Special Issue "Kinetoplastid Genomics and Beyond"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jose M. Requena
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain
Interests: Leishmania; Trypanosoma; heat shock proteins; RNA binding proteins; regulation of gene expression; genomics; transcriptomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For a long time, kinetoplastid protists (class Kinetoplastea) have attracted a great deal of scientific attention because this group includes several organisms of tremendous medical and economic importance (e.g., Trypanosoma ssp., causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness in humans; and Leishmania spp., causing kala-azar and other leishmaniases). Moreover, many parasites for plants (Phytomonas spp.) and insects (Leptomonas, Crithidia, and other genera) also belong to this class. In addition, free-living kinetoplastids are abundant and active microbial predators in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

On the other hand, these organisms are also the objects of considerable basic scientific interest due to their bizarre cytology, genome organization, and mechanisms of gene regulation. In recent years, the incorporation of “omics” methodologies to the study of these organisms has allowed assembly of the genomes for a growing number of both parasitic and free-living kinetoplastids to analyze changes in gene expression, determine the proteome compendium, establish metabolic pathways, and so on.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together a set of reviews and research articles addressing aspects like genome organization, mechanisms of gene expression, specific metabolic pathways, evolutionary relationships and databases, among others, focused on any species belonging to this group of protists.

Dr. Jose M. Requena
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • kinetoplastids
  • genome assembly and annotation
  • regulation and gene expression
  • proteome
  • metabolomics
  • phylogenetics
  • databases

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis of the Minimum Number of Replication Origins in Trypanosomatids and Yeasts
Genes 2020, 11(5), 523; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11050523 - 08 May 2020
Abstract
Single-celled eukaryote genomes predominantly replicate through multiple origins. Although origin usage during the S-phase has been elucidated in some of these organisms, few studies have comparatively approached this dynamic. Here, we developed a user-friendly website able to calculate the length of the cell [...] Read more.
Single-celled eukaryote genomes predominantly replicate through multiple origins. Although origin usage during the S-phase has been elucidated in some of these organisms, few studies have comparatively approached this dynamic. Here, we developed a user-friendly website able to calculate the length of the cell cycle phases for any organism. Next, using a formula developed by our group, we showed a comparative analysis among the minimum number of replication origins (MO) required to duplicate an entire chromosome within the S-phase duration in trypanosomatids (Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania major, and Trypanosoma brucei) and yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Using the data obtained by our analysis, it was possible to predict the MO required in a situation of replication stress. Also, our findings allow establishing a threshold for the number of origins, which serves as a parameter for genome approaches that map origins. Moreover, our data suggest that when compared to yeasts, trypanosomatids use much more origins than the minimum needed. This is the first time a comparative analysis of the minimum number of origins has been successfully applied. These data may provide new insight into the understanding of the replication mechanism and a new methodological framework for studying single-celled eukaryote genomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Kinetoplastid Genomics and Beyond)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Of Drugs and Trypanosomatids: New Tools and Knowledge to Reduce Bottlenecks in Drug Discovery
Genes 2020, 11(7), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11070722 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
Leishmaniasis (Leishmania species), sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei), and Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) are devastating and globally spread diseases caused by trypanosomatid parasites. At present, drugs for treating trypanosomatid diseases are far from ideal due to host toxicity, elevated [...] Read more.
Leishmaniasis (Leishmania species), sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei), and Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) are devastating and globally spread diseases caused by trypanosomatid parasites. At present, drugs for treating trypanosomatid diseases are far from ideal due to host toxicity, elevated cost, limited access, and increasing rates of drug resistance. Technological advances in parasitology, chemistry, and genomics have unlocked new possibilities for novel drug concepts and compound screening technologies that were previously inaccessible. In this perspective, we discuss current models used in drug-discovery cascades targeting trypanosomatids (from in vitro to in vivo approaches), their use and limitations in a biological context, as well as different examples of recently discovered lead compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Kinetoplastid Genomics and Beyond)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1. Application of CRISPR/Cas9-based reverse genetics in Leishmania braziliensis: conserved roles for HSP100 and HSP23
  2. Evidence for a functional SENP/SUMOylation pathway in Leishmania donovani
  3. A survey of Trypanosoma brucei mRNA-binding-protein specificities reveals mRNA clusters of differing lengths and functions
Back to TopTop