Special Issue "Pregnancy and Perinatal Health"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Perinatal and Neonatal Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 12030

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Claude Billeaud
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hôpital des Enfants, CHU Pellegrin, 33076 Bordeaux, France
Interests: disciplines; pediatrics; nutrition and dietetics; skills and expertise; pregnant nutrition; transfattyacids; human; milk; neonatology; neonatal medicine; prenatal diagnosis; neonatal resuscitation; infant; nutrition-materna
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Virginie Rigourd
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Neonatology Necker Enfants Malades, 75015 Paris, France
2. Milk Bank Necker Enfants Malades, 75015 Paris, France
Interests: breastfed; human milk; human milk bank; breastfeeding; COVID-19
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to announce the launch of a new Special Issue of Healthcare on “Pregnancy and Perinatal Health”. This is of course a particularly broad subject which covers all the pathologies of pregnancy that have an impact on the fetus, as well as all the diseases of the fetus and the newborn. Some examples of pathologies of pregnancy and perinatal health include:

1.  Perinatal Hematology

            Point on rhesus anemia

            Point on neonatal thrombocytopenia

            Point on leukemia and oncology in pregnant women

            Point on leukemia and oncology in neonate

            Point on neonatal hemophilia

2. Donation in Perinatology

            Donation—a philosopher's perspective

            Donation of human milk

            Cord blood donation and use

            Oocyte, embryo, and sperm donation

            Loan of uterus

3. Diseases in pregnancy that affect the newborn

            Diabetes in pregnant women and newborns

            Maternal myopathies and newborns

            Myasthenia gravis and newborn

            Maternal metabolic diseases and newborns

            COVID-19 in pregnant mothers and neonatal care

            Congenital malformations (with antenatal diagnostic)

The deadline of submission is 28 February 2022.

I look forward to receiving your abstracts on these topics; the authors of the most outstanding abstracts will be invited to give an oral presentation to the next congress of AEEP in Paris on 17–18 November 2021. Whether AEEP will be in person or virtual is yet to be determined and will be decided based on the situation around the COVID-19 pandemic at that time. Speakers must be members of AEEP/EAPE (do note that registration is EUR 60/year).

Kind Regards
Prof. Dr. Claude Billeaud
Dr. Virginie Rigourd
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pregnancy
  • fetus
  • neonatal health
  • nutrition
  • lipids
  • protein
  • human milk
  • infections: virus, bacterial, congenital malformations (with antenatal diagnostic)
  • diseases of nutrition during pregnancy and/or neonatal diseases
  • human milk
  • human milk banking
  • human milk donation
  • cord blood donation

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Research

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Article
Disability during Early Pregnancy: Using the Sheehan Disability Scale during the First Trimester in Japan
Healthcare 2022, 10(12), 2514; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10122514 - 12 Dec 2022
Viewed by 710
Abstract
Background: Many pregnant women experience impairments in social, occupational, or other important functioning. Aim: This study aimed to confirm measurement and structural invariance of the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) and its validity during early pregnancy. Design: Longitudinal study with two observations. Methods: Questionnaires [...] Read more.
Background: Many pregnant women experience impairments in social, occupational, or other important functioning. Aim: This study aimed to confirm measurement and structural invariance of the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) and its validity during early pregnancy. Design: Longitudinal study with two observations. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to pregnant women attending antenatal clinics at gestational weeks 10–13. Of 382 respondents, 129 responded to the SDS again 1 week later. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis shows good fit with the data: χ2/df = 0, comparative fit index (CFI) = 1.000, standardized root mean square residual (SRMR) = 0, and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.718. There is acceptable configural, measurement, and structural invariance of the factor structure between primiparas and multiparas as well as between two observation occasions. The Pregnancy–Unique Quantification of Emesis and Nausea, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Insomnia Severity Index subscales explain 47% of the variance in SDS scores. Conclusion: Perinatal health care professionals should pay more attention to the difficulties and disabilities that pregnant women face. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
Article
Systemic Inflammation Is Associated with Pulmonary Hypertension in Isolated Giant Omphalocele: A Population-Based Study
Healthcare 2022, 10(10), 1998; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10101998 - 11 Oct 2022
Viewed by 504
Abstract
Our objective is to determine perinatal factors contributing to the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with isolated giant omphaloceles (GO). All cases of omphaloceles that underwent prenatal and postnatal care at the University Hospital of Lille between 1996 and 2021 were [...] Read more.
Our objective is to determine perinatal factors contributing to the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients with isolated giant omphaloceles (GO). All cases of omphaloceles that underwent prenatal and postnatal care at the University Hospital of Lille between 1996 and 2021 were reviewed. We included all infants with isolated GO, including at least a part of the liver, who were treated by delayed surgical closure. Prenatal and postnatal data were recorded and correlated with postnatal morbidities. We compared outcomes between a group of infants with GO who developed PH and infants with GO with no PH. We identified 120 infants with omphalocele. Fifty isolated GO cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria of our study. The incidence of PH was 30%. We highlighted a prolonged inflammatory state, defined as a CRP superior to 15 mg/L, platelets higher than 500 G/L, and white blood cells higher than 15 G/l for more than 14 days in patients who developed PH. This event occurred in 73% of patients with PH versus 21% of patients without PH (p < 0.05). Late-onset infection was not different between the two groups. We speculate that prolonged inflammatory syndrome promotes PH in infants with GO treated with delayed surgical closure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
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Article
Preliminary Outcomes of Cervical Cerclage for Shortened Cervix with Decidual Polyp
Healthcare 2022, 10(7), 1312; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071312 - 14 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 826
Abstract
The aim of this study was to elucidate the nature of decidual polyp (DP) and to compare DP outcomes treated with cervical cerclage for a shortened cervix with the outcomes of cases treated with cervical cerclage without DP. The medical records of pregnant [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to elucidate the nature of decidual polyp (DP) and to compare DP outcomes treated with cervical cerclage for a shortened cervix with the outcomes of cases treated with cervical cerclage without DP. The medical records of pregnant women who were complicated with cervical polyps were retrospectively reviewed. Cervical cerclage was considered for those cases with a shortened cervical length of under 25 mm and before 25 gestational weeks. We also reviewed pregnant women who had no cervical polyps, and who underwent cervical cerclage during the same study period, and defined them as the control group. A total of 56 pregnant women with cervical polyps were identified. All of the polyps in the 14 cases that had undergone cervical cerclage migrated into the cervical canal. Of the thirty seven cases with cervical polyps that did not necessitate cervical cerclage, eight women delivered preterm and six of these cases were diagnosed as DP. In all of the women studied, polyp migration was observed in 68.6 %. Cervical cerclage was performed significantly earlier in the DP group than in the control group of 46 cases (p < 0.001; 18.4 weeks vs. 21.4 weeks, respectively). Cervical cerclage is effective in DP cases with a shortened cervical length and polypectomy should not be performed during pregnancy because of the risk of miscarriage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
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Article
Comparison of the Injury Mechanism between Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women Vehicle Passengers Using Car Crash Test Dummies
Healthcare 2022, 10(5), 884; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10050884 - 11 May 2022
Viewed by 877
Abstract
This paper analyzes the kinematics and applied forces of pregnant and non-pregnant women dummies sitting in the rear seat during a frontal vehicle collision to determine differences in the features of abdominal injuries. Sled tests were conducted at 29 and 48 km/h with [...] Read more.
This paper analyzes the kinematics and applied forces of pregnant and non-pregnant women dummies sitting in the rear seat during a frontal vehicle collision to determine differences in the features of abdominal injuries. Sled tests were conducted at 29 and 48 km/h with pregnant and non-pregnant dummies (i.e., MAMA IIB and Hybrid III). The overall kinematics of the dummy, resultant acceleration at the chest, transrational acceleration along each axis at the pelvis, and loads of the lap belt and shoulder belt were examined. The belt loads were higher for the MAMA IIB than for the Hybrid III because the MAMA IIB had a higher body mass than the Hybrid III. The differences in the lap belt loads were 1119 N at 29 km/h and 1981–2365 N at 48 km/h. Therefore, for restrained pregnant women sitting in the rear seat, stronger forces may apply to the lower abdomen during a high-velocity frontal collision. Our results suggest that for restrained pregnant women sitting in the rear seat, the severity of abdominal injuries and the risk of a negative fetal outcome depend on the collision velocity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
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Article
Anxiety, Stress, and Social Support in Pregnant Women in the Province of Leon during COVID-19 Disease
Healthcare 2022, 10(5), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10050791 - 24 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 946
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has posed a high risk to the mental health of the entire population. Pregnant women are strongly affected by the consequences of COVID-19, resulting in increased anxiety and stress. Social support can be a protective factor when it comes to [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has posed a high risk to the mental health of the entire population. Pregnant women are strongly affected by the consequences of COVID-19, resulting in increased anxiety and stress. Social support can be a protective factor when it comes to mental health disturbances such as anxiety, fear, or stress in pregnant women. This research aims to describe the anxiety and stress of women in the first trimester of pregnancy in times of pandemic and its relationship with social support. A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 115 women in the first trimester of pregnancy participated. Anxiety was found in 78.3% of the women. Self-perceived stress correlated significantly with the dimensions “concern for changes in oneself”, “feelings about oneself”, “concern about the future”, and very weakly with social support. In addition, a negative correlation was observed between “feelings about oneself” and social support. During the COVID-19 pandemic, anxiety levels of women in our population are elevated. Pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy showed higher levels of fear of childbirth and concern about the future than multiparous women. Increased social support and decreased stress seem to influence “feeling about oneself”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
Article
The Roles of Obstetrics Training Skills and Utilisation of Maternity Unit Protocols in Reducing Perinatal Mortality in Limpopo Province, South Africa
Healthcare 2022, 10(4), 662; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10040662 - 01 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 845
Abstract
Perinatal mortality has been associated with poor maternal health during pregnancy and intrapartum periods. This study was conducted to determine the effects of obstetrics training programmes and the utilization of maternal unit protocols in the management of obstetric complications in reducing neonatal mortality [...] Read more.
Perinatal mortality has been associated with poor maternal health during pregnancy and intrapartum periods. This study was conducted to determine the effects of obstetrics training programmes and the utilization of maternal unit protocols in the management of obstetric complications in reducing neonatal mortality rate in selected public hospitals in the Vhembe district of Limpopo province, South Africa. A quantitative, descriptive design was used and a non-probability purposive sampling method was used to select midwives with a minimum of two (2) years of working experience in maternity wards of selected public hospitals. A total of 105 completed questionnaires were analysed using SPSS version 23. Most of the respondents were within the age group of 40–59 years (74.3%) and with professional experience of more than 10 years (76.8%). More than half (63.8%) had qualified as midwives at a diploma level. Only 44.8% indicated that the protocols were always utilised, even though the majority (70.5%) believed that the protocols are helpful in managing obstetrics complications. The obstetric skills are helpful in reducing neonatal mortality, however, utilisation of the protocols is not encouraging in the studied health facilities. We recommend that efforts should be geared towards the enforcement of the protocol’s use, and all midwives should be encouraged to undergo the trainings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
Article
Preventable Adverse Events in Obstetrics—Systemic Assessment of Their Incidence and Linked Risk Factors
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010097 - 04 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1354
Abstract
(1) Background: Adverse events (AEs) are an inherent part of all medical care. Obstetrics is special: it is characterized by a very high expectation regarding safety and has rare cases of harm, but extremely high individual consequences of harm. However, there is no [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Adverse events (AEs) are an inherent part of all medical care. Obstetrics is special: it is characterized by a very high expectation regarding safety and has rare cases of harm, but extremely high individual consequences of harm. However, there is no standardized identification, documentation, or uniform terminology for the preventability of AEs in obstetrics. In this study, therefore, an obstetrics-specific matrix on the preventable factors of AEs is established based on existing literature to enable standardized reactive risk management in obstetrics. (2) Methods: AEs in obstetrics from one hospital from the year 2018 were retrospectively evaluated according to a criteria matrix regarding preventability. Risk factors for preventable AEs (pAEs) were identified. (3) Results: Out of 2865 births, adverse events were identified in 659 cases (23%). After detailed case analysis, 88 cases (13%) showed at least 1 pAE. A total of 19 risk factors could be identified in 6 categories of pAEs. (4) Conclusion: Preventable categories of error could be identified. Relevant obstetric risk factors related to the error categories were identified and categorized. If these can be modified in the future with targeted measures of proactive risk management, pAEs in obstetrics could also be reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
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Article
Experience of Late Miscarriage and Practical Implications for Post-Natal Health Care: Qualitative Study
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010079 - 01 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1633
Abstract
Miscarriage is the most common reason for pregnancy loss, affecting around one in four pregnancies. It is classified as a traumatic event, associated with an increased risk for depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, alcohol dependence, somatic symptoms, sexual dysfunction, suicide, and complicated grief. This [...] Read more.
Miscarriage is the most common reason for pregnancy loss, affecting around one in four pregnancies. It is classified as a traumatic event, associated with an increased risk for depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, alcohol dependence, somatic symptoms, sexual dysfunction, suicide, and complicated grief. This study aimed to analyse experiences of late miscarriage and to describe practical implications for post-natal health care based on characteristics of pregnancy loss revealed in a qualitative study. Seven women who had late miscarriages participated in in-depth biographical interviews. A phenomenological thematic analysis was applied. Experiential characteristics of late miscarriage were described by four themes and 13 subthemes: the initial splitting state (Dissociation, An Opened Void, An impaired Symbiosis, and The Body is Still Pregnant while the Psyche is Mourning); Betrayal of the body (Symbolic Experience of Internalised Death, Shocking Materiality of the Ongoing Miscarriage, Lost control of the Body, and Confusing Body Signals); Disconnecting (Depersonalising Medical Environment, Guilt Falsifies perception, and Retreat as a means of Self-Preservation); and Reconnecting (Collecting Shatters and Reinterpretation of Maternal Identity). Based on the results of the experiential analysis, another four themes represent practical recommendations for post-natal health care: Informing, Opportunity for Goodbye, Attention to Emotional Wellbeing, and Respectful Hospital Environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
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Article
The Pregnancy-Unique Quantification of Emesis and Nausea (PUQE-24): Configural, Measurement, and Structural Invariance between Nulliparas and Multiparas and across Two Measurement Time Points
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1553; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111553 - 15 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1012
Abstract
Background: The severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) correlates with pregnancy complications. This study aimed to confirm the measurement and structural invariance of the 24 h Pregnancy-Unique Quantification of Emesis and Nausea (PUQE-24) regarding parity and observation time among pregnant women [...] Read more.
Background: The severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP) correlates with pregnancy complications. This study aimed to confirm the measurement and structural invariance of the 24 h Pregnancy-Unique Quantification of Emesis and Nausea (PUQE-24) regarding parity and observation time among pregnant women during the first trimester. Methods: Questionnaires including the PUQE-24 and the Health-Related Quality of Life for Nausea and Vomiting during Pregnancy (NVP-QOL) questionnaire were distributed to pregnant women from 10 to 13 weeks of gestation who were attending antenatal clinics. There were 382 respondents, and of these, 129 responded to the PUQE-24 again one week later. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis of this single factor model showed a good fit with the data: CFI = 1.000. The PUQE-24 factor and NVP-QOL factor were strongly correlated (r = 82). Configural, measurement, and structural invariance of the factor structure of the PUQE items were confirmed between primiparas and multiparas as well as at the test and retest observation occasions. Conclusion: The findings suggested that using the PUQE-24 among pregnant women in the first trimester was robust in its factor structure. The PUQE-24 may be a promising tool as an easy and robust measure of the severity of nausea and vomiting among pregnant women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
Article
Perceptions and Practice of Preconception Care by Healthcare Workers and High-Risk Women in South Africa: A Qualitative Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(11), 1552; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9111552 - 15 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1224
Abstract
Preconception care is biomedical, behavioural, and social health interventions provided to women and couples before conception. This service is sometimes prioritised for women at high risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Evidence revealed that only very few women in Africa with severe chronic conditions [...] Read more.
Preconception care is biomedical, behavioural, and social health interventions provided to women and couples before conception. This service is sometimes prioritised for women at high risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Evidence revealed that only very few women in Africa with severe chronic conditions receive or seek preconception care advice and assessment for future pregnancy. Thus, this study aimed to explore the perceptions and practice of preconception care by healthcare workers and high-risk women in Kwa-Zulu-Natal, South Africa. This exploratory, descriptive qualitative study utilised individual in-depth interviews to collect data from 24 women at high risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and five healthcare workers. Thematic analysis was conducted using Nvivo version 12. Five main themes that emerged from the study include participants’ views, patients’ access to information, practices, and perceived benefits of preconception care. The healthcare workers were well acquainted with the preconception care concept, but the women had inconsistent acquaintance. Both groups acknowledge the role preconception care can play in the reduction of maternal and child mortality. A recommendation is made for the healthcare workers to use the ‘One key’ reproductive life plan question as an entry point for the provision of preconception care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)

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Commentary
Antenatal Assessment of the Prognosis of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: Ethical Considerations and Impact for the Management
Healthcare 2022, 10(8), 1433; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10081433 - 30 Jul 2022
Viewed by 708
Abstract
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with abnormal pulmonary development, which is responsible for pulmonary hypoplasia with structural and functional abnormalities in pulmonary circulation, leading to the failure of the cardiorespiratory adaptation at birth. Despite improvement in treatment options and advances in neonatal [...] Read more.
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with abnormal pulmonary development, which is responsible for pulmonary hypoplasia with structural and functional abnormalities in pulmonary circulation, leading to the failure of the cardiorespiratory adaptation at birth. Despite improvement in treatment options and advances in neonatal care, mortality remains high, at close to 15 to 30%. Several risk factors of mortality and morbidities have been validated in fetuses with CDH. Antenatal assessment of lung volume is a reliable way to predict the severity of CDH. The two most commonly used measurements are the observed/expected lung to head ratio (LHRo/e) and the total pulmonary volume (TPV) on MRI. The estimation of total pulmonary volume (TPVo/e) by means of prenatal MRI remains the gold standard. In addition to LHR and TPV measurements, the position of the liver (up, in the thorax or down, in the abdomen) also plays a role in the prognostic evaluation. This prenatal prognostic evaluation can be used to select fetuses for antenatal surgery, consisting of fetoscopic endoluminal tracheal occlusion (FETO). The antenatal criteria of severe CDH with an ascended liver (LHRo/e or TPVo/e < 25%) are undoubtedly associated with a high risk of death or significant morbidity. However, despite the possibility of estimating the risk in antenatal care, it is difficult to determine what is in the child’s best interest, as there still are many uncertainties: (1) uncertainty about individual short-term prognosis; (2) uncertainty about long-term prognosis; and (3) uncertainty about the subsequent quality of life, especially when it is known that, with a similar degree of disability, a child’s quality of life varies from poor to good depending on multiple factors, including family support. Nevertheless, as the LHR decreases, the foreseeable “burden” becomes increasingly significant, and the expected benefit is increasingly unlikely. The legal and moral principle of the proportionality of medical procedures, as well as the prohibition of “unreasonable obstinacy” in all investigations or treatments undertaken, is necessary in these situations. However, the scientific and rational basis for assessing the long-term individual prognosis is limited to statistical data that do not adequately reflect individual risk. The risk of self-fulfilling prophecies should be kept in mind. The information given to parents must take this uncertainty into account when deciding on the treatment plan after birth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pregnancy and Perinatal Health)
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