Special Issue "The First 1000 Days of Infant"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Perinatal and Neonatal Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Claude Billeaud
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre Hospitalier de, 33000 Bordeaux, France
Interests: nutrition; neonatologie; lipids; human milk; perinatal nutrition; pregnant and lactating nutrition infant nutrition; breastfeeding; public health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The first 1000 days are the most precious years for the mother–child couple. Pathology or nutrition of the pregnant and/or breastfeeding woman will condition the future nutritional, psycho-motor respiratory and nutritional development of the child. In this Special Issue, we propose the respective role of the environment and genetics in development of the breastfeeding and the role of nurses, midwives, dieticians, and lactation consultants for a harmonious and long-lasting breastfeeding. The role of human milk banks is very important for newborns and, in particular, for premature babies. It is also fundamental to have a good knowledge of the foetus, the premature baby and the full-term child from 0 to 2 years old, who are dependent on pregnant and breastfeeding women for good nutrition. The screening of neurology but also the hearing of the earliest metabolic diseases at birth and in childhood are important, to avoid the diseases of obesity in older children or even the chronic cardiometabolism diseases in adults. We will also talk about neonatal diseases, mainly in premature babies, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotic enterocolitis and infectious diseases. Finally, the well-being, breastfeeding and psychological environment of the infant can be improved by early osteopathy. Thank you to all those who will participate in my virtual conference and Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Claude Billeaud
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • pregnancy
  • foetus
  • nutrition
  • human milk
  • lipids
  • perinatal nutrition
  • breastfeeding
  • preterm and neonatal development and diseases
  • pneuologic, neurologic, infectiologic development and disease
  • well-being of mother and infant

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
The First 1000 Days: Impact of Prenatal Tobacco Smoke Exposure on Hospitalization Due to Preschool Wheezing
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 1089; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9081089 - 23 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Preschool wheezing and related hospitalization rates are increasing. Prenatal tobacco smoke exposure (PTSE) increases the risk of wheezing, yet >20% of French women smoke during pregnancy. In this observational retrospective monocentric study, we assessed the link between PTSE and hospital admissions. We included [...] Read more.
Preschool wheezing and related hospitalization rates are increasing. Prenatal tobacco smoke exposure (PTSE) increases the risk of wheezing, yet >20% of French women smoke during pregnancy. In this observational retrospective monocentric study, we assessed the link between PTSE and hospital admissions. We included infants <2 years of age admitted for acute wheezing. A phone interview with mothers was completed by electronic records. The primary endpoint was the ratio of cumulative duration of the hospitalization stays (days)/age (months). 129 children were included (36.4% exposed to PTSE vs. 63.6% unexposed). There was a significant difference in the duration of hospitalization/age: 0.9 days/month (exposed) vs. 0.58 days/month (unexposed) (p = 0.008). Smoking one cigarette/day during pregnancy was associated with an increase in hospitalization duration of 0.055 days/month (r = 0.238, p = 0.006). In the multi-variable analysis, this positive association persisted (β = 0.04, p = 0.04; standardized β = 0.27, p = 0.03). There was a trend towards a dose-effect relationship between PTSE and other important parameters associated with hospital admissions. We have demonstrated a dose-effect relationship, without a threshold effect, between PTSE and duration of hospitalization for wheezing in non-premature infants during the first 2 years of life. Prevention campaigns for future mothers should be enforced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The First 1000 Days of Infant)
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Article
Long-Term Outcome after Asphyxia and Therapeutic Hypothermia in Late Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(8), 994; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9080994 - 04 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Therapeutic hypothermia (THT) is the recommended treatment for neuroprotection in (near) term newborns that experience perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The benefit of THT in preterm newborns is unknown. This pilot study aims to investigate long-term outcomes of late preterm asphyctic infants with [...] Read more.
Therapeutic hypothermia (THT) is the recommended treatment for neuroprotection in (near) term newborns that experience perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The benefit of THT in preterm newborns is unknown. This pilot study aims to investigate long-term outcomes of late preterm asphyctic infants with and without THT compared to term infants. The single-center, retrospective analysis examined medical charts of infants with perinatal asphyxia born between 2008 and 2015. Long-term outcome was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development 2 at the age of (corrected) 24 months. Term (n = 31) and preterm (n = 8) infants with THT showed no differences regarding their long-term outcomes of psychomotor development (Psychomotor Developmental Index 101 ± 16 vs. 105 ± 11, p = 0.570), whereas preterm infants had a better mental outcome (Mental Developmental Index 105 ± 13 vs. 93 ± 18, p = 0.048). Preterm infants with and without (n = 69) THT showed a similar mental and psychomotor development (Mental Developmental Index 105 ± 13 vs. 96 ± 20, p = 0.527; Psychomotor Developmental Index 105 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 15, p = 0.927). The study highlights the importance of studying THT in asphyctic preterm infants. However, this study shows limitations and should not be used as a basis for decision-making in the clinical context. Results of a multicenter trial of THT for preterm infants (ID No.: CN-01540535) have to be awaited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The First 1000 Days of Infant)
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Article
The Effects of Conflicts and Self-Reported Insecurity on Maternal Healthcare Utilisation and Children Health Outcomes in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)
Healthcare 2021, 9(7), 842; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9070842 - 03 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Background The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has experienced political unrest, civil insecurity, and military disputes, resulting in extreme poverty and a severely impaired health care system. To reduce the morbidity and mortality in women and children by strengthening healthcare, this study aimed [...] Read more.
Background The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has experienced political unrest, civil insecurity, and military disputes, resulting in extreme poverty and a severely impaired health care system. To reduce the morbidity and mortality in women and children by strengthening healthcare, this study aimed at exploring the relationship between self-reported insecurity of mothers and maternal health-seeking behaviours and diseases in children in the DRC. Method Data collected from 8144 mothers and 14,403 children from the Multiple Indicators Cluster Survey (MICS) conducted by the National Institute of Statistics in 2017–2018, in collaboration with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), was used. The severity of the conflict in different provinces was measured using the Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP) reports. Multivariate logistic regression and stratified analysis were utilized to explore the association between conflicts with maternal health-seeking behaviours and diseases among children. Results High self-reported insecurity was positively associated with skilled antenatal care (OR1.93, 95%CI 1.50–2.49), skilled attendants at delivery (OR1.42, 95%CI 1.08–1.87), and early initiation of breastfeeding (OR1.32, 95%CI 1.04–1.68). These associations were more significant in regions with more armed conflict. It was also found that children of mothers with high self-reported insecurity were more likely to suffer from diarrhoea (OR1.47, 95%CI: 1.14–1.88), fever (OR1.23, 95%CI 1.01–1.50), cough (OR1.45, 95%CI 1.19–1.77), and dyspnea (OR2.04, 95%CI 1.52–2.73), than children of mothers with low self-reported insecurity. Conclusions Conflicts increases mothers’ insecurities and negatively affects children’s development. However, high conflict regions have to increase governmental and international assistance to promote the availability and access to maternal and child health services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The First 1000 Days of Infant)
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Review

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Review
The First Thousand Days: Kidney Health and Beyond
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1332; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101332 - 06 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The global burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is rising. A superior strategy to advance global kidney health is required to prevent and treat CKD early. Kidney development can be impacted during the first 1000 days of life by numerous factors, including malnutrition, [...] Read more.
The global burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is rising. A superior strategy to advance global kidney health is required to prevent and treat CKD early. Kidney development can be impacted during the first 1000 days of life by numerous factors, including malnutrition, maternal illness, exposure to chemicals, substance abuse, medication use, infection, and exogenous stress. In the current review, we summarize environmental risk factors reported thus far in clinical and experimental studies relating to the programming of kidney disease, and systematize the knowledge on common mechanisms underlying renal programming. The aim of this review is to discuss the primary and secondary prevention actions for enhancing kidney health from pregnancy to age 2. The final task is to address the potential interventions to target renal programming through updating animal studies. Together, we can enhance the future of global kidney health in the first 1000 days of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The First 1000 Days of Infant)
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