancer. We thus call for original articles, reviews and case series, and case reports sharing knowledge and insight on the topic in various fields of application, ranging from virus genetics to diagnostic testing and from primary prevention to adjuvant treatment.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Carlo Ronsini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • HPV
  • cervical cancer
  • screening
  • cervical dysplasia

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

10 pages, 841 KiB  
Article
An Epidemiological Study of Cervical Cancer Trends among Women with Human Immunodeficiency Virus
by Arlesia Mathis, Ukamaka D. Smith, Vanessa Crowther, Torhonda Lee and Sandra Suther
Healthcare 2024, 12(12), 1178; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12121178 - 11 Jun 2024
Viewed by 347
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine cervical cancer among women with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and to discuss targeted strategies to reduce the risk of developing cervical cancer. This study used retrospective data from surveillance reports collected between January 2001 and [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to examine cervical cancer among women with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and to discuss targeted strategies to reduce the risk of developing cervical cancer. This study used retrospective data from surveillance reports collected between January 2001 and December 2012. Women with HIV/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) were linked through a crosswalk file to Florida’s cancer registry database to determine which women developed cervical cancer during this period. We examined the cervical cancer trends using age-adjusted cervical cancer rates to examine the changes over time; the geographic variations in cervical cancer and HIV across service areas using a Geographic Information System (GIS); and finally, the cervical cancer rates among women with HIV compared with the cervical cancer rates in the general population. The results show that, over time, the cervical cancer rates in women with HIV/AIDS decreased; however, we detected increases in the cervical cancer rates among women in the general population. The findings of this study show that more work is required to address cervical cancer. This growing burden of cervical cancer implies that targeted interventions are imperative to improving the health status of women with cervical cancer. If properly addressed, the potential to reduce and prevent cervical cancer is achievable. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 261 KiB  
Article
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Cervical Cancer Prevention and Screening among Female Pharmacy Students at a Public University in a Southern Region of Saudi Arabia
by Vigneshwaran Easwaran, Eman Mohammed Shorog, Almaha Ali Alshahrani, Asif Ansari Shaik Mohammad, Mantargi Mohammad Jaffar Sadiq, Sirajudeen Shaik Alavudeen, Noohu Abdulla Khan, Md Sayeed Akhtar, Tahani Musleh Almeleebia and Sultan Mohammed Alshahrani
Healthcare 2023, 11(20), 2798; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11202798 - 22 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1310
Abstract
Despite the availability of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and screening facilities at various health centers in Saudi Arabia, the annual death rate due to cervical cancer is high. Therefore, knowledge and awareness are essential for self-care and educating others, particularly among healthcare students. [...] Read more.
Despite the availability of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and screening facilities at various health centers in Saudi Arabia, the annual death rate due to cervical cancer is high. Therefore, knowledge and awareness are essential for self-care and educating others, particularly among healthcare students. The present descriptive, cross-sectional study explored female pharmacy students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to cervical cancer. A total of 140 students participated in the survey. The survey was conducted for the period between April 2022 to September 2023. We observed a good knowledge score and positive attitudes among 8.5% and 93.5% of participants, respectively. A total of 10% of the study participants reported good practice scores. Most participants had never been screened for cervical cancer (94.3%). Among the non-screened subjects, feeling healthy and lacking information were the participants’ significant reasons for not screening for cervical cancer. A positive history of cancer related to smoking significantly impacted the knowledge score (p = 0.050). The current study reveals that healthcare awareness programs for cervical cancer and HPV vaccination are necessary at the level of educational institutions to improve public health. Full article
10 pages, 3483 KiB  
Article
Cancer of the Cervix in Bulgaria: Epidemiology of a Crisis
by Angel Yordanov, Mariela Vasileva-Slaveva, Noya Galai, David Faraggi, Milan Paul Kubelac, Irina Tripac-Iacovleva, Neville Calleja, Riccardo Di Fiore and Jean Calleja-Agius
Healthcare 2023, 11(3), 318; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11030318 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2255
Abstract
Eastern Europe continues to have the highest rates of cancer of the uterine cervix (CUC) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Europe. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate CUC trends in Bulgaria in the context of a lack of a [...] Read more.
Eastern Europe continues to have the highest rates of cancer of the uterine cervix (CUC) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Europe. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate CUC trends in Bulgaria in the context of a lack of a population-based screening program and a demographic crisis. Methodology: This was a retrospective study of 7861 CUC patients who were registered in the Bulgarian National Cancer Registry (BNCR) between 2013 and 2020 and followed up with until March 2022. We used descriptive statistics and modeling to assess temporal trends in new CUC incidence rates and identify factors associated with survival. Results: Bulgaria’s population has decreased by 11.5% between 2011 and 2021. The CUC incidence rate decreased from 29.5/100,000 in 2013 to 23.2/100,000 in 2020 but remains very high. The proportion of patients diagnosed in earlier stages of CUC has decreased over time. Up to 19% of patients with CUC in Bulgaria are diagnosed between the age of 35 and 44 years. The median survival was 101.5 months, with some improvement in later years (adjusted HR = 0.83 for 2017–2020). Conclusions: In countries with well-established population-based screening, CUC is nowadays considered a rare disease. However, it is not considered rare in Bulgaria. Population-based screening starting at an earlier age is the fastest way to improve outcomes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

25 pages, 571 KiB  
Review
HPV and Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening Practices among Migrant Women: A Narrative Review
by Nuray Yasemin Ozturk, Syeda Zakia Hossain, Martin Mackey, Shukri Adam and Patrick Brennan
Healthcare 2024, 12(7), 709; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12070709 - 23 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1243
Abstract
This narrative review explores the barriers and facilitators that migrant women face globally. The review explored a range of studies conducted in various countries, including the United States of America (USA), the United Kingdom (UK), Canada, Australia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). [...] Read more.
This narrative review explores the barriers and facilitators that migrant women face globally. The review explored a range of studies conducted in various countries, including the United States of America (USA), the United Kingdom (UK), Canada, Australia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It also specialises in the experiences of migrant women living in Sydney, Australia, and women living in Ras Al Khaimah (RAK), UAE. Cervical cancer ranks as the fourth most prevalent form of cancer among women worldwide. It is the fourteenth most common cancer among women in Australia and the fourth most common cancer in the UAE. Despite the availability of vaccinations and cervical screening initiatives in many countries, including the USA, the UK, Canada, Australia, and the UAE, migrant women living in these countries continue to experience considerable health gaps when accessing cervical cancer screening services. Addressing these disparities is crucial to ensuring everyone has equal healthcare access. An electronic search was conducted using three databases to identify articles published between 2011 and 2021. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods research studies were included in the search. The identified factors were classified into categories of barriers and facilitators of cervical screening uptake, which were then sub-categorized. This narrative review examines the awareness of cervical cancer and screening behaviours, attitudes, barriers, and facilitators associated with cervical cancer screening. According to the study, several factors pose significant obstacles for migrant women worldwide, particularly those living in the USA, the UK, Canada, and Sydney, Australia, and Emirati and non-Emirati women (migrant women) residing in RAK when it comes to undergoing cervical cancer screening. These barriers include inadequate knowledge and emotional, cultural, religious, psychological, and organisational factors. On the other hand, social support, awareness campaigns, and the availability of screening services were found to promote the uptake of cervical cancer screening. The findings from this review suggest that healthcare providers should adopt culturally sensitive approaches to enhance awareness and encourage participation in screening programs among migrant women. Based on the findings of this narrative review, it is strongly suggested that healthcare providers and policymakers prioritise developing culturally sensitive screening initiatives for migrant women. It is essential to address the psychological and emotional barriers that prevent migrant women from accessing screening services. This can be accomplished by offering education and awareness campaigns in their native languages and implementing a community-based approach to encourage social support and increase awareness of cervical cancer and screening services. Furthermore, healthcare providers and organisations should provide educational tools that address common misconceptions based on cultural and religious factors that prevent women from accessing screening services. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 534 KiB  
Review
Surgical Treatment for Early Cervical Cancer in the HPV Era: State of the Art
by Mario Palumbo, Luigi Della Corte, Carlo Ronsini, Serena Guerra, Pierluigi Giampaolino and Giuseppe Bifulco
Healthcare 2023, 11(22), 2942; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11222942 - 10 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1073
Abstract
Cervical cancer (CC) is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. The aim of this study is to focus on the state of the art of CC prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment and, within the latter, the role of surgery in the [...] Read more.
Cervical cancer (CC) is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. The aim of this study is to focus on the state of the art of CC prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment and, within the latter, the role of surgery in the various stages of the disease with a focus on the impact of the LACC study (Laparoscopic Approach to Cervical Cancer trial) on the scientific debate and clinical practice. We have discussed the controversial application of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for tumors < 2 cm and the possibility of fertility-sparing surgery on young women desirous of pregnancy. This analysis provides support for surgeons in the choice of better management, including patients with a desire for offspring and the need for sentinel node biopsy (SNB) rather than pelvic lymphadenectomy for tumors < 4 cm, and without suspicious lymph nodes’ involvement on imaging. Vaccines and early diagnosis of pre-cancerous lesions are the most effective public health tool to tackle cervical cancer worldwide. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 310 KiB  
Review
Cervical Cancer Screening Recommendations: Now and for the Future
by Marissa Rayner, Annalyn Welp, Mark H. Stoler and Leigh A. Cantrell
Healthcare 2023, 11(16), 2273; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11162273 - 11 Aug 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1970
Abstract
Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide, with over 600,000 new cases annually and approximately 350,000 cancer-related deaths per year. The disease burden is disproportionately distributed, with cancer-related mortality ranging from 5.2 deaths per 100,000 individuals in highly-developed countries, to 12.4 [...] Read more.
Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide, with over 600,000 new cases annually and approximately 350,000 cancer-related deaths per year. The disease burden is disproportionately distributed, with cancer-related mortality ranging from 5.2 deaths per 100,000 individuals in highly-developed countries, to 12.4 deaths per 100,000 in less-developed countries. This article is a review of the current screening recommendations and potential future recommendations. Full article
Back to TopTop